E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Natural Bioactives in Anti-Obesity Therapy"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Min-Hsiung Pan

Institute of Food Science & Technology, National Taiwan University, No.1, Sec.4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (ROC)
Website | E-Mail
Interests: cancer chemoprevention; anti-obesity; dietary natural bioactive compounds; anti-inflammation; carcinogenesis
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Filomena Conforti

Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Calabria, I-87036 Rende (CS), Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: phytochemical compounds; ethnopharmacology; alimurgic plants; biological activity of natural compounds; phytocosmetics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Obesity is a current global epidemic that has led to a marked increase in metabolic diseases. The risk factors for obesity include genetic and non-genetic factors alike, such as age, physiological condition, dietary behaviors and lifestyle. Since 1980, the number of obese people in the world has doubled. The cause of death from being underweight has shifted to obesity in most countries; moreover, obesity is a major risk factor in some chronic diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies have highlighted the important role of gut microbiota in obesity and metabolic disorders. Therefore, obesity is a serious health problem. To reduce body weight and adiposity, a change in lifestyle habits is still the crucial cornerstone. Physical activity might be helpful in the prevention of obesity by elevating average daily metabolic rate and increased energy expenditure. Unfortunately, this clinical approach is not long-term lasting and weight regain is often seen. Drugs that prevent weight regain appear necessary in obesity treatment. Although there are many methods and drugs to help people to fight obesity, or to maintain their body weight in order to prevent obesity, each method or drug has their limitations and side effects.

Recently, natural products are popular on the anti-obesity market. More and more research addresses finding natural bioactives from dietary or herbal plants that prevent or control obesity via a chemopreventive strategy. Many dietary bioactives isolated from fruits, vegetables and edible plants, such as anthocyanins from blueberries, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) from green tea, nobiletin from citrus peel, and curcumin from turmeric, resveratrol and pterostilbene from berries have been reported for their anti-obesity ability in vivo or in vitro. These natural compounds can decrease fat accumulation through inhibiting adipocyte differentiation, adipogenesis, decreasing triacylglycerol level in high-fat-diet-induced obesity animal models by enhancing lipolysis or reducing lipogenesis pathways.

Research articles or reviews covering all kinds of natural compounds, such as polyphenols, stilbenes, alkaloids, terpenoids, tannins, saponins, glycosides, flavonoids, or derivatives, and their possible mechanisms for reducing fat accumulation or helping to control obesity and obesity related diseases are welcome for inclusion in this Special Issue of Molecules.

Prof. Dr. Min-Hsiung Pan
Prof. Dr. Filomena Conforti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • obesity
  • natural bioactives
  • gut microbiota
  • energy balance
  • lipogenesis
  • inflammation
  • high fat diet

