Special Issue "Latest Developments in Photocatalytic Materials and Processes"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy and Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Imre Miklós Szilágyi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest, Hungary
Interests: materials science; nanotechnology; analytical chemistry; photocatalysis; gas sensing; nanofluids; atomic layer deposition; nanocomposites
Dr. Klára Hernádi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary
Interests: heterogeneous catalysis; photocatalytic materials; carbon nanotubes; nanocomposite materials; immobilization of biologically active units
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Photocatalysis, which uses solar energy as a renewable source, is one of the most promising technologies for the elimination of toxic compounds from water, due to its advantages of high activity, photochemical stability, and cost-efficiency. Beside aqueous applications, it can also significantly increase indoor air quality, addressing the so-called “sick building syndrome” and contribute to eliminating pollutants like VOCs both indoors and outdoors. Besides oxidation, photocatalytic reduction of harmful molecules (e.g., NOx) is an emerging field.

Photocatalytic synthesis is also a major green chemistry field, ranging from artificial photosynthesis of converting CO2 and H2O into organic raw molecules to performing photocatalytic synthetic versions of more sophisticated organic processes.

Many exciting materials and processes have recently appeared in photocatalytic research, including photonic bandgap structures and all-organic photocatalysts.

Using computational chemistry and applying extreme laser infrastructure to understanding the photon absorption, excitation, and dissipation processes as well as the occurring photochemical reactions are also hot topics in this field.

A great challenge of photocatalytic materials is to increase their selectivity, robustness, and electron–hole lifetime as well as to achieve a more optimal use of the solar spectrum.

Although there are already some practical, real-life applications, major breakthroughs leading to the everyday use of photocatalysis are still awaited. For this, new laboratory and scaled-up setups and processes are needed, with robust catalysts and reactors.

The present Special Issue aims to collect studies and results detailing the latest developments in the field of photocatalysis.

Dr. Imre Miklós Szilágyi
Dr. Klára Hernádi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • photocatalysis
  • decontamination
  • synthesis
  • nanotechnology
  • nanocomposites
  • visible
  • UV

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Comparing the Degradation Potential of Copper(II), Iron(II), Iron(III) Oxides, and Their Composite Nanoparticles in a Heterogeneous Photo-Fenton System
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(1), 225; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11010225 - 16 Jan 2021
Viewed by 358
Abstract
Heterogeneous photo-Fenton systems offer efficient solutions for the treatment of wastewaters in the textile industry. This study investigated the fabrication and structural characterization of novel peculiar-shaped CuIIO, FeIII2O3, and FeIIO nanoparticles (NPs) compared to [...] Read more.
Heterogeneous photo-Fenton systems offer efficient solutions for the treatment of wastewaters in the textile industry. This study investigated the fabrication and structural characterization of novel peculiar-shaped CuIIO, FeIII2O3, and FeIIO nanoparticles (NPs) compared to the properties of the iron(II)-doped copper ferrite CuII0.4FeII0.6FeIII2O4. The photocatalytic efficiencies of these NPs and the composite of the simple oxides (CuIIO/FeIIO/FeIII2O3) regarding the degradation of methylene blue (MB) and rhodamine B (RhB) as model dyes were also determined. The catalysts were synthesized via simple co-precipitation and calcination technique. X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) were utilized for structural characterization. The structure of CuIIO was bead-like connected into threads, FeIII2O3 was rod-like, while FeIIO pallet-like, with average crystallite sizes of 18.9, 36.9, and 37.1 nm, respectively. The highest degradation efficiency was achieved by CuIIO for RhB and by CuII0.4FeII0.6FeIII2O4 for MB. The CuIIO/FeIIO/FeIII2O3 composite proved to be the second-best catalyst in both cases, with excellent reusability. Hence, these NPs can be successfully applied as heterogeneous photo-Fenton catalysts for the removal of hazardous pollutants. Moreover, the simple metal oxides and the iron(II)-doped copper ferrite displayed a sufficient antibacterial activity against Gram-negative Vibrio fischeri. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Developments in Photocatalytic Materials and Processes)
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Open AccessArticle
Electric and Photocatalytic Properties of Graphene Oxide Depending on the Degree of Its Reduction
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(11), 2313; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10112313 - 22 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 577
Abstract
When graphene oxide is reduced, the functional groups are released and the structure becomes more ordered. The degree of reduction might be tunable with the process parameters. In our work, graphene oxide is prepared and the effect of thermal and chemical reduction is [...] Read more.
When graphene oxide is reduced, the functional groups are released and the structure becomes more ordered. The degree of reduction might be tunable with the process parameters. In our work, graphene oxide is prepared and the effect of thermal and chemical reduction is investigated. The samples are characterized with TG/DTA-MS, SEM-EDX, TEM, XPS, ATR-FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and XRD. Their electrical resistance, cyclic voltammetry and photocatalytic activity data are investigated. The conductivity can be varied by several orders of magnitude, offering a tool to match its electrical properties to certain applications. Low temperature reduction in air offers a material with the highest capacitance, which might be used in supercapacitors. The bare graphene oxide has considerably larger photocatalytic activity than P25 TiO2. Reduction decreases the activity, meaning that reduced graphene oxide can be used as an electron sink in composite photocatalysts, but does not contribute to the photocatalytic activity by itself. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Developments in Photocatalytic Materials and Processes)
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Open AccessArticle
Innovative and Cost-Efficient BiOI Immobilization Technique on Ceramic Paper—Total Coverage and High Photocatalytic Activity
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(10), 1959; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10101959 - 01 Oct 2020
Viewed by 498
Abstract
In the present work, visible light active bismuth oxyiodide (BiOI) was immobilized on a commercial, non-conductive support (an Al2O3 based ceramic paper) using a novel two-step spray coating technique and investigated with different characterization methods (e.g., SEM, Raman, XPS). Our [...] Read more.
In the present work, visible light active bismuth oxyiodide (BiOI) was immobilized on a commercial, non-conductive support (an Al2O3 based ceramic paper) using a novel two-step spray coating technique and investigated with different characterization methods (e.g., SEM, Raman, XPS). Our main goal was to eliminate the separation costs after the photocatalytic measurement and investigate the chemical relevance and opportunity to use this technique in the industry. Our as-prepared uniform BiOI layer had similar properties to the well-known reference BiOI powder. The Raman and XPS measurements confirmed that the enriched amount of the surface iodine defined the color and as well the band gap of the BiOI layer. The durable BiOI layers have prominent photocatalytic activity under UV and visible light irradiation as well. The scale-up procedure proved that the designed BiOI coated paper was reusable and potentially applicable in the industry by straightforward scale-up, which is due to the elaborated non-conventional BiOI coverage estimation method. This immobilization technique could open several opportunities for immobilizing many other visible light active photocatalysts with simple materials and low cost. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Developments in Photocatalytic Materials and Processes)
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