Special Issue "Properties and Applications of Graphene and Its Derivatives"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. José Miguel González-Domínguez
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
CSIC - Instituto de Carboquimica (ICB), Zaragoza, Spain
Interests: graphene; carbon nanotubes; nanocomposites; nanomaterials processing; chemical functionalization; structural applications; (bio)sensing; nanomedicine; sustainability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Graphene is a two-dimensional, one-atom-thick material made entirely of carbon atoms, arranged in a honeycomb lattice. Because of its distinctive mechanical (e.g., high strength and flexibility) and electronic (great electrical and thermal conductivities) properties, graphene is an ideal candidate in myriad applications. Thus, it has just started to be engineered in electronics, photonics, biomedicine, and polymer-based composites, to name a few. The graphene family is even wider, and includes other members such as graphene oxide (GO), reduced GO (rGO), or graphene quantum dots (GQDs), which are also very interesting materials, whose properties (markedly different from those of pristine graphene) are under thorough study. Understanding the properties of the graphene family of nanomaterials is crucial for developing advanced applications to solve important challenges in critical areas such as energy and health.

This Special Issue aims at gathering original research works in which the excellent properties of graphene nanomaterials are exploited in cutting-edge applications. These include, but are not limited to, optoelectronics, nanomedicine, structures, energy, transport, sensing or environment and sustainability applications. Papers on graphene hybrid nanostructures, doped, or functionalized graphene derivatives are also welcome.

Dr. José Miguel González-Domínguez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • graphene derivatives
  • processing and production
  • chemical and physical properties characterization
  • applications in critical fields (energy, optoelectronics, biomedicine, sensing structures, environment, etc.)

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Scalable Preparation of Low-Defect Graphene by Urea-Assisted Liquid-Phase Shear Exfoliation of Graphite and Its Application in Doxorubicin Analysis
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(2), 267; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10020267 - 05 Feb 2020
Abstract
The mass production of graphene is of great interest for commercialization and industrial applications. Here, we demonstrate that high-quality graphene nanosheets can be produced in large quantities by liquid-phase shear exfoliation under ambient conditions in organic solvents, such as 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), with the [...] Read more.
The mass production of graphene is of great interest for commercialization and industrial applications. Here, we demonstrate that high-quality graphene nanosheets can be produced in large quantities by liquid-phase shear exfoliation under ambient conditions in organic solvents, such as 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), with the assistance of urea as a stabilizer. We can achieve low-defect graphene (LDG) using this approach, which is relatively simple and easily available, thereby rendering it to be an efficient route for the mass production of graphene. We also demonstrate the electrochemical sensing of an LDG-modified electrode for the determination of doxorubicin (DOX). The sensor shows an enhanced electrocatalytic property towards DOX, leading to a high sensitivity (7.23 × 10−1 μM/μA) with a detection limit of 39.3 nM (S/N = 3). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Properties and Applications of Graphene and Its Derivatives)
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Open AccessArticle
Tailorable Synthesis of Highly Oxidized Graphene Oxides via an Environmentally-Friendly Electrochemical Process
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(2), 239; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10020239 - 29 Jan 2020
Abstract
Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive alternative to graphene for many applications due to its captivating optical, chemical, and electrical characteristics. In this work, GO powders with a different amount of surface groups were synthesized from graphite via an electrochemical two-stage process. Many [...] Read more.
Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive alternative to graphene for many applications due to its captivating optical, chemical, and electrical characteristics. In this work, GO powders with a different amount of surface groups were synthesized from graphite via an electrochemical two-stage process. Many synthesis conditions were tried to maximize the oxidation level, and comprehensive characterization of the resulting samples was carried out via elemental analysis, microscopies (TEM, SEM, AFM), X-ray diffraction, FT-IR and Raman spectroscopies as well as electrical resistance measurements. SEM and TEM images corroborate that the electrochemical process used herein preserves the integrity of the graphene flakes, enabling to obtain large, uniform and well exfoliated GO sheets. The GOs display a wide range of C/O ratios, determined by the voltage and time of each stage as well as the electrolyte concentration, and an unprecedented minimum C/O value was obtained for the optimal conditions. FT-IR evidences strong intermolecular interactions between neighbouring oxygenated groups. The intensity ratio of D/G bands in the Raman spectra is high for samples prepared using concentrated H2SO4 as an electrolyte, indicative of many defects. Furthermore, these GOs exhibit smaller interlayer spacing than that expected according to their oxygen content, which suggests predominant oxidation on the flake edges. Results point out that the electrical resistance is conditioned mostly by the interlayer distance and not simply by the C/O ratio. The tuning of the oxidation level is useful for the design of GOs with tailorable structural, electrical, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Properties and Applications of Graphene and Its Derivatives)
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