Innovative Biomedical Applications of Laser-Generated Colloids

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 3979

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 1, I-35131 Padua, Italy
Interests: metal nanoparticles; nanoalloys; oxide nanoparticles; laser synthesis and processing of colloids; laser ablation in liquid; plasmonics; nanomedicine; SERS; heterogeneous catalysis; self-healing nanomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the years, the laser synthesis and processing of colloids (LSPC) has grown significantly in importance, generating several examples of the successful application of colloids in various scientific and technological fields. Among them, the biomedical sector is receiving important contributions from the LSPC. With the improvement in synthesis control, the progress in the understanding of the process, and the expansion of the set of nanomaterials available by laser synthesis, the LSPC community has shown that it can provide effective and innovative solutions for biosensors, nanocomposite biomaterials, bioactive surfaces, antimicrobial agents, protein and biomolecule detection, multifunctional drug delivery, nanodrugs, and diagnostic and therapeutic agents, up to biodegradable inorganic nanomedicines.

We would like to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue of Nanomaterials, which aims to present the latest research breakthroughs in areas relevant to the development of innovative biomedical applications of laser-generated colloids. This issue will bring together innovations in both the development of nanoparticles and their application in the biological or medical fields, by including manuscripts on the most important results achieved by LSPC researchers. By presenting a collection of recent advances from the LSPC community, we aim to further promote the emergence of new concepts and the progress of laser-generated colloids toward real-world biomedical use.

Prof. Dr. Vincenzo Amendola
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • nanoparticles, laser synthesis
  • laser ablation
  • laser irradiation
  • nanomedicine
  • biosensors
  • theranostics
  • bioimaging
  • drug delivery
  • antimicrobial
  • antibacterial
  • nanocomposites
  • contrast agents

