Special Issue "Impedance Spectroscopy Characterization of Nanomaterials for Energy Application"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Adriano Sacco
Website
Guest Editor
Center for Sustainable Future Technologies, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), 10144 Torino, Italy
Interests: energy; photovoltaics; electrochemistry; electrocatalysis; CO2 capture and conversion; nanomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanostructured materials are, nowadays, widely employed for a large variety of energy-related applications and devices, including catalysis, water-splitting, solar cells, fuel cells, supercapacitors, batteries. For all of these purposes, nanomaterials are in strict contact with liquid, solid or quasi-solid electrolytes, thus making possible characterize them through electrochemical techniques. Among the different methods, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) demonstrated to be effective in characterizing nanostructure materials, being easy, fast, low-cost, non-destructive, and often being employable in situ, i.e., directly in real operating devices. Through EIS, several physical and chemical properties of nanostructured materials can be investigated, as well as different ionic and electronic processes involved in their use. This Special Issue is intended to be a collection of reviews and original papers focused on the most recent development in characterization of nanomaterials for energy application trough the EIS technique.

Dr. Adriano Sacco
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • impedance spectroscopy
  • catalysis
  • water-splitting
  • solar cellsfuel cells, supercapacitors
  • batteries
  • transport properties
  • charge transfer

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Biohybrid Cathode in Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(1), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9010036 - 28 Dec 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
The aim of this work is to investigate the properties of biofilms, spontaneously grown on cathode electrodes of single-chamber microbial fuel cells, when used as catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). To this purpose, a comparison between two sets of different carbon-based cathode [...] Read more.
The aim of this work is to investigate the properties of biofilms, spontaneously grown on cathode electrodes of single-chamber microbial fuel cells, when used as catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). To this purpose, a comparison between two sets of different carbon-based cathode electrodes is carried out. The first one (Pt-based biocathode) is based on the proliferation of the biofilm onto a Pt/C layer, leading thus to the creation of a biohybrid catalyst. The second set of electrodes (Pt-free biocathode) is based on a bare carbon-based material, on which biofilm grows and acts as the sole catalyst for ORR. Linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) characterization confirmed better performance when the biofilm is formed on both Pt-based and Pt-free cathodes, with respect to that obtained by biofilm-free cathodes. To analyze the properties of spontaneously grown cathodic biofilms on carbon-based electrodes, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is employed. This study demonstrates that the highest power production is reached when aerobic biofilm acts as a catalyst for ORR in synergy with Pt in the biohybrid cathode. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Enhanced Conductivity of Composite Membranes Based on Sulfonated Poly(Ether Ether Ketone) (SPEEK) with Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks (ZIFs)
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(12), 1042; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8121042 - 13 Dec 2018
Cited by 5
Abstract
The zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) ZIF-8, ZIF-67, and a Zn/Co bimetallic mixture (ZMix) were synthesized and used as fillers in the preparation of composite sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) membranes. The presence of the ZIFs in the polymeric matrix enhanced proton transport relative [...] Read more.
The zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) ZIF-8, ZIF-67, and a Zn/Co bimetallic mixture (ZMix) were synthesized and used as fillers in the preparation of composite sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) membranes. The presence of the ZIFs in the polymeric matrix enhanced proton transport relative to that observed for SPEEK or ZIFs alone. The real and imaginary parts of the complex conductivity were obtained by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and the temperature and frequency dependence of the real part of the conductivity were analyzed. The results at different temperatures show that the direct current (dc) conductivity was three orders of magnitude higher for composite membranes than for SPEEK, and that of the SPEEK/ZMix membrane was higher than those for SPEEK/Z8 and SPEEK/Z67, respectively. This behavior turns out to be more evident as the temperature increases: the conductivity of the SPEEK/ZMix was 8.5 × 10−3 S·cm−1, while for the SPEEK/Z8 and SPEEK/Z67 membranes, the values were 2.5 × 10−3 S·cm−1 and 1.6 × 10−3 S·cm−1, respectively, at 120 °C. Similarly, the real and imaginary parts of the complex dielectric constant were obtained, and an analysis of tan δ was carried out for all of the membranes under study. Using this value, the diffusion coefficient and the charge carrier density were obtained using the analysis of electrode polarization (EP). Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Impedance Spectroscopy Analysis and Equivalent Circuit Modeling of Graphene Oxide Solutions
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(12), 446; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano7120446 - 14 Dec 2017
Cited by 6
Abstract
The optical and electrical characteristics of a graphene oxide solution (GS) with different graphene oxide (GO) concentrations in de-ionized water are investigated via the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method. The measurement results produced by the EIS for the GS are represented with both [...] Read more.
The optical and electrical characteristics of a graphene oxide solution (GS) with different graphene oxide (GO) concentrations in de-ionized water are investigated via the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method. The measurement results produced by the EIS for the GS are represented with both Bode and Nyquist plots in a frequency range from 1 kHz to 10 MHz. Using these results, we develop an equivalent circuit model as a function of the GO concentration, representing the GS as a mixed circuit of two-dimensional (2D) GO dispersed in parallel in de-ionized (DI) water. The underlying physics of the current-flowing behavior in the GS are explained and interpreted using empirical circuit models; the circuit model also shows that highly resistive GO becomes conductive in GS form in the DI water. The findings in this work should draw new attention toward GSes and related applications, including functional composite materials, catalysts, and filter membranes. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop