Special Issue "Ionic Liquid–Polymer-Based Composites"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanocomposite Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 July 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Daniela Correia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre of Physics, Campus Gualtar, University of Minho, Minho, Portugal
Interests: Ionic Liquids; smart and multifunctional materials; polymer-based materials; materials processing; surface treatments; physical chemistry; materials characterization; sensors and actuators
Dr. Javier Reguera
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. BCMaterials, Basque Center for Materials, Applications and Nanostructures, UPV/EHU Science Park, 48940 Leioa, Spain
2. IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48013 Bilbao, Spain
Interests: materials science; solar cells; nanostructure materials; inorganic materials; optoelectronic devices
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ionic Liquids (ILs) (commonly defined as salts composed entirely of cations and anions) have attracted increasing attention for the development of IL–polymer-based composites due to their exciting and unique properties, including high ionic conductivity, high thermal stability, nonflammability, and nonvolatile and negligible vapor pressure.

The incorporation of ILs into a polymer matrix allows developing composites that synergistically combine the IL and polymer features. The possibility to tune the IL properties through the combination of different anions and cations and, additionally, IL modification through the incorporation of functional groups with specific properties into the cation/anion or both allows the development of composites that will meet the demands required for particular applications.

In recent years, interesting and significant efforts have been made in the development of IL–polymer-based composites for a wide range of applications, including sensors and actuators, environment, biomedical applications, and energy generation and storage.

This Special Issue of Nanomaterials aims to cover the recent advances in IL–polymer-based composites materials for advanced applications.

Dr. Daniela Correia
Dr. Javier Reguera
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Ionic Liquids
  • polymers
  • composites
  • materials
  • physical chemistry
  • advanced applications

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Insights into the Structure and Dynamics of Imidazolium Ionic Liquid and Tetraethylene Glycol Dimethyl Ether Cosolvent Mixtures: A Molecular Dynamics Approach
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(10), 2512; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11102512 - 27 Sep 2021
Viewed by 396
Abstract
In this work, the effect of molecular cosolvents tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (TEGDME) on the structure and versatile nature of mixtures of these compounds with imidazolium-based ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6]) is analyzed and discussed at a molecular level by means [...] Read more.
In this work, the effect of molecular cosolvents tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (TEGDME) on the structure and versatile nature of mixtures of these compounds with imidazolium-based ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6]) is analyzed and discussed at a molecular level by means of all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In the whole concentration range of the binary mixtures, the structures and properties evolution was studied by means of systematic molecular dynamics simulations of the fraction of hydrogen bonds, the radial and spatial distribution functions for the various molecular ions and molecular species in the system, together with the snapshots visualization of equilibrated simulation boxes with a color-coding scheme and the rotational dynamics of coumarin 153 (C153) in the binary mixtures. The goal of the work is to provide a molecular-level understanding of significant improvement of ionic conductivity and self-diffusion with the presence of TEGDME as a cosolvent, which causes an enhancement to the ion translational motion and fluidity in the [bmim][PF6] ionic liquids (ILs). Under a mixture concentration change, the microstructure changes of [bmim][PF6] with the TEGDME molar fraction (XTEG) above 0.50 show a slight difference from that of neat [bmim][PF6] IL and concentrated [bmim][PF6]/TEGDME mixture in terms of the radial and spatial distribution functions. The relative diffusivities of solvent molecules to cations as a function of concentration were found to depend on the solvent but not on the anion. A TEGDME increase is found to be advantageous to the dissipation of the polar regions as well as the nonpolar regions in the [bmim][PF6] ionic liquids. These conclusions are consistent with the experimental results, which verified that the unique, complex, and versatile nature of [bmim][PF6]/TEGDME mixture can be correctly modeled and discussed at a molecular level using MD simulation data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ionic Liquid–Polymer-Based Composites)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Ionic Liquid-Based Materials for Biomedical Applications
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(9), 2401; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11092401 - 15 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 695
Abstract
Ionic liquids (ILs) have been extensively explored and implemented in different areas, ranging from sensors and actuators to the biomedical field. The increasing attention devoted to ILs centers on their unique properties and possible combination of different cations and anions, allowing the development [...] Read more.
Ionic liquids (ILs) have been extensively explored and implemented in different areas, ranging from sensors and actuators to the biomedical field. The increasing attention devoted to ILs centers on their unique properties and possible combination of different cations and anions, allowing the development of materials with specific functionalities and requirements for applications. Particularly for biomedical applications, ILs have been used for biomaterials preparation, improving dissolution and processability, and have been combined with natural and synthetic polymer matrixes to develop IL-polymer hybrid materials to be employed in different fields of the biomedical area. This review focus on recent advances concerning the role of ILs in the development of biomaterials and their combination with natural and synthetic polymers for different biomedical areas, including drug delivery, cancer therapy, tissue engineering, antimicrobial and antifungal agents, and biosensing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ionic Liquid–Polymer-Based Composites)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop