E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Perovskite Solar Cells"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Photochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Pablo Docampo

Department of Chemistry, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München 81377, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: hybrid photovoltaic systems; growth of hybrid metal halide perovskite materials for both solar cell and lighting applications; understanding of the fundamental properties of metal halide perovskite materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hybrid halide perovskite materials have gained a lot of traction in the field of photovoltaics due to their simple processability, high material quality, and extremely high performance, with power conversion efficiencies over 20% already demonstrated, approaching that of state-of-the-art materials. While the biggest advances to performance thus far have arisen from optimization of the perovskite deposition techniques, understanding the role of interfaces in the device is crucial to maximize the performance of the system. This Special Issue will provide a forum to disseminate new developments, generally on perovskite solar cell interfaces, including their properties and their modification, such as passivating or protective layers, as well as the development of new hole and electron transporters.

Dr. Pablo Docampo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • perovskite surface
  • interface modification
  • passivation layer
  • protective layer
  • moisture barrier
  • hole transporter
  • electron transporter
  • additives
  • contacts
  • extraction layer

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Emission Enhancement and Intermittency in Polycrystalline Organolead Halide Perovskite Films
Molecules 2016, 21(8), 1081; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules21081081
Received: 15 June 2016 / Revised: 1 August 2016 / Accepted: 9 August 2016 / Published: 18 August 2016
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (3074 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Inorganic-organic halide organometal perovskites have demonstrated very promising performance for opto-electronic applications, such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, lasers, single-photon sources, etc. However, the little knowledge on the underlying photophysics, especially on a microscopic scale, hampers the further improvement of devices based on [...] Read more.
Inorganic-organic halide organometal perovskites have demonstrated very promising performance for opto-electronic applications, such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, lasers, single-photon sources, etc. However, the little knowledge on the underlying photophysics, especially on a microscopic scale, hampers the further improvement of devices based on this material. In this communication, correlated conventional photoluminescence (PL) characterization and wide-field PL imaging as a function of time are employed to investigate the spatially- and temporally-resolved PL in CH3NH3PbI3−xClx perovskite films. Along with a continuous increase of the PL intensity during light soaking, we also observe PL blinking or PL intermittency behavior in individual grains of these films. Combined with significant suppression of PL blinking in perovskite films coated with a phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) layer, it suggests that this PL intermittency is attributed to Auger recombination induced by photoionized defects/traps or mobile ions within grains. These defects/traps are detrimental for light conversion and can be effectively passivated by the PCBM layer. This finding paves the way to provide a guideline on the further improvement of perovskite opto-electronic devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perovskite Solar Cells)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Highly Efficient Reproducible Perovskite Solar Cells Prepared by Low-Temperature Processing
Molecules 2016, 21(4), 542; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules21040542
Received: 4 April 2016 / Revised: 19 April 2016 / Accepted: 21 April 2016 / Published: 23 April 2016
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (2036 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In this work, we describe the role of the different layers in perovskite solar cells to achieve reproducible, ~16% efficient perovskite solar cells. We used a planar device architecture with PEDOT:PSS on the bottom, followed by the perovskite layer and an evaporated C [...] Read more.
In this work, we describe the role of the different layers in perovskite solar cells to achieve reproducible, ~16% efficient perovskite solar cells. We used a planar device architecture with PEDOT:PSS on the bottom, followed by the perovskite layer and an evaporated C60 layer before deposition of the top electrode. No high temperature annealing step is needed, which also allows processing on flexible plastic substrates. Only the optimization of all of these layers leads to highly efficient and reproducible results. In this work, we describe the effects of different processing conditions, especially the influence of the C60 top layer on the device performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perovskite Solar Cells)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Recent Advances in Interface Engineering for Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells
Molecules 2016, 21(7), 837; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules21070837
Received: 22 May 2016 / Revised: 19 June 2016 / Accepted: 22 June 2016 / Published: 25 June 2016
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (5318 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells are considered as one of the most promising next-generation solar cells due to their advantages of low-cost precursors, high power conversion efficiency (PCE) and easy of processing. In the past few years, the PCEs have climbed from a [...] Read more.
Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells are considered as one of the most promising next-generation solar cells due to their advantages of low-cost precursors, high power conversion efficiency (PCE) and easy of processing. In the past few years, the PCEs have climbed from a few to over 20% for perovskite solar cells. Recent developments demonstrate that perovskite exhibits ambipolar semiconducting characteristics, which allows for the construction of planar heterojunction (PHJ) perovskite solar cells. PHJ perovskite solar cells can avoid the use of high-temperature sintered mesoporous metal oxides, enabling simple processing and the fabrication of flexible and tandem perovskite solar cells. In planar heterojunction materials, hole/electron transport layers are introduced between a perovskite film and the anode/cathode. The hole and electron transporting layers are expected to enhance exciton separation, charge transportation and collection. Further, the supporting layer for the perovskite film not only plays an important role in energy-level alignment, but also affects perovskite film morphology, which have a great effect on device performance. In addition, interfacial layers also affect device stability. In this review, recent progress in interfacial engineering for PHJ perovskite solar cells will be reviewed, especially with the molecular interfacial materials. The supporting interfacial layers for the optimization of perovskite films will be systematically reviewed. Finally, the challenges remaining in perovskite solar cells research will be discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perovskite Solar Cells)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview Neutral- and Multi-Colored Semitransparent Perovskite Solar Cells
Molecules 2016, 21(4), 475; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules21040475
Received: 18 March 2016 / Revised: 1 April 2016 / Accepted: 5 April 2016 / Published: 11 April 2016
Cited by 23 | PDF Full-text (4448 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this review, we summarize recent works on perovskite solar cells with neutral- and multi-colored semitransparency for building-integrated photovoltaics and tandem solar cells. The perovskite solar cells exploiting microstructured arrays of perovskite “islands” and transparent electrodes—the latter of which include thin metallic films, [...] Read more.
In this review, we summarize recent works on perovskite solar cells with neutral- and multi-colored semitransparency for building-integrated photovoltaics and tandem solar cells. The perovskite solar cells exploiting microstructured arrays of perovskite “islands” and transparent electrodes—the latter of which include thin metallic films, metal nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphenes, and transparent conductive oxides for achieving optical transparency—are investigated. Moreover, the perovskite solar cells with distinctive color generation, which are enabled by engineering the band gap of the perovskite light-harvesting semiconductors with chemical management and integrating with photonic nanostructures, including microcavity, are discussed. We conclude by providing future research directions toward further performance improvements of the semitransparent perovskite solar cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Perovskite Solar Cells)
Figures

Figure 1

Molecules EISSN 1420-3049 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top