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Special Issue "Molecules in Engineering"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Fawad Inam
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of East London, Department of Engineering and Computing, London, UK
Interests: design engineering smart materials; nanotechnology; nanocomposites; materials and manufacturing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A significant rise in the number of innovative applications and devices utilizing advanced molecular level engineering is currently the major focus of intensive research. Molecular engineering is an interdisciplinary discipline, encompassing various aspects of materials science and engineering, chemical engineering, bioengineering, electrical and electronics engineering, mechanical engineering and basic sciences (chemistry, biology and physics). Novel molecules (e.g., graphene) and/or their cleverly strategized combinations (i.e., hybridisation or composite processing) are subjects of wide and impactful research for their utilization in a number of applications like petrochemical, energy, construction, biomedical, transportation, aerospace, defence, telecommunication, sporting goods and infrastructure development.

This Special Issue will focus on the preparation, processing, development and application of novel molecules, molecular arrangements and/or their combinations (i.e., composite science and technology). This open-access Issue intends to cover the radical step-change in the capabilities and application of molecules in an engineering context with a clear focus on materials science and related applied sciences. Original articles and reviews are welcome. However, research articles, which include practical experimental results and critical theory, are particularly encouraged, as are papers, which set advanced molecular engineering in the wider context of, for example, society, economics, energy and environment.

Prof. Dr. Fawad Inam
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Molecular engineering
  • Molecular interactions
  • Composites
  • Mechanical properties
  • Smart materials and devices
  • Functional materials
  • Electrical properties
  • Engineering applications
  • Biomedical applications
  • Synthetic biology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Customizable Ceramic Nanocomposites Using Carbon Nanotubes
Molecules 2019, 24(17), 3176; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24173176 - 01 Sep 2019
Abstract
A novel tweakable nanocomposite was prepared by spark plasma sintering followed by systematic oxidation of carbon nanotube (CNT) molecules to produce alumina/carbon nanotube nanocomposites with surface porosities. The mechanical properties (flexural strength and fracture toughness), surface area, and electrical conductivities were characterized and [...] Read more.
A novel tweakable nanocomposite was prepared by spark plasma sintering followed by systematic oxidation of carbon nanotube (CNT) molecules to produce alumina/carbon nanotube nanocomposites with surface porosities. The mechanical properties (flexural strength and fracture toughness), surface area, and electrical conductivities were characterized and compared. The nanocomposites were extensively analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) for 2D qualitative surface morphological analysis. Adding CNTs in ceramic matrices and then systematically oxidizing them, without substantial reduction in densification, induces significant capability to achieve desirable/application oriented balance between mechanical, electrical, and catalytic properties of these ceramic nanocomposites. This novel strategy, upon further development, opens new level of opportunities for real-world/industrial applications of these relatively novel engineering materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecules in Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Daylight Bactericidal Titania Textiles: A Contribution to Nosocomial Infections Control
Molecules 2019, 24(10), 1891; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24101891 - 16 May 2019
Abstract
Daylight bactericidal cotton (100% cotton) textiles are presented and proposed for future hospital use. Amorphous titania (a-TiO2) and amorphous titania/chitosan complexes (a-TiO2//CS) were the selected bactericidal agents. Nanoparticles (NPs) and films were the two paths designed. Cotton textiles were [...] Read more.
Daylight bactericidal cotton (100% cotton) textiles are presented and proposed for future hospital use. Amorphous titania (a-TiO2) and amorphous titania/chitosan complexes (a-TiO2//CS) were the selected bactericidal agents. Nanoparticles (NPs) and films were the two paths designed. Cotton textiles were impregnated with a-TiO2-based NPs or coated with a-TiO2 films. Industrial impregnation/coating will be implemented during the textile finishing treatments. A novel (room temperature and base-catalyzed), green (hydrothermal water as a catalyst), time-saving, and easy scale-up sol–gel process was established to produce the a-TiO2-based NPs. Amorphous-TiO2 films were produced by a dip-in (acid catalyzed) sol–gel solution. The daylight bactericidal performance (without the need of an external ultraviolet light source) of a-TiO2 NPs, films, and impregnated/coated textiles was proven according to AATCC 100 and ASTM E2149, using Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC®6538TM) as the bacterial indicator strain. A bacterial reduction of 99.97% was achieved for the a-TiO2 films and of 99.97% for the a-TiO2//CS NPs. Regarding the impregnated textiles, a bacterial reduction of 91.66% was achieved with a-TiO2//CS NPs, and 99.97% for cotton textiles coated with an a-TiO2 film. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecules in Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Steady Enhancement in Photovoltaic Properties of Fluorine Functionalized Quinoxaline-Based Narrow Bandgap Polymer
Molecules 2019, 24(1), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24010054 - 24 Dec 2018
Abstract
To investigate the influence of fluoride phenyl side-chains onto a quinoxaline (Qx) unit on the photovoltaic performance of the narrow bandgap (NBG) photovoltaic polymers, herein, two novel NBG copolymers, PBDTT-DTQx and PBDTT-DTmFQx, were synthesized and characterized. 2-ethylhexylthiothiophene-substituted benzodithiophene (BDTT), 2,3-diphenylquinoxaline (DQx) [or [...] Read more.
To investigate the influence of fluoride phenyl side-chains onto a quinoxaline (Qx) unit on the photovoltaic performance of the narrow bandgap (NBG) photovoltaic polymers, herein, two novel NBG copolymers, PBDTT-DTQx and PBDTT-DTmFQx, were synthesized and characterized. 2-ethylhexylthiothiophene-substituted benzodithiophene (BDTT), 2,3-diphenylquinoxaline (DQx) [or 2,3-bis(3-fluorophenyl)quinoxaline (DmFQx)] and 2-ethylhexylthiophene (T) were used as the electron donor (D) unit, electron-withdrawing acceptor (A) unit and π-bridge, respectively. Compared to non-fluorine substituted PBDTT-DTQx, fluoride PBDTT-DTmFQx exhibited a wide UV-Vis absorption spectrum and high hole mobility. An enhanced short-circuit current (Jsc) and fill factor (FF) simultaneously gave rise to favorable efficiencies in the polymer/PC71BM-based polymer solar cells (PSCs). Under the illumination of AM 1.5G (100 mW cm−2), a maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.40% was achieved with an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.87 V, a Jsc of 12.0 mA cm−2 and a FF of 61.45% in PBDTT-DTmFQx/PC71BM-based PSCs, while PBDTT-DTQx-based devices also exhibited a PCE of 5.43%. The excellent results obtained demonstrate that PBDTT-DTmFQx by fluorine atom engineering could be a promising candidate for organic photovoltaics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecules in Engineering)
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