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Special Issue "Plant Based Chemistry – towards “Green Chemistry 2.0”"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Green Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Elena Ibáñez
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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Foodomics, CIAL, CSIC, Nicolas Cabrera 9, 28049 Madrid, Spain
Interests: foodomics; metabolomics; food science; food bioactivity; food safety; natural compounds; hyphenated techniques; mass spectrometry; advanced analytical techniques; Alzheimer
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Sylvain Antoniotti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institut de Chimie de Nice, UMR 7272 CNRS - Université Cote d'Azur, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice, France
Interests: catalysis; natural feedstocks; synthetic methods; step-economy; flow chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Probably since the discovery of fire, plant-based chemistry has been used as a source of reagents for cosmetics, perfumery, medicine, food, colors and dyes, and building materials. The challenges launched by the urge towards environmental protection and the competitiveness of the globalized market strongly require innovations that break away from the past rather than contribute to a simple continuity. Plant-based chemistry could be one of the solutions from the past for the future of humanity as an ecologic and an economic chemistry, and it could help us turn, in the 21th century, to “Green Chemistry 2.0.”
The present Special Issue aims to collect and to publish recent advances in this interdisciplinary area. Reviews and research articles dealing with innovative techniques, alternative solvents, original procedures, comprehension of intensification mechanisms, by- product valorization, and green impacts and sustainable footprints, starting from production and harvesting of the plant, the transformation processes, solid–liquid extraction and also separation and purification together with formulation and hemi-synthesis are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Farid Chemat
Prof. Dr. Elena Ibáñez
Dr. Sylvain Antoniotti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Plant-based chemistry
  • Green Chemistry
  • Extraction solid-liquid and liquid-liquid
  • separation
  • purification
  • intensification
  • integration
  • enabling technologies
  • natural products
  • compressed fluids (sub- and supercritical)
  • microwave
  • ultrasound
  • hemi-synthesis
  • biorefinery
  • valorization
  • industrial by-products
  • life cycle assessment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Synthetic Mono-Rhamnolipids Display Direct Antifungal Effects and Trigger an Innate Immune Response in Tomato against Botrytis Cinerea
Molecules 2020, 25(14), 3108; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25143108 - 08 Jul 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 886
Abstract
Natural rhamnolipids are potential biocontrol agents for plant protection against bacterial and fungal diseases. In this work, we synthetized new synthetic mono-rhamnolipids (smRLs) consisting in a rhamnose connected to a simple acyl chain and differing by the nature of the link and the [...] Read more.
Natural rhamnolipids are potential biocontrol agents for plant protection against bacterial and fungal diseases. In this work, we synthetized new synthetic mono-rhamnolipids (smRLs) consisting in a rhamnose connected to a simple acyl chain and differing by the nature of the link and the length of the lipid tail. We then investigated the effects of these ether, ester, carbamate or succinate smRL derivatives on Botrytis cinerea development, symptoms spreading on tomato leaves and immune responses in tomato plants. Our results demonstrate that synthetic smRLs are able to trigger early and late immunity-related plant defense responses in tomato and increase plant resistance against B. cinerea in controlled conditions. Structure-function analysis showed that chain length of the lipidic part and type of acyl chain were critical to smRLs immune activity and to the extent of symptoms caused by the fungus on tomato leaves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Based Chemistry – towards “Green Chemistry 2.0”)
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Article
Preparative Separation of Procyanidins from Cocoa Polyphenolic Extract: Comparative Study of Different Fractionation Techniques
Molecules 2020, 25(12), 2842; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25122842 - 19 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 802
Abstract
To provide further insight into the antioxidant potential of procyanidins (PCs) from cocoa beans, PC extract was fractionated by several methodologies, including solid phase extraction, Sephadex LH-20 gel permeation, and preparative HPLC using C18 and diol stationary phases. All the isolated fractions were [...] Read more.
To provide further insight into the antioxidant potential of procyanidins (PCs) from cocoa beans, PC extract was fractionated by several methodologies, including solid phase extraction, Sephadex LH-20 gel permeation, and preparative HPLC using C18 and diol stationary phases. All the isolated fractions were analyzed by UHPLC-QTOF-MS to determine their relative composition. According to our results, classical techniques allowed good separation of alkaloids, catechins, dimers, and trimers, but were inefficient for oligomeric PCs. Preparative C18-HPLC method allowed the attainment of high relative composition of fractions enriched with alkaloids, catechins, and PCs with degree of polymerization (DP) < 4. However, the best results were obtained by preparative diol-HPLC, providing a separation according to the increasing DP. According to the mass spectrometry fragmentation pattern, the nine isolated fractions (Fractions II–X) consisted of exclusively individual PCs and their corresponding isomers (same DP). In summary, an efficient, robust, and fast method using a preparative diol column for the isolation of PCs is proposed. Regarding DPPH and ABTS•+ scavenging activity, it increases according to the DP; therefore, the highest activity was for cocoa extract > PCs > monomers. Thereby, cocoa procyanidins might be of interest to be used as alternative antioxidants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Based Chemistry – towards “Green Chemistry 2.0”)
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Article
Influence of Terpene Type on the Release from an O/W Nanoemulsion: Experimental and Theoretical Studies
Molecules 2020, 25(12), 2747; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25122747 - 13 Jun 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 735
Abstract
The interaction between a drug molecule and its carrier’s components is an important factor which influences the drug release profile. For this purpose, molecular dynamics (MD) may be the in silico tool which can help to understand the mechanism of drug loading/release. The [...] Read more.
The interaction between a drug molecule and its carrier’s components is an important factor which influences the drug release profile. For this purpose, molecular dynamics (MD) may be the in silico tool which can help to understand the mechanism of drug loading/release. The aim of this work is to explain the effect of interactions between different types of terpenes, namely perillyl alcohol, forskolin, ursolic acid, and the nanoemulsion droplet core, on the release by means of experimental and theoretical studies. The basic nanoemulsion was composed of caprylic/capric triglyceride as the oil phase, polysorbate 80 as the emulsifier, and water. The in vitro release tests from a terpene-loaded nanoemulsion were carried out to determine the release profiles. The behavior of terpenoids in the nanoemulsion was also theoretically investigated using the molecular dynamics method. The forskolin-loaded nanoemulsion showed the highest percentage of drug release (almost 80% w/w) in contrast to ursolic acid and perillyl alcohol-loaded nanoemulsions (about 53% w/w and 19% w/w, respectively). The results confirmed that the kinetic model of release was terpene-type dependent. The zero-order model was the best to describe the ursolic acid release profile, while the forskolin and the perillyl alcohol followed a first-order and Higuchi model, respectively. Molecular dynamics simulations, especially energetical analysis, confirmed that the driving force of terpenes diffusion from nanoemulsion interior was their interaction energy with a surfactant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Based Chemistry – towards “Green Chemistry 2.0”)
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Article
Oxone®-Mediated TEMPO-Oxidized Cellulose Nanomaterials form I and form II
Molecules 2020, 25(8), 1847; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25081847 - 17 Apr 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 921
Abstract
The 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl (TEMPO) oxidation of cellulose, when mediated with Oxone® (KHSO5), can be performed simply and under mild conditions. Furthermore, the products of the reaction can be isolated into two major components: Oxone®-mediated TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanomaterials Form I [...] Read more.
The 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl (TEMPO) oxidation of cellulose, when mediated with Oxone® (KHSO5), can be performed simply and under mild conditions. Furthermore, the products of the reaction can be isolated into two major components: Oxone®-mediated TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanomaterials Form I and Form II (OTO-CNM Form I and Form II). This study focuses on the characterization of the properties of OTO-CNMs. Nanoparticle-sized cellulose fibers of 5 and 16 nm, respectively, were confirmed through electron microscopy. Infrared spectroscopy showed that the most carboxylation presented in Form II. Conductometric titration showed a two-fold increase in carboxylation from Form I (800 mmol/kg) to Form II (1600 mmol/kg). OTO-CNMs showed cellulose crystallinity in the range of 64–68% and crystallite sizes of 1.4–3.3 nm, as shown through XRD. OTO-CNMs show controlled variability in hydrophilicity with contact angles ranging from 16 to 32°, within or below the 26–47° reported in the literature for TEMPO-oxidized CNMs. Newly discovered OTO-CNM Form II shows enhanced hydrophilic properties as well as unique crystallinity and chemical functionalization in the field of bio-sourced material and nanocomposites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Based Chemistry – towards “Green Chemistry 2.0”)
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