Special Issue "Current Research in Magnetic Nanomaterials: From Fundamentals towards Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Inorganic Materials and Metal-Organic Frameworks".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022 | Viewed by 1289

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ovidiu Crisan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Institute for Materials Physics, 077125 Magurele, Romania
Interests: magnetic nanomaterials; surface-functionalized nanoparticles; nanomagnetism; nanoelectronics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Magnetic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems represent some of the most widely researched topics over recent decades. Recent breakthroughs in high-resolution imaging techniques, modern computing, and nanoelectronics have favoured an increase in interest in the quest for new materials and novel applications. Tailor-made nanoclusters and surface functionalized nanoparticles, multilayered thin films, as well as nanocomposite magnetic materials are widely researched and expected results will be of benefit to the future digitalized economy. In the search for new magnets, although computer modelling may provide hints for finding structures that minimize the internal energy, the control of nanoscale phenomena in real time remains an unsolved issue. Magnetic nanoparticles deserve special attention because of their extended applicability not only for data storage and nanoscale spintronics applications but also for healthcare. Medical researchers are actively seeking to develop improved tools for hyperthermia therapy or drug delivery.

This Special Issue is trying to gather a carefully selected compilation of original research papers to aid our understanding of and gain insights into magnetic properties, tailored magnetic materials, and surface functionalized nanoparticles. This issue also calls for papers addressing fundamental approaches to magnetism and spintronics, prediction of novel magnetic compounds, as well as application-specific materials such as magnets for use in extreme conditions of technological operations and nanomagnetic systems for biomedical use as drug delivery agents, hyperthermia therapy, and contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging or gene sequencing, to name but a few.

Dr. Ovidiu Crisan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • nanocomposite magnets
  • surface functionalized nanoparticles, nanoscale magnetism
  • prediction of novel magnetic compounds
  • nanomagnetism and spintronics
  • tailor-made magnetic materials
  • exchange coupled magnets
  • magnets for extreme conditions of operation
  • nanomagnets for biomedical applications

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Raman, TEM, EELS, and Magnetic Studies of a Magnetically Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanohybrid following Exposure to Daphnia magna Biomarkers
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(11), 1805; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12111805 - 25 May 2022
Viewed by 428
Abstract
A ternary nanocomposite made of nanomaghemite, nanoanatase, and graphene oxide has been successfully synthesized using an inorganic coprecipitation approach, and it has been systematically investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and different spectrocopic techniques (electron energy loss, µ-Raman, and 57Fe Mössbauer) [...] Read more.
A ternary nanocomposite made of nanomaghemite, nanoanatase, and graphene oxide has been successfully synthesized using an inorganic coprecipitation approach, and it has been systematically investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and different spectrocopic techniques (electron energy loss, µ-Raman, and 57Fe Mössbauer) after interaction with an effluent containing Daphnia magna individuals. Specifically, the influence of the nanocomposite over the Daphnia magna carapace, administered in two doses (0.5 mg mL−1 and 1 mg mL−1), has been characterized using µ-Raman spectroscopy before and after laser burning protocols, producing information about the physicochemical interaction with the biomarker. The thermal stability of the nanocomposite was found to be equal to 500 °C, where the nanoanatase and the nanomaghemite phases have respectively conserved their structural identities. The magnetic properties of the nanomaghemite have also been kept unchanged even after the high-temperature experiments and exposure to Daphnia magna. In particular, the size, texture, and structural and morphological properties of the ternary nanocomposite have not shown any significant physicochemical modifications after magnetic decantation recuperation. A significant result is that the graphene oxide reduction was kept even after the ecotoxicological assays. These sets of observations are based on the fact that while the UV-Vis spectrum has confirmed the graphene oxide reduction with a localized peak at 260 nm, the 300-K and 15-K 57Fe Mössbauer spectra have only revealed the presence of stoichiometric maghemite, i.e., the two well-defined static magnetic sextets often found in the bulk ferrimagnetic counterpart phase. The Mössbauer results have also agreed with the trivalent-like valence state of Fe ions, as also suggested by electron energy loss spectroscopy data. Thus, the ternary nanocomposite does not substantially affect the Daphnia magna, and it can be easily recovered using an ordinary magnetic decantation protocol due to the ferrimagnetic-like character of the nanomaghemite phase. Consequently, it shows remarkable physicochemical properties for further reuse, such as cleaning by polluted effluents, at least where Daphnia magna species are present. Full article
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Article
Highly Sensitive Nanomagnetic Quantification of Extracellular Vesicles by Immunochromatographic Strips: A Tool for Liquid Biopsy
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(9), 1579; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12091579 - 06 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 600
Abstract
Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are promising agents for liquid biopsy—a non-invasive approach for the diagnosis of cancer and evaluation of therapy response. However, EV potential is limited by the lack of sufficiently sensitive, time-, and cost-efficient methods for their registration. This research aimed at [...] Read more.
Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are promising agents for liquid biopsy—a non-invasive approach for the diagnosis of cancer and evaluation of therapy response. However, EV potential is limited by the lack of sufficiently sensitive, time-, and cost-efficient methods for their registration. This research aimed at developing a highly sensitive and easy-to-use immunochromatographic tool based on magnetic nanoparticles for EV quantification. The tool is demonstrated by detection of EVs isolated from cell culture supernatants and various body fluids using characteristic biomarkers, CD9 and CD81, and a tumor-associated marker—epithelial cell adhesion molecules. The detection limit of 3.7 × 105 EV/µL is one to two orders better than the most sensitive traditional lateral flow system and commercial ELISA kits. The detection specificity is ensured by an isotype control line on the test strip. The tool’s advantages are due to the spatial quantification of EV-bound magnetic nanolabels within the strip volume by an original electronic technique. The inexpensive tool, promising for liquid biopsy in daily clinical routines, can be extended to other relevant biomarkers. Full article
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