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Special Issue "Efficient Technology for the Pretreatment of Biomass III"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Green Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ivet Ferrer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: biodegradable waste; microalgae, sewage sludge, biogas; anaerobic digestion; co-digestion; biomass pretreatment; life cycle assessment (LCA); low-tech digesters
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Georgia Antonopoulou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (ICE-HT/FORTH), Patra, Greece
Interests: biofuels production via microbial processes (anaerobic digestion, fermentative hydrogen production, and bioethanol production); microbial fuel cells. pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass; modeling of microbial processes
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Leonidas Matsakas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Luleå University of Technology, C148 Luleå, Sweden
Interests: biomass pretreatment and fractionation; organosolv; bioenergy; biofuels; biomaterials; heterotrophic growth of algae; production of nutraceutical compounds; lignin valorization; enzymatic processes
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Nuriye Altınay Perendeci
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Akdeniz University,Engineering Faculty, Environmental Engineering Department, Antalya-Turkey
Interests: biofuel (bioethanol) and bioenergy (biogas) production from wastewater, solid wastes, energy crops, and microalgae; physicochemical pretreatment processes of lignocellulosic biomass; process optimization of pretreatment processes; modeling of anaerobic digestion

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Βiomass represents one of the most abundant biological resources, including agricultural and forestry residues, herbaceous and woody crops, manure, sewage sludge, the biodegradable fraction of municipal solid waste, animal by-products, and algae (third-generation biomass). Although it is the most promising feedstock for biofuels or biomaterials generation, considering its availability and low/zero cost, its complex structure restricts its transformation, accompanied by low conversion yields and productivities. In order to overcome the structural and compositional barriers for converting biomass into bio-products, an efficient fractionation via pretreatment is considered as a prerequisite.
Several pretreatment methods such as mechanical, physicochemical, thermal, and biological have been developed to improve the biomass transformation process efficiencies, rates, and yields. However, their high-cost and specific energy requirements are often significant barriers for the total process economy, remaining the main challenge for scaling-up the whole process. Thus, the development of an efficient, low-cost, and environmentally friendly pretreatment approach is still quite appealing.
This Special Issue will present new trends and recent developments in biomass pretreatment technologies towards bioproducts or biofuels production. Papers describing new insights into pretreatment mechanisms; the development of new, efficient pretreatment processes; environmental, energy or economic assessments, and modeling of pretreatment processes are particularly welcome. Review articles are also welcome.

Dr. Ivet Ferrer
Dr. Georgia Antonopoulou
Dr. Leonidas Matsakas
Dr. Nuriye Altınay Perendeci
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • New pretreatment technologies
  • Pretreatment mechanisms
  • Biomass fractionation for biorefinery
  • Pretreatment modeling
  • Environmental assessment
  • Energy assessment
  • Economic assessment
  • Life cycle assessment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Pretreatment, Anaerobic Codigestion, or Both? Which Is More Suitable for the Enhancement of Methane Production from Agricultural Waste?
Molecules 2021, 26(14), 4175; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26144175 - 09 Jul 2021
Viewed by 374
Abstract
Pretreatment and codigestion are proven to be effective strategies for the enhancement of the anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic residues. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of pretreatment and codigestion on methane production and the hydrolysis rate in the anaerobic [...] Read more.
Pretreatment and codigestion are proven to be effective strategies for the enhancement of the anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic residues. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of pretreatment and codigestion on methane production and the hydrolysis rate in the anaerobic digestion of agricultural wastes (AWs). Thermal and different thermochemical pretreatments were applied on AWs. Sewage sludge (SS) was selected as a cosubstrate. Biochemical methane potential tests were performed by mixing SS with raw and pretreated AWs at different mixing ratios. Hydrolysis rates were estimated by the best fit obtained with the first-order kinetic model. As a result of the experimental and kinetic studies, the best strategy was determined to be thermochemical pretreatment with sodium hydroxide (NaOH). This strategy resulted in a maximum enhancement in the anaerobic digestion of AWs, a 56% increase in methane production, an 81.90% increase in the hydrolysis rate and a 79.63% decrease in the technical digestion time compared to raw AWs. On the other hand, anaerobic codigestion (AcoD) with SS was determined to be ineffective when it came to the enhancement of methane production and the hydrolysis rate. The most suitable mixing ratio was determined to be 80:20 (Aws/SS) for the AcoD of the studied AWs with SS in order to obtain the highest possible methane production without any antagonistic effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Efficient Technology for the Pretreatment of Biomass III)
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Article
Comparative Study of Different Operation Modes of Microbial Fuel Cells Treating Food Residue Biomass
Molecules 2021, 26(13), 3987; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26133987 - 29 Jun 2021
Viewed by 467
Abstract
Four multiple air–cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were developed under the scope of using extracts from fermentable household food waste (FORBI) for the production of bioelectricity. The operation of the MFCs was assessed in batch mode, considering each cell individually. Τhe chemical oxygen [...] Read more.
