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Special Issue "Bioactive Compounds from Cyanobacteria"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Tatsufumi Okino
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Environmental Earth Science, HokkaidoUniversity, Sapporo, 060-0810, Japan
Interests: cyanobacteria; enzyme inhibitor; antifouling; peptide; halogenase; cyototoxin

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cyanobacteria from terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments are rich sources of bioactive compounds. The recent accumulation of genomic data of cyanobacteria has accelerated biosynthetic studies of their secondary metabolites. In addition, studies focusing on mechanisms of action have increased. Cytotoxins and enzyme inhibitors from cyanobacteria have been known for a long time and more detailed studies of these activities are increasing recently. The other type of activities including anti-protozoal and antifouling properties have been explored.

In this Special Issue, we will publish informative papers and reviews regarding all aspects of bioactive compounds from cyanobacteria. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, structure elucidation, total synthesis, biosynthesis, screening methods, mechanisms of action, analytical methods in relation to bioactive compounds from marine, freshwater, and terrestrial cyanobacteria.

Prof. Tatsufumi Okino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cyanobacteria
  • polyketide
  • peptide
  • NRPS
  • PKS
  • anti-cancer
  • inhibitor
  • biosynthesis
  • toxin

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Analytical Technique Optimization on the Detection of β-cyclocitral in Microcystis Species
Molecules 2020, 25(4), 832; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25040832 (registering DOI) - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
β-Cyclocitral, specifically produced by Microcystis, is one of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) derived from cyanobacteria and has a lytic activity. It is postulated that β-cyclocitral is a key compound for regulating the occurrence of cyanobacteria and related microorganisms in an aquatic [...] Read more.
β-Cyclocitral, specifically produced by Microcystis, is one of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) derived from cyanobacteria and has a lytic activity. It is postulated that β-cyclocitral is a key compound for regulating the occurrence of cyanobacteria and related microorganisms in an aquatic environment. β-Cyclocitral is sensitively detected when a high density of the cells is achieved from late summer to autumn. Moreover, it is expected to be involved in changes in the species composition of cyanobacteria in a lake. Although several analysis methods for β-cyclocitral have already been reported, β-cyclocitral could be detected using only solid phase micro-extraction (SPME), whereas it could not be found at all using the solvent extraction method in a previous study. In this study, we investigated why β-cyclocitral was detected using only SPME GC/MS. Particularly, three operations in SPME, i.e., extraction temperature, sample stirring rate, and the effect of salt, were examined for the production of β-cyclocitral. Among these, heating (60 °C) was critical for the β-cyclocitral formation. Furthermore, acidification with a 1-h storage was more effective than heating when comparing the obtained amounts. The present results indicated that β-cyclocitral did not exist as the intact form in cells, because it was formed by heating or acidification of the resulting intermediates during the analysis by SPME. The obtained results would be helpful to understand the formation and role of β-cyclocitral in an aquatic environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds from Cyanobacteria)
Open AccessFeature PaperCommunication
Neo-Aplysiatoxin A Isolated from Okinawan Cyanobacterium Moorea Producens
Molecules 2020, 25(3), 457; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25030457 - 22 Jan 2020
Abstract
A new aplysiatoxin derivative, neo-aplysiatoxin A (1), along with seven known compounds, neo-debromoaplysiatoxin A (2), dolastatin 3 (3), lyngbic acid (4), malyngamide M (5), hermitamide A (6), (−)-loliolide (7), [...] Read more.
A new aplysiatoxin derivative, neo-aplysiatoxin A (1), along with seven known compounds, neo-debromoaplysiatoxin A (2), dolastatin 3 (3), lyngbic acid (4), malyngamide M (5), hermitamide A (6), (−)-loliolide (7), and (+)-epiloliolide (8), was isolated from the Okinawan cyanobacterium Moorea producens. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data, including high-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. The compounds were evaluated for cytotoxic and diatom growth inhibition activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds from Cyanobacteria)
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