Special Issue "Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Hyperthermia and Theranostics"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 12 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Ren-Jei Chung
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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, National Taipei University of Technology (Taipei Tech), Taipei 10608, Taiwan
Interests: biomaterials; nano-biotechnology; tissue engineering
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Hsi-Chin Wu
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Co-Guest Editor
Department of Materials Engineering, Tatung University, Taipei, Taiwan
Interests: biomaterials; nano-biotechnology; tissue engineering
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Udesh Dhawan

Co-Guest Editor
Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan
Interests: biomaterials; nano-biotechnology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanotechnological advancements in the last decade have revolutionized the fields of therapeutics, and nanoparticle-related applications are at its forefront. The discovery of experimental methodologies to fabricate nanoparticles showing high biocompatibility in vivo has encouraged biomedical engineers to test their applications in multiple domains. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), essentially the ones displaying superparamagnetic properties, such as zero coercivity, display hyperthermia upon alternating magnetic field (AMF) stimulation. The ease of surface functionalization of MNPs allows their conjugation with anticancer drugs to achieve hyperthermia-induced chemodrug dissociation, resulting in controlled drug release. This behavior can be widely exploited by biomedical engineers in cancer theranostics considering the property of enhanced chemodrug sensitivity by the cancer stroma. Another advantageous feature of MNPs is their ability to affect T1 or T2 relaxation rates, thus enabling their applications as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. Thus, multi-functional MNPs are attractive candidates for simultaneous tumor imaging and therapy, and thus, theranostics.

A plethora of research has therefore been conducted to conceptualize the design of MNPs for biological applications. While some studies have focused on the amalgamation of different metals to yield multimodal alloy nanoparticles, others have aimed to develop core–shell MNPs with extraordinary biocompatibility or to elucidate the mechanisms governing the MNPs’ mode-of-action. The latest trend involves the fabrication of biomolecule-tagged MNPs for cancer-cell-specific ingestion, thereby limiting harm to the healthy stroma. Thus, MNP-induced hyperthermia is a new rising field of interest.

This Special Issue invites research articles involving the design, fabrication, and utilization of magnetic nanoparticle-induced hyperthermia for biomedical applications. Review articles summarizing the existing literature on the advent of MNPs for hyperthermia-mediated applications are also welcome.

Prof. Ren-Jei Chung
Prof. His-Chin Wu
Dr. Udesh Dhawan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • magnetic nanoparticles
  • hyperthermia
  • nanoparticles
  • cancer therapy
  • biomedical engineering
  • nanotechnology
  • theranostics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Engineering Core-Shell Structures of Magnetic Ferrite Nanoparticles for High Hyperthermia Performance
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 991; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050991 - 21 May 2020
Abstract
Magnetic ferrite nanoparticles (MFNs) with high heating efficiency are highly desirable for hyperthermia applications. As conventional MFNs usually show low heating efficiency with a lower specific loss power (SLP), extensive efforts to enhance the SLP of MFNs have been made by [...] Read more.
Magnetic ferrite nanoparticles (MFNs) with high heating efficiency are highly desirable for hyperthermia applications. As conventional MFNs usually show low heating efficiency with a lower specific loss power (SLP), extensive efforts to enhance the SLP of MFNs have been made by varying the particle compositions, sizes, and structures. In this study, we attempted to increase the SLP values by creating core-shell structures of MFNs. Accordingly, first we synthesized three different types of core ferrite nanoparticle of magnetite (mag), cobalt ferrite (cf) and zinc cobalt ferrite (zcf). Secondly, we synthesized eight bi-magnetic core-shell structured MFNs; Fe3O4@CoFe2O4 ([email protected]1, [email protected]2), CoFe2O4@Fe3O4 ([email protected]1, [email protected]2), Fe3O4@ZnCoFe2O4 ([email protected]1, [email protected]2), and ZnCoFe2O4@Fe3O4 ([email protected]1, [email protected]2), using a modified controlled co-precipitation process. SLP values of the prepared core-shell MFNs were investigated with respect to their compositions and core/shell dimensions while varying the applied magnetic field strength. Hyperthermia properties of the prepared core-shell MFNs were further compared to commercial magnetic nanoparticles under the safe limits of magnetic field parameters (<5 × 109 A/(m·s)). As a result, the highest SLP value (379.2 W/gmetal) was obtained for [email protected]1, with a magnetic field strength of 50 kA/m and frequency of 97 kHz. On the other hand, the lowest SLP value (1.7 W/gmetal) was obtained for [email protected]1, with a magnetic field strength of 40 kA/m and frequency of 97 kHz. We also found that magnetic properties and thickness of the shell play critical roles in heating efficiency and hyperthermia performance. In conclusion, we successfully enhanced the SLP of MFNs by engineering their compositions and dimensions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Hyperthermia and Theranostics)
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Open AccessArticle
Magnetic Graphene-Based Sheets for Bacteria Capture and Destruction Using a High-Frequency Magnetic Field
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(4), 674; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040674 - 03 Apr 2020
Abstract
Magnetic reduced graphene oxide (MRGO) sheets were prepared by embedding Fe3O4 nanoparticles on polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA)-modified graphene oxide (GO) sheets for bacteria capture and destruction under a high-frequency magnetic field (HFMF). The characteristics of MRGO sheets were [...] Read more.
Magnetic reduced graphene oxide (MRGO) sheets were prepared by embedding Fe3O4 nanoparticles on polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA)-modified graphene oxide (GO) sheets for bacteria capture and destruction under a high-frequency magnetic field (HFMF). The characteristics of MRGO sheets were evaluated systematically by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), zeta potential measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). TEM observation revealed that magnetic nanoparticles (8–10 nm) were dispersed on MRGO sheets. VSM measurements confirmed the superparamagnetic characteristics of the MRGO sheets. Under HFMF exposure, the temperature of MRGO sheets increased from 25 to 42 °C. Furthermore, we investigated the capability of MRGO sheets to capture and destroy bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). The results show that MRGO sheets could capture bacteria and kill them through an HFMF, showing a great potential in magnetic separation and antibacterial application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Hyperthermia and Theranostics)
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