Special Issue "Functional Glyconanomaterials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jose M. Palomo
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Group of Chemical Biology and Biocatalysis
Departament of Biocatalysis, Institute of Catalysis (ICP-CSIC), Marie Curie 2, Cantoblanco, Campus UAM, 28049 Madrid, Spain
Interests: protein chemistry; nanocatalysis; biotransformations; biocatalysis; carbohydrate chemistry; chemical biology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. M. Carmen Galan
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1TS, United Kingdom
Interests: carbohydrate chemistry; glycoconjugates; nanomaterials; polysaccharide hydrogels; biotransformations and medicinal chemistry
Prof. Dr. José Manuel García Fernández
Website
Guest Editor
Bioorganic and Supramolecular Carbohydrate Chemistry Group, Institute of Chemical Research (IIQ), CSIC – University of Seville, Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla, Spain
Interests: carbohydrate chemistry, cyclodextrins, glycomimetics, multivalency, self-assembly, drug delivery, gene delivery, glycosidase inhibitors, glycodrugs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanotechnology provides a new array of techniques and platforms to study glycosystems. Recent developments in the field have provided access to an advanced toolkit of synthetic nanomaterials and improved techniques to study such molecules at high resolution. Current advances in glycobiology research have demonstrated that glycosylated biomacromolecules play crucial roles in a wide range of important biological functions. Thus, the development of glycofunctionalized materials emulating or interfering in those processes, such as glycocarrier systems or glycoconjugate drugs, offer great potential for applications in a broad range of fields. The chemical diversity of carbohydrates can be exploited for the development of new materials with controlled and precise chemical, physical, and biological properties.

This Special Issue invites research articles involving the design, fabrication, and utilization of glyconanomaterials for biomedical applications.

Prof. Dr. Jose M. Palomo
Prof. Dr. M. Carmen Galan
Prof. Dr. José Manuel García Fernández
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Carbohydrates
  • Glyconanoparticles
  • Glycoconjugates
  • Quantum Dots
  • Metal nanoparticles
  • Glycopeptides
  • Glyconanoarrays
  • Cyclodextrins
  • Graphene
  • Nanocomposites
  • Anti-Cancer
  • Antimicrobial
  • Drug Delivery
  • Tissue Engineering

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Nanoporous Microsponge Particles (NMP) of Polysaccharides as Universal Carriers for Biomolecules Delivery
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(6), 1075; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10061075 - 31 May 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 803
Abstract
Different polysaccharides—namely dextran, carboxymethyl dextran, alginate, and hyaluronic acid—were compared for the synthesis of nanoporous microsponges particles (NMPs) obtained from a one-pot self-precipitation/cross-linking process. The morphologies and sizes of the NMPs were evaluated comparatively with respect to polymer-to-polymer and cross-linker solvents (water-based vs. [...] Read more.
Different polysaccharides—namely dextran, carboxymethyl dextran, alginate, and hyaluronic acid—were compared for the synthesis of nanoporous microsponges particles (NMPs) obtained from a one-pot self-precipitation/cross-linking process. The morphologies and sizes of the NMPs were evaluated comparatively with respect to polymer-to-polymer and cross-linker solvents (water-based vs. DMSO). We found that the radial distribution of the polymer in the near-spherical NMPs was found to peak either at the core or in the corona of the particle, depending both on the specific polymer or the solvent used for the formation of NMPs. The NMP porosity and the swelling capability were evaluated via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The degradation study indicated that after 10 h incubation with a reducing agent, approximately 80% of the NMPs were disassembled into soluble polysaccharide chains. The adsorption and release capacity of each type of NMP were evaluated using fluorescently labeled bovine serum albumin and lysozyme as model proteins, highlighting a release time typically much longer than the corresponding adsorption time. The dependence of the adsorption-release performance on pH was demonstrated as well. Confocal microscopy images allowed us to probe the different distribution of labeled proteins inside the NMP. The safety and non-cytotoxicity of NMPs were evaluated after incubation with fibroblast 3T3 cells and showed that all types of NMPs did not adversely affect the cell viability for concentrations up to 2.25 μg/mL and an exposure time up to 120 h. Confocal microscopy imaging revealed also the effective interaction between NMPs and fibroblast 3T3 cells. Overall, this study describes a rapid, versatile, and facile approach for preparing a universal non-toxic, nanoporous carrier for protein delivery under physiological conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Glyconanomaterials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Cyclodextrin-Based Functional Glyconanomaterials
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(12), 2517; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10122517 - 15 Dec 2020
Viewed by 457
Abstract
Cyclodextrins (CDs) have long occupied a prominent position in most pharmaceutical laboratories as “off-the-shelve” tools to manipulate the pharmacokinetics of a broad range of active principles, due to their unique combination of biocompatibility and inclusion abilities. The development of precision chemical methods for [...] Read more.
Cyclodextrins (CDs) have long occupied a prominent position in most pharmaceutical laboratories as “off-the-shelve” tools to manipulate the pharmacokinetics of a broad range of active principles, due to their unique combination of biocompatibility and inclusion abilities. The development of precision chemical methods for their selective functionalization, in combination with “click” multiconjugation procedures, have further leveraged the nanoscaffold nature of these oligosaccharides, creating a direct link between the glyco and the nano worlds. CDs have greatly contributed to understand and exploit the interactions between multivalent glycodisplays and carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectins) and to improve the drug-loading and functional properties of nanomaterials through host–guest strategies. The whole range of capabilities can be enabled through self-assembly, template-assisted assembly or covalent connection of CD/glycan building blocks. This review discusses the advancements made in this field during the last decade and the amazing variety of functional glyconanomaterials empowered by the versatility of the CD component. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Glyconanomaterials)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessReview
Glycan Nanobiosensors
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(7), 1406; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10071406 - 19 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 853
Abstract
This review paper comprehensively summarizes advances made in the design of glycan nanobiosensors using diverse forms of nanomaterials. In particular, the paper covers the application of gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles, carbon nanoparticles, hybrid types of nanoparticles, proteins as nanoscaffolds and various [...] Read more.
This review paper comprehensively summarizes advances made in the design of glycan nanobiosensors using diverse forms of nanomaterials. In particular, the paper covers the application of gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles, carbon nanoparticles, hybrid types of nanoparticles, proteins as nanoscaffolds and various nanoscale-based approaches to designing such nanoscale probes. The article covers innovative immobilization strategies for the conjugation of glycans on nanoparticles. Summaries of the detection schemes applied, the analytes detected and the key operational characteristics of such nanobiosensors are provided in the form of tables for each particular type of nanomaterial. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Glyconanomaterials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop