Special Issue "Advanced Biocompatible Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 August 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Chiara Battocchio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Science, Roma Tre University, 00146 Roma, Italy
Interests: molecular and electronic structure of nanostructured materials carried out by state-of-the-art Synchrotron Radiation (SR)-induced techniques such as X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (SR-XPS), X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), and Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS), as well as conventional XPS, UV–visible absorption and emission and FT-IR spectroscopies. Main topics of research are metal nanoparticles stabilized by organic molecules and biomolecules for technological applications and biocompatible materials for tissue engineering applications
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A biomaterial is a system that has been engineered to take a form able to direct the course of diagnostic or therapeutic procedures by controlling its interactions with the living body. In this wide field of research, nanostructured biomaterials able to conjugate the chemico-physical properties typical of nano-objects with biocompatibility are appealing candidates to design and realize innovative materials for applications in biomedicine. Since the interactions arising at the interface between a biomaterial and the living body are of primary importance for the biomaterial applicability, the study of the chemical and molecular structure of the material surface is of outmost importance for developing innovative and functional biomaterials.

In this context, the aim of this Special Issue is to provide a peer-reviewed forum for the publication of original papers dealing with the most important issues regarding the design, production, and structural investigation of innovative biomaterials and covering the wide range of physical, biological, and chemical sciences that underpin the design of nanostructured biomaterials and the investigation of their surfaces as well as of the interactions occurring at the biomaterial–host interface.

Prof. Chiara Battocchio
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • biocompatible materials
  • bioactive materials
  • biomimetic materials
  • nanostructured surfaces
  • functionalized surfaces
  • interfaces
  • tissue engineering
  • regenerative medicine
  • surfaces/interfaces characterization

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Fibrillar Self-Assembly of a Chimeric Elastin-Resilin Inspired Engineered Polypeptide
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(11), 1613; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9111613 - 14 Nov 2019
Abstract
In the field of tissue engineering, recombinant protein-based biomaterials made up of block polypeptides with tunable properties arising from the functionalities of the individual domains are appealing candidates for the construction of medical devices. In this work, we focused our attention on the [...] Read more.
In the field of tissue engineering, recombinant protein-based biomaterials made up of block polypeptides with tunable properties arising from the functionalities of the individual domains are appealing candidates for the construction of medical devices. In this work, we focused our attention on the preparation and structural characterization of nanofibers from a chimeric-polypeptide-containing resilin and elastin domain, designed on purpose to enhance its cell-binding ability by introducing a specific fibronectin-derived Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence. The polypeptide ability to self-assemble was investigated. The molecular and supramolecular structure was characterized by Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), circular dichroism, state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation-induced techniques X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). The attained complementary results allow us to assess as H-bonds influence the morphology of the aggregates obtained after the self-assembling of the chimeric polypeptide. Finally, a preliminary investigation of the potential cytotoxicity of the polypeptide was performed by culturing human fetal foreskin fibroblast (HFFF2) for its use as biomedical device. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biocompatible Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
The Preparation and Properties of Multilayer Cu-MTa2O5 Composite Coatings on Ti6Al4V for Biomedical Applications
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1498; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101498 - 21 Oct 2019
Abstract
For the enhancement of the anticorrosion and antibacterial performance of the biomedical alloy Ti6Al4V, a novel Cu incorporated multilayer Ta2O5ceramic composite coating Cu-Ta2O5/Ta2O5/Ta2O5-TiO2/TiO2/Ti [...] Read more.
For the enhancement of the anticorrosion and antibacterial performance of the biomedical alloy Ti6Al4V, a novel Cu incorporated multilayer Ta2O5ceramic composite coating Cu-Ta2O5/Ta2O5/Ta2O5-TiO2/TiO2/Ti (coating codeCu-MTa2O5) was developed by radio frequency (RF) and direct current (DC) reactive magnetron sputtering. Meanwhile, to better display the multilayer Ta2O5 coating mentioned above, a monolayer Ta2O5 ceramic coating was deposited onto the surface of Ti6Al4V alloy as a reference. The surface morphology, microstructure, phase constituents, and elemental states of the coating were evaluated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The adhesion strength, wettability, anticorrosion and antibacterial properties of the coating were examined by a scratch tester, contact angle measurement, electrochemical workstations, and plate counting method, respectively. The results showed that the deposited coatings were amorphous and hydrophobic. Cu doped into the Ta2O5 coating existed as CuO and Cu2O. A Ta2O5-TiO2/TiO2/Ti multi-interlayer massively enhanced the adhesion strength of the coating, which was 2.9 times stronger than that of the monolayer Ta2O5coating. The multilayer Cu-MTa2O5 coating revealed a higher corrosion potential and smaller corrosion current density as compared to the uncoated Ti6Al4V, indicating the better anticorrosion performance of Ti6Al4V. Moreover, a 99.8% antibacterial effect of Cu-MTa2O5 coated against Staphylococcus aureuswas obtained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biocompatible Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Biocompatible and Biodegradable Magnesium Oxide Nanoparticles with In Vitro Photostable Near-Infrared Emission: Short-Term Fluorescent Markers
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1360; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101360 - 23 Sep 2019
Abstract
Imaging of biological matter by using fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) is becoming a widespread method for in vitro imaging. However, currently there is no fluorescent NP that satisfies all necessary criteria for short-term in vivo imaging: biocompatibility, biodegradability, photostability, suitable wavelengths of absorbance and [...] Read more.
Imaging of biological matter by using fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) is becoming a widespread method for in vitro imaging. However, currently there is no fluorescent NP that satisfies all necessary criteria for short-term in vivo imaging: biocompatibility, biodegradability, photostability, suitable wavelengths of absorbance and fluorescence that differ from tissue auto-fluorescence, and near infrared (NIR) emission. In this paper, we report on the photoluminescent properties of magnesium oxide (MgO) NPs that meet all these criteria. The optical defects, attributed to vanadium and chromium ion substitutional defects, emitting in the NIR, are observed at room temperature in NPs of commercial and in-house ball-milled MgO nanoparticles, respectively. As such, the NPs have been successfully integrated into cultured cells and photostable bright in vitro emission from NPs was recorded and analyzed. We expect that numerous biotechnological and medical applications will emerge as this nanomaterial satisfies all criteria for short-term in vivo imaging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biocompatible Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Biosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Mediated by Extracellular Pigment from Talaromyces purpurogenus and Their Biomedical Applications
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(7), 1042; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9071042 - 21 Jul 2019
Abstract
In recent years, green syntheses have been researched comprehensively to develop inexpensive and eco-friendly approaches for the generation of nanoparticles. In this context, plant and microbial sources are being examined to discover potential reducing agents. This study aims to utilize an extracellular pigment [...] Read more.
In recent years, green syntheses have been researched comprehensively to develop inexpensive and eco-friendly approaches for the generation of nanoparticles. In this context, plant and microbial sources are being examined to discover potential reducing agents. This study aims to utilize an extracellular pigment produced by Talaromyces purpurogenus as a prospective reducing agent to synthesize silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Biosynthesized AgNPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), electron probe micro analyser (EPMA), and zeta potential. The pigment functional groups involved in the generation of AgNPs were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. TEM images showed that the generated nanoparticles were spherical, hexagonal, rod-shaped, and triangular-shaped with a particle size distribution from 4 to 41 nm and exhibited a surface plasmon resonance at around 410 nm. DLS and zeta potential studies revealed that the particles were polydispersed and stable (−24.8 mV). EPMA confirmed the presence of elemental silver in the samples. Biosynthesized AgNPs exhibited minimum inhibitory concentrations of 32 and 4 μg/mL against E. coli and S. epidermidis, respectively. Further, cytotoxicity of the AgNPs was investigated against human cervical cancer (HeLa), human liver cancer (HepG2), and human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cell lines using 5-fluorouracil as a positive control. A significant activity was recorded against HepG2 cell line with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 11.1 μg/mL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Biocompatible Nanomaterials)
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