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (7 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-7
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Phytochemical and Biological Profile of Moricandia arvensis (L.) DC.: An Inhibitor of Pancreatic Lipase
Molecules 2018, 23(11), 2829; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23112829
Received: 11 October 2018 / Revised: 24 October 2018 / Accepted: 29 October 2018 / Published: 31 October 2018
PDF Full-text (474 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pancreatic lipase, a key enzyme for lipid absorption, is one of the most important targets for the treatment of obesity, while natural compounds have recently attracted much interest as potential inhibitors of this enzyme. Here, in an attempt to find new effective agents,
[...] Read more.
Pancreatic lipase, a key enzyme for lipid absorption, is one of the most important targets for the treatment of obesity, while natural compounds have recently attracted much interest as potential inhibitors of this enzyme. Here, in an attempt to find new effective agents, the methanolic extract from Moricandia arvensis (L.) DC. and its sub-extracts were investigated for their potential inhibitory activity. The ability to inhibit pancreatic lipase was verified through the in vitro evaluation of the prevention of p-nitrophenyl caprylate hydrolysis. The antioxidant activity was also verified by means of DPPH and β-carotene bleaching tests. Compositional profiling revealed that flavonoid glycosides were the main specialized metabolites present in the methanolic extract from the aerial parts of the plant with kaempferol and quercetin representing the two O-glycosylated aglycones. Kaempferol-3-O-β-(2″-O-glucosyl)-rutinoside and kaempferol-3-O-a-arabinosyl-7-O-rhamnoside were the most abundant flavonols. The crude methanolic extract and the dichloromethane and ethyl acetate sub-extracts showed a strong lipase inhibitory activity, with IC50 values of 2.06 ± 0.02, 1.52 ± 0.02 and 1.31 ± 0.02 mg/mL, respectively. The best capacity to scavenge DPPH radical was detected for the ethyl acetate sub-extract (IC50 = 171.9 ± 1.0 µg/mL), which was also effective in protecting linoleic acid from peroxidation (IC50 = 35.69 ± 2.30 µg/mL). Obtained results support the hypothesis that M. arvensis can be a source of bioactive phytochemicals for the pharmacological inhibition of dietary lipids absorption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Bioactives in Anti-Obesity Therapy)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Purified Phlorizin from DocynIa Indica (Wall.) Decne by HSCCC, Compared with Whole Extract, Phlorizin and Non-Phlorizin Fragment Ameliorate Obesity, Insulin Resistance, and Improves Intestinal Barrier Function in High-Fat-Diet-Fed Mice
Molecules 2018, 23(10), 2701; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23102701
Received: 26 September 2018 / Revised: 16 October 2018 / Accepted: 17 October 2018 / Published: 19 October 2018
PDF Full-text (2158 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Natural products generally contain complex and multiple bioactive compounds that are responsible for the effects on health through complicated synergistic and/or suppressive actions. As an important raw material of local ethnic minority tea, ethnomedicines and food supplements in southwestern areas of China, Docynia
[...] Read more.
Natural products generally contain complex and multiple bioactive compounds that are responsible for the effects on health through complicated synergistic and/or suppressive actions. As an important raw material of local ethnic minority tea, ethnomedicines and food supplements in southwestern areas of China, Docynia indica (Wall.) Decne (DID) mainly consists of phlorizin (PHZ), which is the main active component. In this study, the holistic activities and the interactions of components of PHZ, non-phlorizin (NP) in the DID extract (DIDE) were evaluated. A rapid and effective high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) was performed to knock out PHZ from DIDE and the purity of PHZ was 96.01% determined by HPLC, with a recovery rate of 96.76%. After 13 weeks of treatment course in a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice model, the results revealed that the DIDE and PHZ significantly decreased weight gain, blood lipid levels, hyperplasia of adipocytes and alleviated inflammation (p < 0.05). Both DIDE and PHZ improves insulin resistance (p < 0.001). Meanwhile, the intestinal barrier function was improved compared to HFD group, through the determination of serum lipopolysaccharides (LPS), glucagon-likepeptide-2 (GLP-2) and hematoxylin-eosin staining of jejunum. Interestingly, after NP treatment, the metabolic syndrome of the HFD-induced obesity appeared to have a similar improvement. All the experiments showed that there is a synergistic weakening phenomenon when PHZ and NP interact with each other in the mixed state. In conclusion, for the PHZ and NP showing a good effect on anti-obesity, anti-inflammation, and intestinal barrier function, DIDE could be a good source of functional food to prevent obesity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Bioactives in Anti-Obesity Therapy)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle The Effects of Berberine on the Gut Microbiota in Apc min/+ Mice Fed with a High Fat Diet
Molecules 2018, 23(9), 2298; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23092298
Received: 28 July 2018 / Revised: 19 August 2018 / Accepted: 6 September 2018 / Published: 8 September 2018
PDF Full-text (2334 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Background: Berberine (BBR) has been extensively reported to inhibit colorectal cancer (CRC) development, though its bioavailability is poor. Nowadays, an increasing number of studies have shown that BBR significantly accumulates in the intestines and could regulate gut microbiota in obesity. The purpose of
[...] Read more.
Background: Berberine (BBR) has been extensively reported to inhibit colorectal cancer (CRC) development, though its bioavailability is poor. Nowadays, an increasing number of studies have shown that BBR significantly accumulates in the intestines and could regulate gut microbiota in obesity. The purpose of this study was to further explore the effects of BBR on gut microbiota in Apc min/+ mice receiving a high fat diet (HFD). Methods: Apc min/+ mice received either HFD alone or HFD and BBR for 12 weeks. The intestinal tissues were collected to evaluate the efficiency of BBR on neoplasm development by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Meanwhile, immunohistochemistry was conducted to investigate the effects of BBR on cyclin D1 and β-catenin in colon tissues. Fecal samples were subjected to 16S rRNA sequencing. Results: BBR significantly reduced intestinal tumor development and altered the structure of gut microbiota in Apc min/+ mice fed with an HFD. At the phylum level, it was able to significantly inhibit the increase in Verrucomicrobia. At the genus level, it was able to suppress Akkermansia and elevate some short chain fat acid (SCFA)-producing bacteria. Conclusions: BBR significantly alleviated the development of CRC in Apc min/+ mice fed with HFD and restored the enteric microbiome community. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Bioactives in Anti-Obesity Therapy)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Inclusion of Fructooligosaccharide and Resistant Maltodextrin in High Fat Diets Promotes Simultaneous Improvements on Body Fat Reduction and Fecal Parameters