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 4004 KiB  
Article
Merging of Bi-Modality of Ultrafast Laser Processing: Heating of Si/Au Nanocomposite Solutions with Controlled Chemical Content
by Yury V. Ryabchikov, Inam Mirza, Miroslava Flimelová, Antonin Kana and Oleksandr Romanyuk
Nanomaterials 2024, 14(4), 321; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano14040321 - 6 Feb 2024
Viewed by 896
Abstract
Ultrafast laser processing possesses unique outlooks for the synthesis of novel nanoarchitectures and their further applications in the field of life science. It allows not only the formation of multi-element nanostructures with tuneable performance but also provides various non-invasive laser-stimulated modalities. In this [...] Read more.
Ultrafast laser processing possesses unique outlooks for the synthesis of novel nanoarchitectures and their further applications in the field of life science. It allows not only the formation of multi-element nanostructures with tuneable performance but also provides various non-invasive laser-stimulated modalities. In this work, we employed ultrafast laser processing for the manufacturing of silicon–gold nanocomposites (Si/Au NCs) with the Au mass fraction variable from 15% (0.5 min ablation time) to 79% (10 min) which increased their plasmonic efficiency by six times and narrowed the bandgap from 1.55 eV to 1.23 eV. These nanostructures demonstrated a considerable fs laser-stimulated hyperthermia with a Au-dependent heating efficiency (~10–20 °C). The prepared surfactant-free colloidal solutions showed good chemical stability with a decrease (i) of zeta (ξ) potential (from −46 mV to −30 mV) and (ii) of the hydrodynamic size of the nanoparticles (from 104 nm to 52 nm) due to the increase in the laser ablation time from 0.5 min to 10 min. The electrical conductivity of NCs revealed a minimum value (~1.53 µS/cm) at 2 min ablation time while their increasing concentration was saturated (~1012 NPs/mL) at 7 min ablation duration. The formed NCs demonstrated a polycrystalline Au nature regardless of the laser ablation time accompanied with the coexistence of oxidized Au and oxidized Si as well as gold silicide phases at a shorter laser ablation time (<1 min) and the formation of a pristine Au at a longer irradiation. Our findings demonstrate the merged employment of ultrafast laser processing for the design of multi-element NCs with tuneable properties reveal efficient composition-sensitive photo-thermal therapy modality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Biomedical Applications of Laser-Generated Colloids)
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18 pages, 2899 KiB  
Article
Cytotoxicity of PEG-Coated Gold and Gold–Iron Alloy Nanoparticles: ROS or Ferroptosis?
by Clara M. G. de Faria, Michael Bissoli, Riccardo Vago, Antonello E. Spinelli and Vincenzo Amendola
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(23), 3044; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13233044 - 29 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1117
Abstract
Nanomedicine relies on the exploitation of nanoscale constructs for therapeutic and diagnostic functions. Gold and gold–iron alloy nanoparticles (NPs) are two examples of nanomaterials with favorable features for use in nanomedicine. While gold NPs have been studied extensively in the last decades, they [...] Read more.
Nanomedicine relies on the exploitation of nanoscale constructs for therapeutic and diagnostic functions. Gold and gold–iron alloy nanoparticles (NPs) are two examples of nanomaterials with favorable features for use in nanomedicine. While gold NPs have been studied extensively in the last decades, they are not biodegradable. Nonetheless, biodegradation was recently observed in gold alloys with iron obtained using laser ablation in liquid (LAL). Hence, there is a significant interest in the study of the biological effects of gold and gold–iron alloy nanoparticles, starting from their tolerability and cytotoxicity. In this study, these two classes of NPs, obtained via LAL and coated with biocompatible polymers such as polyethylene glycol, were investigated in terms of their cytotoxicity in fibroblasts, prostate cancer cells (PC3) and embryonic kidney cells (HEK). We also explored the effects of different synthetic procedures, stabilizing additives, and the possible mechanisms behind cell mortality such as the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or ferroptosis. NPs larger than 200 nm were associated with lower cell tolerability. The most tolerable formulations were pure PEG-Au NPs, followed by PEG-Au–Fe NPs with a hydrodynamic size < 50 nm, which displayed a toxicity of only 20% in fibroblasts after 72 h of incubation. In addition, tumor cells and highly proliferating HEK cells are more sensitive to the NPs than fibroblasts. However, a protective effect of catalase was found for cells incubated with PEG-Au–Fe NPs, indicating an important role of hydrogen peroxide in alloy NP interactions with cells. These results are crucial for directing future synthetic efforts for the realization of biocompatible Au NPs and biodegradable and cytocompatible Au–Fe alloy NPs. Moreover, the correlation of the cytocompatibility of NPs with ROS and ferroptosis in cells is of general interest and applicability to other types of nanomaterials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Biomedical Applications of Laser-Generated Colloids)
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12 pages, 6387 KiB  
Article
Synthesis of Antibacterial Copper Oxide Nanoparticles by Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquids: Potential Application against Foodborne Pathogens
by Tina Hesabizadeh, Kidon Sung, Miseon Park, Steven Foley, Angel Paredes, Stephen Blissett and Gregory Guisbiers
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(15), 2206; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13152206 - 29 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1402
Abstract
Spherical copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO/Cu2O NPs) were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL). The copper target was totally submerged in deionized (DI) water and irradiated by an infrared laser beam at 1064 nm for 30 min. The NPs were [...] Read more.
Spherical copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO/Cu2O NPs) were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL). The copper target was totally submerged in deionized (DI) water and irradiated by an infrared laser beam at 1064 nm for 30 min. The NPs were then characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) to determine their size distribution and concentration, respectively. The phases of copper oxide were identified by Raman spectroscopy. Then, the antibacterial activity of CuO/Cu2O NPs against foodborne pathogens, such as Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Typhimurium DT7, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shigella sonnei ATCC 9290, Yersinia enterocolitica ATCC 27729, Vibrio parahaemolyticus ATCC 49398, Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778, and Listeria monocytogenes EGD, was tested. At a 3 ppm concentration, the CuO/Cu2O NPs exhibited an outstanding antimicrobial effect by killing most bacteria after 5 h incubation at 25 °C. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) confirmed that the CuO/Cu2O NPs destructed the bacterial cell wall. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Biomedical Applications of Laser-Generated Colloids)
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