Open Framework Materials in the Application of Adsorption, Separation, and Catalysis

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Inorganic Materials and Metal-Organic Frameworks".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 2950

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Material Engineering, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou, China
Interests: functional porous materials; metal-organic frameworks; photocatalysis; electrocatalysis; gas separation

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Guest Editor
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou, China
Interests: metal–organic framework materials; photocatalytic properties; porous materials; adsorption; separation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Open framework materials (OFMs) constitute a large and growing class of nanoporous crystalline structures attracting considerable attention for adsorption, separation, and catalysis. The control of pore structure, adsorption properties, and the nature of the active sites and co-active sites of OFMs is of vital importance for the adsorption, separation, and catalytic performance. This has made them useful in both industrial and academic applications. Together with traditional porous materials, the emerging newly developed porous materials, including Metal–Organic Frameworks (MOFs), Hydrogen-bonded Organic Frameworks (HOFs), Covalent Organic Frameworks (COFs), and Conjugated Microporous Polymers (CMPs), dramatically expand the database of OFMs and the range of applications.

This Special Issue, titled “Open Framework Materials in the Application of Adsorption, Separation, and Catalysis” seeks high-quality works focusing on the latest novel advances of porous materials for adsorption, separation, and catalysis. Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Newly developed OFMs (MOFs, COFs, HOFs, CMPs, etc.);
  • Composites containing OFMs or derivatives originating from OFMs;
  • New technical progress in the forming process of OFMs;
  • OFMs-related characterization techniques;
  • Applications of OFMs, including adsorption, separation, and catalysis;
  • Summary/perspective of recent progress achieved in OFMs and related materials.

Prof. Dr. Junkuo Gao
Prof. Dr. Xusheng Wang
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • metal–organic frameworks (MOFs)
  • hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (HOFs)
  • covalent organic frameworks (COFs)
  • porous materials
  • adsorption
  • separation
  • purification
  • photocatalysis
  • electrocatalysis
  • thermal catalysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 4612 KiB  
Article
Facile Synthesis of Ce-MOF for the Removal of Phosphate, Fluoride, and Arsenic
by Lili Zhang, Decheng Mao, Yining Qu, Xiaohong Chen, Jindi Zhang, Mengyang Huang and Jiaqiang Wang
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(23), 3048; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13233048 - 29 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1111
Abstract
Ce-MOF was synthesized by a solvothermal synthesis method and was used to simultaneously remove phosphate, fluoride and arsenic (V) from water by adsorption. Ce-MOF was characterized by a nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherm, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. The effects of initial concentration, adsorption [...] Read more.
Ce-MOF was synthesized by a solvothermal synthesis method and was used to simultaneously remove phosphate, fluoride and arsenic (V) from water by adsorption. Ce-MOF was characterized by a nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherm, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. The effects of initial concentration, adsorption time, adsorption temperature, pH value and adsorbent on the adsorption properties were investigated. A Langmuir isotherm model was used to fit the adsorption data, and the adsorption capacity of phosphate, fluoride, and arsenic (V) was calculated to be 41.2 mg·g−1, 101.8 mg·g−1 and 33.3 mg·g−1, respectively. Compared with the existing commercially available CeO2 and other MOFs, Ce-MOF has a much higher adsorption capacity. Furthermore, after two reuses, the performance of the adsorbent was almost unchanged, indicating it is a stable adsorbent and has good application potential in the field of wastewater treatment. Full article
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17 pages, 4156 KiB  
Article
Sorption and Desorption of Vapor of n-Pentane by Porphyrin Aluminum Metal–Organic Framework: Mechanism of Bonding, Kinetics and Stoichiometry by Complementary In-Situ Time-Dependent and Ex-Situ Methods
by Georgia-Annicette Banga-Bothy and Alexander Samokhvalov
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(9), 1529; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13091529 - 01 May 2023
Viewed by 1448
Abstract
Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are highly nanostructured coordination polymers that contain metal cations and organic linkers and feature very large pore volumes and surface areas. The sorption and desorption of n-pentane vapor by porphyrin aluminum metal–organic framework Al-MOF-TCPPH2 where TCPPH2 is tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin [...] Read more.
Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are highly nanostructured coordination polymers that contain metal cations and organic linkers and feature very large pore volumes and surface areas. The sorption and desorption of n-pentane vapor by porphyrin aluminum metal–organic framework Al-MOF-TCPPH2 where TCPPH2 is tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin linker were studied by a novel method of in-situ time-dependent attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy in a controlled atmosphere and complementary in-situ and ex-situ methods. Sorption facilely occurs in the flow of dried air, and in the obtained adsorption complex the adsorbate molecules interact with phenyl and carboxylate groups of the linker and the O-H group. Sorption kinetics follows the pseudo-first-order rate law, as confirmed by in-situ time-dependent gravimetry. Further, an ex-situ (static) sorption of n-pentane vapor results in an adsorption complex with as much as 29.1 wt.% n-pentane with the stoichiometric formula [Al-MOF-TCPPH2]2(n-C5H12)7 and a distinct XRD pattern. Finally, in the flow of dried air, the adsorption complex gradually desorbed n-pentane, following the pseudo-first-order rate law. The reversibility of sorption and desorption makes porphyrin aluminum MOF promising for the separation of light hydrocarbons and chemo-sensing. In-situ time-dependent ATR-FTIR spectroscopy in a controlled atmosphere, in combination with in-situ time-dependent gravimetry, is a new approach for the determination of binding sites of sorbents with adsorbate molecules, the stoichiometry of complexes, and chemical kinetics of “solid–gas” interactions. Full article
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