Special Issue "Optics and Transport on 2D Materials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 19 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Juan Francisco Sánchez Royo
Website
Guest Editor
Materials Science Institute of the University of Valencia (ICMUV), c/ Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)
Interests: Synthesis of novel 2D materials and the fundamental understanding of their properties; the development of preparation techniques which may produce large-area crystalline 2D layered materials exhibiting tunable band gaps; the development of doping techniques able to tailor the electronic, optical, and transport properties of 2D layered materials; the electronic and optical characterization of 2D materials and related devices; the development of structures based on 2D materials for optoelectronic applications; the design, development, and characterization of devices combining 2D materials, nanoribbons and/or quantum dots

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The isolation of true two-dimensional materials in 2004, with graphene being the most notable, established a new paradigm in materials science that opened the door to fascinating and promising technical applications in the fields of condensed matter physics, photonics, spintronics, and many others.

A large number of envisaged applications based on two-dimensional materials rely on their outstanding conducting and optical properties, their variety and, as is particularly relevant, the possibility of tuning them, manipulating them (creating quantum emitters, for instance), or even of creating new materials by assembling different two-dimensional materials.

This Special Issue of Nanomaterials aims to publish original high-quality research papers covering the most recent advances as well as comprehensive reviews addressing state-of-the-art topics in the field of optics and transport in two-dimensional materials and related devices.

In addition, opinions and papers on open questions that could provide critical assessments and future directions in this research field are welcome.

This Special Issue will cover the optical and conducting properties of two-dimensional materials and related devices, focusing on the next-generation applications of two-dimensional materials and devices with outstanding performance in terms of applicability. The development of new theoretical and physical models, as well as simulations closer to practical situations, are also expected.

Topics to be covered by this Special Issue include, but are not limited to:

  • Optical and/or transport properties of new two-dimensional materials or systems.
  • Measurements and theoretical development of the optical properties of two-dimensional materials and related devices.
  • Measurements and theoretical development of the electrical properties of two-dimensional materials and related devices.
  • Measurements and theoretical development of the thermal properties of two-dimensional materials and related devices.
  • Modelization and/or characterization of devices based on two-dimensional materials.
  • Experimental and/or theoretical analysis of quantum emitters in two-dimensional systems and related devices.
  • Optical properties of excitons in two-dimensional materials and related devices.
  • Optical and electrical properties of heterostructures based on two-dimensional materials.
  • Electronic properties of two-dimensional materials or systems (including topological insulators).
  • Manipulation and tuning of optical and conducting properties of two-dimensional materials and related devices.
  • New innovative areas of application of two-dimensional systems, including biocompatible aspects.
  • Critical assessments and future directions in two-dimensional systems for sensing.
  • Critical assessments and future directions in two-dimensional systems research.

In advance, we would like to gratefully acknowledge the authors and reviewers who will participate to the elaboration of this Special Issue and who will contribute to the development of fundamental and technological research in two-dimensional systems and related devices.

Prof. Dr. Juan Francisco Sánchez Royo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Long-Term Stabilization of Two-Dimensional Perovskites by Encapsulation with Hexagonal Boron Nitride
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(8), 1120; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9081120 - 03 Aug 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Metal halide perovskites are known to suffer from rapid degradation, limiting their direct applicability. Here, the degradation of phenethylammonium lead iodide (PEA2PbI4) two-dimensional perovskites under ambient conditions was studied using fluorescence, absorbance, and fluorescence lifetime measurements. It was demonstrated [...] Read more.
Metal halide perovskites are known to suffer from rapid degradation, limiting their direct applicability. Here, the degradation of phenethylammonium lead iodide (PEA2PbI4) two-dimensional perovskites under ambient conditions was studied using fluorescence, absorbance, and fluorescence lifetime measurements. It was demonstrated that the long-term stability of two-dimensional perovskites could be achieved through the encapsulation with hexagonal boron nitride. While un-encapsulated perovskite flakes degraded within hours, the encapsulated perovskites were stable for at least three months. In addition, encapsulation considerably improved the stability under laser irradiation. The environmental stability, combined with the improved durability under illumination, is a critical ingredient for thorough spectroscopic studies of the intrinsic optoelectronic properties of this material platform. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optics and Transport on 2D Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Optical Contrast and Raman Spectroscopy Techniques Applied to Few-Layer 2D Hexagonal Boron Nitride
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(7), 1047; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9071047 - 22 Jul 2019
Abstract
The successful integration of few-layer thick hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) into devices based on two-dimensional materials requires fast and non-destructive techniques to quantify their thickness. Optical contrast methods and Raman spectroscopy have been widely used to estimate the thickness of two-dimensional semiconductors and [...] Read more.
The successful integration of few-layer thick hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) into devices based on two-dimensional materials requires fast and non-destructive techniques to quantify their thickness. Optical contrast methods and Raman spectroscopy have been widely used to estimate the thickness of two-dimensional semiconductors and semi-metals. However, they have so far not been applied to two-dimensional insulators. In this work, we demonstrate the ability of optical contrast techniques to estimate the thickness of few-layer hBN on SiO2/Si substrates, which was also measured by atomic force microscopy. Optical contrast of hBN on SiO2/Si substrates exhibits a linear trend with the number of hBN monolayers in the few-layer thickness range. We also used bandpass filters (500–650 nm) to improve the effectiveness of the optical contrast methods for thickness estimations. We also investigated the thickness dependence of the high frequency in-plane E2g phonon mode of atomically thin hBN on SiO2/Si substrates by micro-Raman spectroscopy, which exhibits a weak thickness-dependence attributable to the in-plane vibration character of this mode. Ab initio calculations of the Raman active phonon modes of atomically thin free-standing crystals support these results, even if the substrate can reduce the frequency shift of the E2g phonon mode by reducing the hBN thickness. Therefore, the optical contrast method arises as the most suitable and fast technique to estimate the thickness of hBN nanosheets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optics and Transport on 2D Materials)
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