Four multiple air–cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were developed under the scope of using extracts from fermentable household food waste (FORBI) for the production of bioelectricity. The operation of the MFCs was assessed in batch mode, considering each cell individually. Τhe chemical oxygen demand (COD) efficiency was relatively high in all cases (>85% for all batch cycles) while the electricity yield was 20 mJ/gCOD/L of extract solution. The four units were then electrically connected as a stack, both in series and in parallel, and were operated continuously. Approximately 62% COD consumption was obtained in continuous stack operation operated in series and 67% when operated in parallel. The electricity yield of the stack was 2.6 mJ/gCOD/L of extract solution when operated continuously in series and 0.7 mJ/gCOD/L when operated continuously in parallel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Efficient Technology for the Pretreatment of Biomass III)
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Article
Sugar Production from Hybrid Poplar Sawdust: Optimization of Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Wet Explosion Pretreatment
Molecules 2020, 25(15), 3396; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25153396 - 27 Jul 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 645
Abstract
Wet explosion pretreatment of hybrid poplar sawdust (PSD) for the production of fermentable sugar was carried out in the pilot-scale. The effects of pretreatment conditions, such as temperature (170–190 °C), oxygen dosage (0.5–7.5% of dry matter (DM), w/w), residence time [...] Read more.
Wet explosion pretreatment of hybrid poplar sawdust (PSD) for the production of fermentable sugar was carried out in the pilot-scale. The effects of pretreatment conditions, such as temperature (170–190 °C), oxygen dosage (0.5–7.5% of dry matter (DM), w/w), residence time (10–30 min), on cellulose and hemicellulose digestibility after enzymatic hydrolysis were ascertained with a central composite design of the experiment. Further, enzymatic hydrolysis was optimized in terms of temperature, pH, and a mixture of CTec2 and HTec2 enzymes (Novozymes). Predictive modeling showed that cellulose and hemicellulose digestibility of 75.1% and 83.1%, respectively, could be achieved with a pretreatment at 177 °C with 7.5% O2 and a retention time of 30 min. An increased cellulose digestibility of 87.1% ± 0.1 could be achieved by pretreating at 190 °C; however, the hemicellulose yield would be significantly reduced. It was evident that more severe conditions were required for maximal cellulose digestibility than that of hemicellulose digestibility and that an optimal sugar yield demanded a set of conditions, which overall resulted in the maximum sugar yield. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Efficient Technology for the Pretreatment of Biomass III)
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Article
Designing Efficient Processes for Sustainable Bioethanol and Bio-Hydrogen Production from Grass Lawn Waste
Molecules 2020, 25(12), 2889; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25122889 - 23 Jun 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 725
Abstract
The effect of thermal, acid and alkali pretreatment methods on biological hydrogen (BHP) and bioethanol production (BP) from grass lawn (GL) waste was investigated, under different process schemes. BHP from the whole pretreatment slurry of GL was performed through mixed microbial cultures in [...] Read more.
The effect of thermal, acid and alkali pretreatment methods on biological hydrogen (BHP) and bioethanol production (BP) from grass lawn (GL) waste was investigated, under different process schemes. BHP from the whole pretreatment slurry of GL was performed through mixed microbial cultures in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) mode, while BP was carried out through the C5yeast Pichia stipitis, in SSF mode. From these experiments, the best pretreatment conditions were determined and the efficiencies for each process were assessed and compared, when using either the whole pretreatment slurry or the separated fractions (solid and liquid), the separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) or SSF mode, and especially for BP, the use of other yeasts such as Pachysolen tannophilus or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The experimental results showed that pretreatment with 10 gH2SO4/100 g total solids (TS) was the optimum for both BHP and BP. Separation of solid and liquid pretreated fractions led to the highest BHP (270.1 mL H2/g TS, corresponding to 3.4 MJ/kg TS) and also BP (108.8 mg ethanol/g TS, corresponding to 2.9 MJ/kg TS) yields. The latter was achieved by using P. stipitis for the fermentation of the hydrolysate and S. serevisiae for the solid fraction fermentation, at SSF. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Efficient Technology for the Pretreatment of Biomass III)
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