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Special Issue "From Green to Democratic Analytical Chemistry"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Green Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Miguel de la Guardia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universitat de Valencia, Department of Analytical Chemistry
Interests: green analytical chemistry; sample preparation; chromatography; spectroscopy; mineral composition; food analysis; environmental analysis; clinical and forensic analysis; drug analysis
Prof. Salvador Garrigues
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain
Interests: green analytical chemistry; sample preparation; chromatography; vibrational spectroscopy; food analysis; environmental analysis; clinical and forensic analysi; drug analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will cover concepts and data on the new paradigm of democratic analytical chemistry. This is based on the advancements in green analytical chemistry that make the benefits of analytical methods accessible to the whole population, by using low-cost and easily available instrumentation and freely available software.
The main advantages and challenges of the new situation will be highlighted in order to enhance their tremendous possibilities and to reduce the risks of fake data distribution or false data interpretation.

Prof. Dr. Miguel de la Guardia
Prof. Salvador Garrigues
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access Biannual journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Green analytical chemistry;
  • Remote sensing;
  • Smartphone image analysis;
  • Free accessible software;
  • Low-cost instrumentation;
  • Point-of-care determinations.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Optimizing Water-Based Extraction of Bioactive Principles of Hawthorn: From Experimental Laboratory Research to Homemade Preparations
Molecules 2019, 24(23), 4420; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24234420 - 03 Dec 2019
Abstract
Hawthorn (Crataegus) is used for its cardiotonic, hypotensive, vasodilative, sedative, antiatherosclerotic, and antihyperlipidemic properties. One of the main goals of this work was to find a well-defined optimized extraction protocol usable by each of us that would lead to repeatable, controlled, and quantified [...] Read more.
Hawthorn (Crataegus) is used for its cardiotonic, hypotensive, vasodilative, sedative, antiatherosclerotic, and antihyperlipidemic properties. One of the main goals of this work was to find a well-defined optimized extraction protocol usable by each of us that would lead to repeatable, controlled, and quantified daily uptake of active components from hawthorn at a drinkable temperature (below 60 °C). A thorough investigation of the extraction mode in water (infusion, maceration, percolation, ultrasounds, microwaves) on the yield of extraction and the amount of phenolic compounds, flavonoids, and proanthocyanidin oligomers as well as on the Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography (UHPLC) profiles of the extracted compounds was carried out. High-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was also implemented to discriminate the different samples and conditions of extraction. The quantitative and qualitative aspects of the extraction as well as the kinetics of extraction were studied, not only according to the part (flowers or leaves), the state (fresh or dried), and the granulometry of the dry plant, but also the stirring speed, the temperature, the extraction time, the volume of the container (cup, mug or bowl) and the use of infusion bags. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Green to Democratic Analytical Chemistry)
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Open AccessArticle
Spectrophotometric and Smartphone-Assisted Determination of Phenolic Compounds Using Crude Eggplant Extract
Molecules 2019, 24(23), 4407; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24234407 - 02 Dec 2019
Abstract
In order to develop a simple, reliable and low cost enzymatic method for the determination of phenolic compounds we studied polyphenol oxidase activity of crude eggplant (S. melongena) extract using 13 phenolic compounds. Catechol, caffeic and chlorogenic acids, and L-DOPA have [...] Read more.
In order to develop a simple, reliable and low cost enzymatic method for the determination of phenolic compounds we studied polyphenol oxidase activity of crude eggplant (S. melongena) extract using 13 phenolic compounds. Catechol, caffeic and chlorogenic acids, and L-DOPA have been rapidly oxidized with the formation of colored products. Monophenolic compounds have been oxidized at a much slower speed. Ferulic acid, quercetin, rutin, and dihydroquercetin have been found to inhibit polyphenol oxidase activity of crude eggplant extract. The influence of pH, temperature, crude eggplant extract amount, and 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone (MBTH) concentration on the oxidation of catechol, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, and L-DOPA has been investigated spectrophotometrically. Michaelis constants values decrease by a factor of 2 to 3 in the presence of MBTH. Spectrophotometric (cuvette and microplate variants) and smartphone-assisted procedures for phenolic compounds determination have been proposed. Average saturation values (HSV color model) of the images of the microplate wells have been chosen as the analytical signal for smartphone-assisted procedure. LOD values for catechol, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, and L-DOPA equaled 5.1, 6.3, 5.8 and 30.0 µM (cuvette procedure), 12.2, 13.2, 13.2 and 80.4 µM (microplate procedure), and 23.5, 26.4, 20.8 and 120.6 µM (smartphone procedure). All the variants have been successfully applied for fast (4-5 min) and simple TPC determination in plant derived products and L-DOPA determination in model biological fluids. The values found with smartphone procedure are in good agreement with both spectrophotometric procedures values and reference values. Using crude eggplant extract- mediated reactions combined with smartphone camera detection has allowed creating low-cost, reliable and environmentally friendly analytical method for the determination of phenolic compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Green to Democratic Analytical Chemistry)
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Open AccessArticle
β-Cyclodextrin Assisted Liquid–Liquid Microextraction Based on Solidification of the Floating Organic Droplets Method for Determination of Neonicotinoid Residues
Molecules 2019, 24(21), 3954; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24213954 - 31 Oct 2019
Abstract
An efficient and environment-friendly microextraction method, namely, β-cyclodextrin assisted liquid–liquid microextraction, based on solidification of the floating organic droplets method coupled with HPLC is investigated for the sensitive determination of trace neonicotinoid pesticide residues. In this method, β-cyclodextrin is used as a disperser [...] Read more.
An efficient and environment-friendly microextraction method, namely, β-cyclodextrin assisted liquid–liquid microextraction, based on solidification of the floating organic droplets method coupled with HPLC is investigated for the sensitive determination of trace neonicotinoid pesticide residues. In this method, β-cyclodextrin is used as a disperser solvent, while 1-octanol is selected as an extraction solvent. β-cyclodextrins was found to decrease interfacial tension and increase the contact area between the organic and water phases with the help of centrifugation. A cloudy solution was rapidly formed and then centrifuged to complete phase separation. Various key parameters influencing extraction efficiency were systematically investigated and optimized; they include salt addition, concentration of β-cyclodextrin, and volume of extraction solvent (1-octanol). Under optimum conditions, good linearity was obtained with coefficient for determination (R2) greater than 0.99. A low limit of detection, high enrichment factor, and good recovery (83 – 132) were achieved. This proves that the proposed method can be applied to determine trace neonicotinoid pesticide residues in natural surface water samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Green to Democratic Analytical Chemistry)
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