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Special Issue "Stimuli-Responsive Polymeric Materials"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Il Kim

Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan, South Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: controlled polymer synthesis; polymerization catalysis; synthetic polymer bioconjugates; hyperbranched polymers; self-assembly; nanomaterials; hydrogels; biomedical applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The rapidly-growing field of polymer science has come up with many advances in stimuli-responsive nanomaterials by the design and development of multi-functional polymers, novel architectures, and new synthetic approaches for various targeted applications. The nano-assemblies of polymers with a broad range of stimuli, such as pH, temperature, enzyme, light, redox, electric field, magnetic field, etc., have proven to be promising as adaptive shape memory materials, responsive coatings, controlled release materials, self-healing materials and catalysts. The response is evident by the change in conformation or change in solubility of the polymer, resulting in a change in the properties that translated into macroscopic behaviors. Contemporary synthetic protocols coupled with facile characterization and rigorous theoretical advances have conspired to continuously generate stimuli-responsive polymeric nanomaterials that target applications spanning drug delivery, tissue engineering, bio separation, medical diagnostics and biosensors. This Special Issue, entitled “Stimuli-Responsive Polymeric Materials” will cover synthesis of stimuli responsive copolymers with different polymeric architectures like block copolymers, star, graft, dendritic copolymers, etc., their self-assembly, physio-chemical properties in solution, gels and solid state and various applications. Reviews articles by experts in the field will also be welcome.

Prof. Dr. Il Kim
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • stimulus-responsive (co)polymer
  • smart/intelligent materials
  • shape memory materials
  • self-healing materials
  • sensors and biosensors
  • controlled drug delivery
  • artificial muscles and actuators
  • polymer synthesis
  • computer modelling
  • testing methods

