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Special Issue "Recent Advances of Nanoparticles in Biomedical Applications"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022 | Viewed by 3797

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Akiyoshi Taniguchi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Center for Functional Materials, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
Interests: study of interaction between nanomaterials and cells
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Yen Nee Tan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Science, Agriculture and Engineering (SAgE), Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK
Interests: bioinspired nanomaterials; biofunctionalized metal nanoparticles (noble metal, semiconductor, magnetic); fluorescent nanodots (metal nanoclusters, AIE luminogen, carbon dot); biosensors and bioimaging; theranostics; nanomedicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Pranjal Chandra
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Biochemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (BHU) Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India
Interests: biosensors; nanobioengineering; material engineering; bioanalytical systems; biomedical diagnostics; microfluidics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanotechnology deals with nanoparticles which are very small in diameter, ranging from 0.1 to 100 nm. Nanoparticles have their unique properties including morphology, compositions, size, and surface chemistry which induce different behavior than those of micro- and macro-scale particles. There are many types of nanoparticles depending on their properties, such as metallic nanoparticles, carbon-based, ceramics, semiconductor, polymeric, and lipid-based nanoparticles. Nanoparticles are used in a wide range of applications, such as biomedical, pharmaceutics, and drug delivery systems due to their optical, thermal, electrical, mechanical, and catalytic properties. For this Special Issue, we invite original research or review papers that focus on nanoparticles in biomedical applications, such as DDS or bioimaging using nanoparticles.

Prof. Dr. Akiyoshi Taniguchi
Prof. Dr. Yen Nee Tan
Prof. Dr. Pranjal Chandra
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanoparticles
  • DDS
  • Bioimaging
  • Biosensors/medical diagnostic
  • Interaction between nanoparticles and cells
  • Nanobiomaterials
  • Bioinspired nanomaterials
  • Nanomedicine
  • Theranostic nanomaterials
  • Microfluidics 
  • Bioanalytical Systems
  • Nanobioengineering
  • Biofunctionalization

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
pH-Responsive PEGylated Niosomal Nanoparticles as an Active-Targeting Cyclophosphamide Delivery System for Gastric Cancer Therapy
Molecules 2022, 27(17), 5418; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27175418 - 24 Aug 2022
Viewed by 732
Abstract
A PEGylated niosomal formulation of cyclophosphamide (Nio-Cyclo-PEG) was prepared using a central composite design and characterized in terms of drug loading, size distribution, and average size. The stability of formulations was also studied at different conditions. In vitro cytotoxicity of drug delivery formulations [...] Read more.
A PEGylated niosomal formulation of cyclophosphamide (Nio-Cyclo-PEG) was prepared using a central composite design and characterized in terms of drug loading, size distribution, and average size. The stability of formulations was also studied at different conditions. In vitro cytotoxicity of drug delivery formulations was assessed on gastric cancer cells using MTT assay. The mechanism of cytotoxicity was studied at the transcriptional level by real-time PCR on Caspase3, Caspase9, CyclinD, CyclinE, MMP-2, and MMP-9 genes, while apoptosis was investigated with flow cytometry. The anti-metastatic property was evaluated using the scratch method. Propidium iodide staining was used to study the cell cycle. The results indicated that the as-designed nanocarrier exhibited a controlled drug release pattern with improved nanoparticle stability. It was found that the living cancer cells treated with Nio-Cyclo-PEG showed a significant decrease in number when compared with the niosomal carrier without PEG (Nio-Cyclo) and free drug (Cyclo). Moreover, the drug-loaded nanocarrier induced planned death (apoptosis) in the cancer cells through the regulation of Caspase3, Caspase9, CyclinD, CyclinE, MMP-9, and MMP-2 gene expression, indicating that the Nio-Cyclo-PEG formulation could significantly inhibit the cell cycle at the sub G1 phase as well as prevent the migration of cancer cells. In conclusion, Nio-Cyclo-PEG as developed in this study could serve as an active-targeting drug delivery nanocarriers for gastric cancer therapy with high efficacy and minimal side effects on healthy tissues/cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances of Nanoparticles in Biomedical Applications)
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Article
SiO2 Fibers of Two Lengths and Their Effect on Cellular Responses of Macrophage-like Cells
Molecules 2022, 27(14), 4456; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27144456 - 12 Jul 2022
Viewed by 587
Abstract
The immunoreactivity or/and stress response can be induced by nanomaterials’ different properties, such as size, shape, etc. These effects are, however, not yet fully understood. This study aimed to clarify the effects of SiO2 nanofibers (SiO2NFs) on the cellular responses [...] Read more.
The immunoreactivity or/and stress response can be induced by nanomaterials’ different properties, such as size, shape, etc. These effects are, however, not yet fully understood. This study aimed to clarify the effects of SiO2 nanofibers (SiO2NFs) on the cellular responses of THP-1-derived macrophage-like cells. The effects of SiO2NFs with different lengths on reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β in THP-1 cells were evaluated. From the two tested lengths, it was only the L-SiO2NFs with a length ≈ 44 ± 22 µm that could induce ROS. Compared to this, only S-SiO2NFs with a length ≈ 14 ± 17 µm could enhance TNF-α and IL-1β expression. Our results suggested that L-SiO2NFs disassembled by THP-1 cells produced ROS and that the inflammatory reaction was induced by the uptake of S-SiO2NFs by THP-1 cells. The F-actin staining results indicated that SiO2NFs induced cell motility and phagocytosis. There was no difference in cytotoxicity between L- and S-SiO2NFs. However, our results suggested that the lengths of SiO2NFs induced different cellular responses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances of Nanoparticles in Biomedical Applications)
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Article
EGF Conjugation Improves Safety and Uptake Efficacy of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles
Molecules 2020, 25(19), 4467; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25194467 - 29 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1537
Abstract
Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have a strong potential for cancer therapeutic and bioimaging applications such as photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photodynamic diagnosis (PDD). Our previous results have shown that TiO2 NPs have a low cellular uptake and can induce cell [...] Read more.
Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have a strong potential for cancer therapeutic and bioimaging applications such as photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photodynamic diagnosis (PDD). Our previous results have shown that TiO2 NPs have a low cellular uptake and can induce cell proliferation. This suggests that TiO2 NPs could increase the risk of tumor overgrowth while being used for PDD and PDT. To solve this problem, we constructed epidermal growth factor-ligated polyethylene glycol-coated TiO2 NPs (EGF-TiO2 PEG NPs). In this work, we studied the effect of EGF conjugation on the cellular uptake of TiO2 PEG NPs. Then, we investigated the effect of both non-conjugated and EGF-TiO2 PEG NPs on the A431 epidermal cancer cell line, proliferation and growth via the investigation of EGFR localization and expression. Our results indicated that TiO2 PEG NPs induced EGFRs aggregation on the A431 cells surface and induced cell proliferation. In addition, EGF-TiO2 PEG NPs induced the internalization of EGFRs inside of cells with increased cellular NPs uptake and decreased cellular proliferation compared to TiO2 PEG NPs-treated cells. These findings suggest that EGF conjugation can increase the efficacy of TiO2 PEG NPs for biomedical applications such as PDD and PDT with decreased risk of tumor overgrowth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances of Nanoparticles in Biomedical Applications)
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