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Special Issue "Recent Advances in Extraction, Phytochemical Analysis and Bioactivity of Nonfood Plants with Well Established Relationships with Humans"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Green Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Valtcho Jeliazkov
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Crop and Soil Science, 431A Crop Science Building, 3050 SW Campus Way, Oregon, State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, United States
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Filippo Maggi
Website
Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy, University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino, Italy
Interests: medicinal and aromatic plants; essential oils; green extraction; phytochemistry; bioactivity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Tessema Astatkie
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Department of Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Dalhousie University, Truro, NS, B2N 5E3, Canada
Interests: design and analysis of experiments; linear and nonlinear regression; other statistical methods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As we know, medicinal and aromatic plants are important mainly because they contain plant secondary metabolites (such as essential oils, alkaloids, glycosides, saponins, tannins, vitamins, and other bioactives). While plant secondary metabolites are produced by pathways derived from primary metabolites, they do not play a direct role in the growth and development of the plant cells but, rather, have roles associated with plant protection and defense mechanisms.

Medicinal and aromatic plants have been used by humankind for a long time. Every traditional medicine system (e.g., Ayurveda, Siddha medicine, Unani, ancient Iranian medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, traditional African medicine, and traditional Korean medicine) may include hundreds to thousands of medicinal plants used for various forms of herbal medicine or for the production of extracts and pure chemicals that are being used by modern medicine for treatment, or prevention of various diseases.

However, there are some medicinal and aromatic plant species that have established special relationships with humans; these plants and their products have been utilized by humankind for centuries or millennia and are still some of the most utilized species and sources for plant natural products in modern times. This Special Issue will focus on “Recent Advances in Extraction, Phytochemical Analysis, and Bioactivity of Non-Food Plants with Well-Established Relationships with Humans”. These include tobacco (Nicotiana sp), hops (Humulus lupulus), hemp (Cannabis sativa), coffee (Coffea arabica), cacao (Theobroma cacao), tea (Camellia sinensis), cinchona (Cinchona officinalis), and opium poppy (Papaver somniferum).

Dr. Valtcho Jeliazkov
Prof. Dr. Filippo Maggi
Prof. Dr. Tessema Astatkie
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Green chemistry
  • Innovative extraction
  • Dual utilization
  • Biopesticides

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Characterization of Odor-Active Compounds, Polyphenols, and Fatty Acids in Coffee Silverskin
Molecules 2020, 25(13), 2993; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25132993 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
For the first time the volatile fraction of coffee silverskin has been studied focusing on odor-active compounds detected by gas chromatography-olfactometry/flame ionization detector (GC-O/FID) system. Two approaches, namely headspace (HS) analysis by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) and odor-active compounds analysis by gas [...] Read more.
For the first time the volatile fraction of coffee silverskin has been studied focusing on odor-active compounds detected by gas chromatography-olfactometry/flame ionization detector (GC-O/FID) system. Two approaches, namely headspace (HS) analysis by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) and odor-active compounds analysis by gas chromatography-olfactometry/flame ionization detector (GC-O/FID), have been employed to fully characterize the aroma profile of this by-product. This work also provided an entire characterization of the bioactive compounds present in coffee silverskin, including alkaloids, chlorogenic acids, phenolic acids, flavonoids, and secoiridoids, by using different extraction procedures and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) system. Coffee silverskin was shown to be a good source of caffeine and chlorogenic acids but also of phenolic acids and flavonoids. In addition, the fatty acid composition of the coffee silverskin was established by GC-FID system. The results from this research could contribute to the development of innovative applications and reuses of coffee silverskin, an interesting resource with a high potential to be tapped by the food and nutraceutical sector, and possibly also in the cosmetics and perfumery. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
GC-MS Composition and Olfactory Profile of Concretes from the Flowers of Four Nicotiana Species
Molecules 2020, 25(11), 2617; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25112617 - 04 Jun 2020
Abstract
The genus Nicotiana (Solanaceae) includes over 70 species, with a long history of traditional use; many of them are nowadays used in bioengineering, biosynthesis, molecular biology, and other studies, while common tobacco, N. tabacum L., is one of the most economically important industrial [...] Read more.
The genus Nicotiana (Solanaceae) includes over 70 species, with a long history of traditional use; many of them are nowadays used in bioengineering, biosynthesis, molecular biology, and other studies, while common tobacco, N. tabacum L., is one of the most economically important industrial crops worldwide. Although Nicotiana species have been extensively investigated, relatively less research has focused on flowers, especially research related to obtaining aromatic products for cosmetic and perfumery use. On the other hand, there is evidence that Nicotiana flowers accumulate various secondary metabolites with a distinct aroma and biological activities, and the flowers represent a biomass available in sufficient quantities. Therefore, this study aimed to determinate the chemical composition (by GC-MS) and the olfactory profiles of a specific type of natural aromatic product (concrete), obtained from the flowers of four Nicotiana species, in a direct comparison between them. The yields of extracted concrete were sufficiently high, varying between the species, 1.4% (N. rustica L.), 2.5% (N. glutinosa L.), 1.6% (N. alata Link&Otto genotype with white flowers), 2.7% (N. alata genotype with pink flowers), 3.2% (N. tabacum, Oriental type), and 5.2% (N. tabacum, Virginia type). The major components of the obtained concretes belonged to different chemical classes: N. rustica and N. tabacum (OR), the hydrocarbons n-tetratriacontane (14.5%; 15.0%) and n-triacontane (12.1%; 13.3%), and 3-methyl-pentanoic acid (11.1%; 12.2%); N. glutinosa, the diterpenes sclareol (25.9%), 3-α-hydroxy-manool (16.3%), and 13-epimanool (14.9%); N. alata (WF), the phenylpropanoid terephthalic acid and di(2-ethylhexyl) ester (42.9%); N. alata (PF), the diterpene tributyl acetylcitrate (30.7%); and N. tabacum (FCV), the hydrocarbons n-hexacosane (12.9%) and n-pentacosane (12.9%). Each of the flower concretes revealed a characteristic odor profile. This is the first report about Nicotiana species as a source for obtaining flower concretes; these initial results about the concrete yield, olfactory profile, and chemical composition are a prerequisite for the possible processing of Nicotiana flowers into new aromatic products for use in perfumery and cosmetics. The study provides new data in favor of the potential of the four Nicotiana species as aromatic plants, as well as a possible alternative use of flowers, a valuable, but discarded, plant material in other applications. Full article
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