Special Issue "Frontiers in Nanostructure Stability: Nanocrystalline Materials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Tahir Irfan Khan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Bradford, School of Engineering andInformatics, Bradford, United Kingdom
Interests: Microstructural characterization; Diffusion bonding; Nanostructured coatings; Surface modification; Tribology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Materials that are produced within the nanometer range have been found to possess novel mechanical, chemical, thermal and electrical properties compared to materials prepared on a micron scale. Therefore, by controlling the nanostructure of materials, better properties can be engineered. For instance, ceramic and polymer materials can incorporate carbon nanotubes, which can provide unique electrical and thermal properties. The use of nanoparticles in composites can enhance strength, chemical and thermal resistance, yet reduce weight. The development of nanostructured coatings containing hard ceramic nanoparticles can produce tough and wear-resistant surfaces or change colour when a current is applied or have self-cleaning and antifouling properties. Nanotechnology can be regarded as a key technology which can lead to the development of nanodevices and systems that offer improved properties. Therefore, developments in nanostructured materials not only influence advances in technology, but has economic and social implications.

Prof. Tahir Irfan Khan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanostructure
  • nanoparticles
  • carbon
  • nanotubes nanotechnology
  • coatings
  • nanosurfaces
  • nanoparticles
  • wear resistance
  • nanocomposites.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Fabrication of Interconnected Plasmonic Spherical Silver Nanoparticles with Enhanced Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) Peaks Using Quince Leaf Extract Solution
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(11), 1557; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9111557 - 02 Nov 2019
Abstract
Interconnected spherical metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were synthesized in the current study using a green chemistry method. The reduction of silver ions to Ag NPs was carried out with low-cost and eco-friendly quince leaves. For the first time, it was confirmed that [...] Read more.
Interconnected spherical metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were synthesized in the current study using a green chemistry method. The reduction of silver ions to Ag NPs was carried out with low-cost and eco-friendly quince leaves. For the first time, it was confirmed that the extract solution of quince leaves could be used to perform green production of Ag NPs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was conducted to identify the potential biomolecules that were involved in the Ag NPs. The results depicted that the biosynthesis of Ag NPs through the extract solution of quince leaf was a low-cost, clean, and safe method, which did not make use of any contaminated element and hence, had no undesirable effects. The majority of the peaks in the FTIR spectrum of quince leaf extracts also emerged in the FTIR spectrum of Ag NPs but they were found to be of less severe intensity. The silver ion reduction was elaborated in detail on the basis of the FTIR outcomes. In addition, through X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, the Ag NPs were also confirmed to be crystalline in type, owing to the appearance of distinct peaks related to the Ag NPs. The creation of Ag NPs was furthermore confirmed by using absorption spectrum, in which a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak at 480 nm was observed. The LSPR peak achieved in the present work was found to be of great interest compared to those reported in literature. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images were used to provide the morphology and grain size of Ag NPs. It was shown from the FESEM images that the Ag NPs had interconnected spherical morphology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Nanostructure Stability: Nanocrystalline Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Soldering of Passive Components Using Sn Nanoparticle Reinforced Solder Paste: Influence on Microstructure and Joint Strength
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1478; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101478 - 17 Oct 2019
Abstract
In this study, the effects of adding Sn nanopowder (particle size < 150 nm) to three solder pastes SAC3-X(H)F3+, SCAN-Ge071-XF3+, and water washable WW50-SAC3 are evaluated regarding microstructure, morphology, joint strength, and electrical resistance. The nanopowder was added at a rate of 10% [...] Read more.
In this study, the effects of adding Sn nanopowder (particle size < 150 nm) to three solder pastes SAC3-X(H)F3+, SCAN-Ge071-XF3+, and water washable WW50-SAC3 are evaluated regarding microstructure, morphology, joint strength, and electrical resistance. The nanopowder was added at a rate of 10% by weight and then mechanically mixed until homogenous solder paste was obtained. The results showed that the addition of Sn nanoparticles resulted in homogenous bond formation for SAC-3 and SCAN, while voids and bubbles formation slightly increased within the joint interface for the water washable solder paste. The SCAN + Sn nano reinforced solder paste showed increased variation of joint strength from 12.6 to 39.9 N, while the water washable + Sn nanopowder reinforced solder paste showed less variability in joint strength from 17.3 to 33.9 N. Both sets of solder paste with and without Sn nano reinforced solder paste showed a reliable quality joint under mechanical shock testing after six shocks in six milliseconds with an 87.1 ms pulse duration. The results showed that Sn nanoparticles resulted in a small resistance change, while RDC values (in mΩ) slightly decreased for SAC and increased for SCAN and further increases for water washable solder paste. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Nanostructure Stability: Nanocrystalline Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Nanoparticle Enhanced Eutectic Reaction during Diffusion Brazing of Aluminium to Magnesium
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(3), 370; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9030370 - 05 Mar 2019
Abstract
Diffusion brazing has gained much popularity as a technique capable of joining dissimilar lightweight metal alloys and has the potential for a wide range of applications in aerospace and transportation industries, where microstructural changes that will determine the mechanical and chemical properties of [...] Read more.
Diffusion brazing has gained much popularity as a technique capable of joining dissimilar lightweight metal alloys and has the potential for a wide range of applications in aerospace and transportation industries, where microstructural changes that will determine the mechanical and chemical properties of the final joint must be controlled. This study explores the effect of Al2O3 nanoparticles on the mechanical and microstructural properties of diffusion brazed magnesium (AZ31) and aluminium (Al-1100) joints. The results showed that the addition of Al2O3 nanoparticle to the electrodeposited Cu coating increased the volume of eutectic liquid formed at the interface which caused a change to the bonding mechanism and accelerated the bonding process. When the Cu/Al2O3 nanocomposite coatings were used as the interlayer, a maximum bond strength of 46 MPa was achieved after 2 min bonding time while samples bonded using pure-Cu interlayers achieved maximum strength after 10 min bonding time. Chemical analysis of the bond region confirmed that when short bonding times are used, the intermetallic compounds formed at the interface are limited to the compounds consumed in the eutectic reaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Nanostructure Stability: Nanocrystalline Materials)
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