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Design of Azomethine Diols for Efficient Self-Healing of Strong Polyurethane Elastomers
Molecules 2018, 23(11), 2928; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23112928
Received: 17 September 2018 / Revised: 6 November 2018 / Accepted: 7 November 2018 / Published: 9 November 2018
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Abstract
Azomethine diols (AMDs) were synthesized by condensation between a terephthalic aldehyde, polyether diamine, and ethanol amine. The synthesized AMDs were employed to introduce azomethine groups into the backbones of polyurethane elastomers (PUEs). Different AMDs were designed to control the concentration and distribution of
[...] Read more.
Azomethine diols (AMDs) were synthesized by condensation between a terephthalic aldehyde, polyether diamine, and ethanol amine. The synthesized AMDs were employed to introduce azomethine groups into the backbones of polyurethane elastomers (PUEs). Different AMDs were designed to control the concentration and distribution of azomethine groups in PUEs. In this study, we explored the intrinsic self-healing of AMD-based PUEs by azomethine metathesis. Particularly, the effects of the concentration and distribution of the azomethine groups on the AMD-based PUEs were considered. Consequently, as the azomethine group concentration increased and the distribution became denser, the self-healing properties improved. With AMD3-40, the self-healing efficiency reached 86% at 130 °C after 30 min. This represents a 150% improvement over the control PUE. Additionally, as the AMD content increased, the mechanical properties improved. With AMD3-40, the tensile strength reached 50 MPa. Therefore, we concluded that the self-healing and mechanical properties of PUEs can potentially be tailored for applications by adjusting the concentration and design of AMD structure for PUEs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stimuli-Responsive Polymeric Materials)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Dexamethasone-Loaded, PEGylated, Vertically Aligned, Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes for Potential Ischemic Stroke Intervention
Molecules 2018, 23(6), 1406; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23061406
Received: 30 April 2018 / Revised: 1 June 2018 / Accepted: 7 June 2018 / Published: 10 June 2018
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Abstract
The complete synthesis, optimization, purification, functionalization and evaluation of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) was reported for potential application in dexamethasone delivery to the ischemic brain tissue. The conditions for high yield were optimized and carbon nanotubes functionalized and PEGylated prior to
[...] Read more.
The complete synthesis, optimization, purification, functionalization and evaluation of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) was reported for potential application in dexamethasone delivery to the ischemic brain tissue. The conditions for high yield were optimized and carbon nanotubes functionalized and PEGylated prior to dexamethasone loading. Morphological changes were confirmed by SEM and TEM. Addition of functional groups to MWCNTs was demonstrated by FTIR. Thermal stability reduced following MWCNTs functionalization as demonstrated in TGA. The presence of carbon at 2θ of 25° and iron at 2θ of 45° in MWCNTs was illustrated by XRD. Polydispersive index and zeta potential were found to be 0.261 and −15.0 mV, respectively. Dexamethasone release increased by 55%, 65% and 95% in pH of 7.4, 6.5 and 5.5 respectively as evaluated by UV-VIS. The functionalized VA-MWCNTs were demonstrated to be less toxic in PC-12 cells in the concentration range from 20 to 20,000 µg/mL. These findings have demonstrated the potential of VA-MWCNTs in the enhancement of fast and prolonged release of dexamethasone which could lead to the effective treatment of ischemic stroke. More work is under way for targeting ischemic sites using atrial natriuretic peptide antibody in stroke rats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stimuli-Responsive Polymeric Materials)
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Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Gold Nanoparticles Grafted with PLL-b-PNIPAM: Interplay on Thermal/pH Dual-Response and Optical Properties
Molecules 2018, 23(4), 921; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23040921
Received: 10 March 2018 / Revised: 9 April 2018 / Accepted: 13 April 2018 / Published: 16 April 2018
PDF Full-text (6957 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Narrowly distributed poly(l-lysine-b-N-isopropylacrylamide) (PLL-b-PNIPAM) was prepared through ring-opening polymerization of ε-benzyloxycarbonyl-l-lysine N-carboxy-α-amino anhydride and atom transfer radical polymerization of NIPAM, followed with the removal of ε-benzyloxycarbonyl group. Then gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) grafted
[...] Read more.
Narrowly distributed poly(l-lysine-b-N-isopropylacrylamide) (PLL-b-PNIPAM) was prepared through ring-opening polymerization of ε-benzyloxycarbonyl-l-lysine N-carboxy-α-amino anhydride and atom transfer radical polymerization of NIPAM, followed with the removal of ε-benzyloxycarbonyl group. Then gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) grafted with PLL-b-PNIPAM (PNIPAM-PLL-AuNPs) were obtained by the reduction of chloroauric acid with sodium citrate in the presence of PLL-b-PNIPAM. PNIPAM-PLL-AuNPs and its precursors were thoroughly characterized by proton magnetic resonance spectroscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, UV-vis spectroscope, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, thermogravimetric analysis, and circular dichroism. The obtained PNIPAM-PLL-AuNPs exhibited high colloid stability even at strong alkaline (pH = 12) and acidic (pH = 2) conditions. The thermal and pH dual-responsive behaviors of the grafting PLL-b-PNIPAM chains was observed to be affected by AuNPs, while not for the secondary structure of PLL chains. Correspondingly, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of AuNPs was found to be sensitive to both pH value and temperature. A blue shift in the SPR happened both with increasing pH value and increasing temperature. The stimuli-response was reversible in heating-cooling cycles. The gold nanoparticles with both pH and temperature response may have potential applications in biomedical areas and biosensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stimuli-Responsive Polymeric Materials)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle An Injectable, Dual Responsive, and Self-Healing Hydrogel Based on Oxidized Sodium Alginate and Hydrazide-Modified Poly(ethyleneglycol)
Molecules 2018, 23(3), 546; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23030546
Received: 6 February 2018 / Revised: 21 February 2018 / Accepted: 28 February 2018 / Published: 1 March 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2793 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Oxidized sodium alginate is a handily modifiable polysaccharide owing to the pendant aldehyde groups which can form dynamic covalent bonds with amines, acylhydrazines, etc., providing oxidized sodium alginate-based hydrogels with stimuli-responsive properties. However, due to the stiffness and, in particular, the hydrophobicity of
[...] Read more.
Oxidized sodium alginate is a handily modifiable polysaccharide owing to the pendant aldehyde groups which can form dynamic covalent bonds with amines, acylhydrazines, etc., providing oxidized sodium alginate-based hydrogels with stimuli-responsive properties. However, due to the stiffness and, in particular, the hydrophobicity of sodium alginate dialdehyde at low pH, the mechanical performance and pH stimuli responsiveness of oxidized sodium alginate-based hydrogels are still strictly limited. Herein, we report a new strategy to build an injectable, dual responsive, and self-healing hydrogel based on oxidized sodium alginate and hydrazide-modified poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG). The hydrazide-modified PEG, referred to as PEG-DTP, acts as a macromolecule crosslinker. We found that the presence of PEG-DTP reduces the hydrophobicity of oxidized sodium alginate at low pH so effectively that even a pH-induced reversible sol-gel transitions can be realized. Meanwhile, the disulfide bonds in PEG-DTP endows the hydrogel with the other reversible sol-gel transitions by redox stimuli. In particular, due to the softness of PEG-DTP chains, mechanical performance was also enhanced significantly. Our results indicate we can easily integrate multi-stimuli responsiveness, injectability, and self-healing behavior together into an oxidized sodium alginate-based hydrogel merely by mixing an oxidized sodium alginate solution with PEG-DTP solution in certain proportions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stimuli-Responsive Polymeric Materials)
Figures

Graphical abstract

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