Special Issue "Toxicological Impact of Nanomaterials on Plants"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Ruth Pereira
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
GreenUPorto – Sustainable Agrifood Production Research Center & Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences of the University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre s/n, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal
Interests: soils quality; ecotoxicology; nanotoxicology; risk assessment
Prof. Fernanda Fidalgo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
GreenUPorto – Sustainable Agrifood Production Research Center & Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences of the University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre s/n, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal
Interests: plant abiotic stress; nano-phytotoxicity; oxidative stress; antioxidant system

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, the Anthropocene, a new epoch dating from the significant anthropogenic impact on Earth's dynamics, can also be regarded as the miniaturization and the nanofabrication era, as Man needs to firmly react to the requirements of an exponentially growing and each day more technologically-dependent human population, under a resource-depletion reality. Miniaturization and nanofabrication benefit from enhanced scientific and technical capabilities to manufacture materials (with less than 100 nm in size) in a cheaper, lighter, less energy and raw materials demanding way, but also with enhanced properties and yet more functional. Nanomaterials will be the “emergent contaminants” of a near future, when these compounds start to appear in the environment at analytical detectable and hazardous levels. Actually, this phenomenon will be registered even sooner for those nanomaterials developed for intentional environmental applications (e.g., crop protection and fertilization, soils and water remediation). Among other organisms, plants will be the target, as well as the biological receptors, of nanomaterials and, given their sessile nature, plants will have to integrate this stressor with many others (e.g., drought, salinity, lack of nutrients, flooding, extreme temperatures, high light intensity, UV radiation and new pests) that are already challenging the diversity and the resilience of natural communities and crops. Thus, knowledge gaps in the uptake, modes-of-action, compartmentalization and biochemical and molecular responses of primary producers to nanomaterials need to be fulfilled. This Special Issue concretely aims to contribute for this purpose. The scientific community needs to develop methodological approaches capable of enhancing the strength of the evidence produced, as well as to ask the right questions and to plan the experimental designs able to address both causes- and multiple cause-effect relationships. Further, both bottom-up and top-down indirect effects on plants and their interactors need to be unraveled for revealing more complex effects (e.g., both positive and negative) of nanomaterials on primary producers and on the whole trophic chains, for less uncertain risk assessments and to better support their safe use.

Prof. Ruth Pereira
Prof. Fernanda Fidalgo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • combined stressors
  • modes-of-action
  • molecular mechanisms
  • biochemical studies
  • stress
  • beneficial effects
  • indirect effects

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Exogenous Production of Silver Nanoparticles by Tephrosia apollinea Living Plants under Drought Stress and Their Antimicrobial Activities
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(12), 1716; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9121716 - 01 Dec 2019
Abstract
Nanoparticle (NP) synthesis by biological systems is more cost-effective, safe, and environmentally friendly when compared to currently used chemical and physical methods. Although many studies have utilized different plant extracts to synthesize NPs, few studies have incorporated living plants. In this study, silver [...] Read more.
Nanoparticle (NP) synthesis by biological systems is more cost-effective, safe, and environmentally friendly when compared to currently used chemical and physical methods. Although many studies have utilized different plant extracts to synthesize NPs, few studies have incorporated living plants. In this study, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized exogenously by Tephrosia apollinea living plant system under the combined stresses of silver nitrate and different levels of drought stress simulated by Polyethylene glycol (PEG) (0, −0.1, −0.2, and −0.4 MPa for three and six days). Biomass, cell death, and H2O2 content were evaluated to determine the toxicological effect of the treatments on the plant. More severe effects were detected in day 6 plants compared to day 3 plants, and at higher drought levels. UV-visible spectrum, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to detect and characterize the T. apollinea synthesized NPs. The shapes of the NPs were spherical and cubic with different phytochemicals being the possible capping agents. Broth microdilution was used to determine the antimicrobial activity of the NPs against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. In this case, antimicrobial activity increased at higher PEG concentrations. Bactericidal effects were observed against E. coli, while only bacteriostatic effects were detected against S. aureus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toxicological Impact of Nanomaterials on Plants)
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