Special Issue "Carbon Nanotube: Synthesis, Characteristics and Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 July 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Slawomir Boncel
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Organic Chemistry, Bioorganic Chemistry and Biotechnology, Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland
Interests: c-CVD synthesis; physicochemistry of carbon nanotubes and other carbon sp2-allotropes; nanocomposites/nanohybrids of enhanced mechanical, thermal, electrical and/or magnetic properties; nano(bio)catalysis; magnetically targeted drug delivery dystems; materials for military/civil engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanotechnology as penetrating physics, chemistry, biology and formulating many new laws, such as ballistic electron transport, nanocatalysis, quantum effects, superparamagnetism or enhanced molecule-cell interactions, works at the atomic and subatomic scales. One of the greatest breakthroughs nanotechnology owes to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which display the unique combination of superb properties. For example, individual CNTs of well-defined chirality exhibit ‘zero-loss’ electroconductivity, excellent thermal conductivity, extraordinary mechanical strength and tailorable optical properties. It is therefore not surprising that ‘re-discovery’ of CNTs by Iijima has initiated an avalanche of the interdisciplinary research. Indeed, since 1991 on, CNTs has been promising to realize numerous applications in a range of distant areas.

Nevertheless, only a rather small fraction of the promises has been fulfilled in the every-day or scaled-up implementations and many more are still awaiting to come. One of the most challenging problems of transfer the extraordinary properties of CNTs from nano- to macro-scale is control over their chirality, morphology and surface physicochemistry. On the one hand, individualization of pre-defined CNTs as key added-value components in complex systems and hybrid materials plays a vital role. This is particularly true in the manufacture of CNT-based composites of enhanced mechanical, thermal and/or electrical properties. Also ‘debundling’ of CNT agglomerates is crucial in biomedical applications like targeted drug/gene delivery systems or theranostics. On the other hand, assembling of CNTs into desired forms and geometries of superior electrical, thermal and mechanical properties would require ‘infinitely’-long CNTs.

The titled Special Issue intends to cover the up-to-date studies on CNTs focused on their applications achievable by the ‘properties-by-design’ approach. Novel strategies of controllable synthesis, original physicochemical modifications or innovative isolation/purification methods accompanied by comprehensive characterization toward applications constitute the cutting-edge science and this Special Issue as well. New openings or the most recent advances in the applications of CNTs – from (opto)electronics to thermal management to materials engineering to biomedicine – are the most welcome.

Dr. Slawomir Boncel
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Synthesis routes
  • Surface functionalization
  • Purification/isolation methods
  • Physicochemical characterization
  • Nanocatalysis
  • Nanomaterials for biomedicine
  • Nanomaterials for energy applications
  • Electrical and thermal properties

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Enhanced Detection Systems of Filling Rates Using Carbon Nanotube Cement Grout
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10010010 - 18 Dec 2019
Abstract
The addition of small amounts of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to cement-based materials modifies their thermal and electrical characteristics. This study investigated the void detection and filling rates of cement grout with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). MWCNT grouts of 40 mm × 40 mm [...] Read more.
The addition of small amounts of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to cement-based materials modifies their thermal and electrical characteristics. This study investigated the void detection and filling rates of cement grout with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). MWCNT grouts of 40 mm × 40 mm × 160 mm were fabricated. Specimens were tested by thermal imaging, electrical resistance analyses, and magnetic field tests. The experimental parameters were the concentration of MWCNT and the grout filling rate. The filling rate was investigated by measuring resistance and magnetic field changes with respect to cross-sectional area, taking the voids into consideration. The results of the thermal image tests indicate that 1.0 wt % MWCNT cement grout is optimal for void detection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Nanotube: Synthesis, Characteristics and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Ullmann Reactions of Carbon Nanotubes—Advantageous and Unexplored Functionalization toward Tunable Surface Chemistry
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(11), 1619; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9111619 - 15 Nov 2019
Abstract
We demonstrate Ullmann-type reactions as novel and advantageous functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) toward tunable surface chemistry. The functionalization routes comprise O-, N-, and C-arylation of chlorinated CNTs. We confirm the versatility and efficiency of the reaction allowing functionalization degrees [...] Read more.
We demonstrate Ullmann-type reactions as novel and advantageous functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) toward tunable surface chemistry. The functionalization routes comprise O-, N-, and C-arylation of chlorinated CNTs. We confirm the versatility and efficiency of the reaction allowing functionalization degrees up to 3.5 mmol g−1 by applying both various nanotube substrates, i.e., single-wall (SWCNTs) and multi-wall CNTs (MWCNTs) of various chirality, geometry, and morphology as well as diverse Ullmann-type reagents: phenol, aniline, and iodobenzene. The reactivity of nanotubes was correlatable with the nanotube diameter and morphology revealing SWCNTs as the most reactive representatives. We have determined the optimized conditions of this two-step synthetic protocol as: (1) chlorination using iodine trichloride (ICl3), and (2) Ullmann-type reaction in the presence of: copper(I) iodide (CuI), 1,10-phenanthroline as chelating agent and caesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) as base. We have analyzed functionalized CNTs using a variety of techniques, i.e., scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, comprehensive Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The analyses confirmed the purely covalent nature of those modifications at all stages. Eventually, we have proved the elaborated protocol as exceptionally tunable since it enabled us: (a) to synthesize superhydrophilic films from—the intrinsically hydrophobic—vertically aligned MWCNT arrays and (b) to produce printable highly electroconductive pastes of enhanced characteristics—as compared for non-modified and otherwise modified MWCNTs—for textronics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Nanotube: Synthesis, Characteristics and Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Ultrafast Patterning Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Forest on Al Foil and Si Substrate Using Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD)
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(9), 1332; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9091332 - 18 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study introduces a method of patterning carbon nanotube (CNTs) forests that is both fast and simple. We found that, as commercially available oil-based markers undergo nanotube synthesis, a thin film forms that prevents the catalyst, ferrocene, from coming into contact with the [...] Read more.
This study introduces a method of patterning carbon nanotube (CNTs) forests that is both fast and simple. We found that, as commercially available oil-based markers undergo nanotube synthesis, a thin film forms that prevents the catalyst, ferrocene, from coming into contact with the surface of the test sample. This, thus, blocks CNT growth. Through further deduction, we used styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) to conduct CNT patterning, in addition to analyzing the relationship between the weight percent concentration of the SMA and the extent to which it blocked CNT growth. We developed two separate methods for applying ink to soft and hard substrates: one method involved ink printing and the other laser stripping. In the CNT pattern we produced, a minimum line width of around 10 µm was attained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Nanotube: Synthesis, Characteristics and Applications)
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