Molecules 2018, 23(9), 2169; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23092169
Received: 6 August 2018 / Revised: 23 August 2018 / Accepted: 27 August 2018 / Published: 28 August 2018
PDF Full-text (209 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study investigated the effects of incorporating a mixture of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) and resistant maltodextrin (RMD) at a ratio of 1:2 on body fat accumulation and fecal bacterial parameters in rats. Our results indicated that high dietary fat consumption might effectively (p
[...] Read more.
This study investigated the effects of incorporating a mixture of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) and resistant maltodextrin (RMD) at a ratio of 1:2 on body fat accumulation and fecal bacterial parameters in rats. Our results indicated that high dietary fat consumption might effectively (p < 0.05) increase body fat, but consequently inducing a significantly (p < 0.05) higher growth of C. perfringens and retarded growth (p < 0.05) of the Bifidobacterium spp. in the large intestine. As compared with the high fat control, an incorporation of the FOS and RMD mixture at a high dose (0.97 and 1.94 g/kg body weight, respectively) could result in a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in feed efficiency (−16%), total visceral fat (−17.4%), non-visceral fat levels (−20.3%), and total body fat (−19.2%). Furthermore, feeding the FOS and RMD mixture at a high dose was capable to counter the above undesirable impacts by reducing the C. perfringens count (−14.8%) and increasing the total Bifidobacterium count (134.4%) and total fecal short chain fatty acids (195.4%). A supplementation of adequate amount of FOS and RMD might confer a concreted solution to the obesity and deteriorated fecal bacteria profiles due to high fat consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Bioactives in Anti-Obesity Therapy)
Open AccessArticle Modulatory Effect of Polyphenolic Compounds from the Mangrove Tree Rhizophora mangle L. on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Insulin Resistance in High-Fat Diet Obese Mice
Molecules 2018, 23(9), 2114; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23092114
Received: 12 July 2018 / Revised: 5 August 2018 / Accepted: 11 August 2018 / Published: 22 August 2018
PDF Full-text (3177 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
No scientific report proves the action of the phytochemicals from the mangrove tree Rhizophora mangle in the treatment of diabetes. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effects of the acetonic extract of R. mangle barks (AERM) on type 2 diabetes.
[...] Read more.
No scientific report proves the action of the phytochemicals from the mangrove tree Rhizophora mangle in the treatment of diabetes. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effects of the acetonic extract of R. mangle barks (AERM) on type 2 diabetes. The main chemical constituents of the extract were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and flow injection analysis electrospray-iontrap mass spectrometry (FIA-ESI-IT-MS/MS). High-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice were used as model of type 2 diabetes associated with obesity. After 4 weeks of AERM 5 or 50 mg/kg/day orally, glucose homeostasis was evaluated by insulin tolerance test (kiTT). Hepatic steatosis, triglycerides and gene expression were also evaluated. AERM consists of catechin, quercetin and chlorogenic acids derivatives. These metabolites have nutritional importance, obese mice treated with AERM (50 mg/kg) presented improvements in insulin resistance resulting in hepatic steatosis reductions associated with a strong inhibition of hepatic mRNA levels of CD36. The beneficial effects of AERM in an obesity model could be associated with its inhibitory α-amylase activity detected in vitro. Rhizophora mangle partially reverses insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis associated with obesity, supporting previous claims in traditional knowledge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Bioactives in Anti-Obesity Therapy)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Anti-Obesity Effects of Medicinal and Edible Mushrooms
Molecules 2018, 23(11), 2880; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23112880
Received: 27 September 2018 / Revised: 29 October 2018 / Accepted: 2 November 2018 / Published: 5 November 2018
PDF Full-text (1981 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Obesity is a group of metabolic disorders caused by multiple factors, including heredity, diet, lifestyle, societal determinants, environment, and infectious agents, which can all lead to the enhancement of storage body fat. Excess visceral fat mass in adipose tissue generate several metabolic disorders,
[...] Read more.
Obesity is a group of metabolic disorders caused by multiple factors, including heredity, diet, lifestyle, societal determinants, environment, and infectious agents, which can all lead to the enhancement of storage body fat. Excess visceral fat mass in adipose tissue generate several metabolic disorders, including cardiovascular diseases with chronic inflammation based pathophysiology. The objective of the current review is to summarize the cellular mechanisms of obesity that attenuate by antioxidant potentials of medicinal and edible mushrooms. Studies have showed that mushrooms potentially have antioxidant capacities, which increase the antioxidant defense systems in cells. They boost anti-inflammatory actions and thereby protect against obesity-related hypertension and dyslipidemia. The practice of regular consumption of mushrooms is effective in the treatment of metabolic syndrome, including obesity, and thus could be a good candidate for use in future pharmaceutical or nutraceutical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Bioactives in Anti-Obesity Therapy)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview Current Therapies Focused on High-Density Lipoproteins Associated with Cardiovascular Disease
Molecules 2018, 23(11), 2730; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23112730
Received: 12 September 2018 / Revised: 20 October 2018 / Accepted: 21 October 2018 / Published: 23 October 2018
PDF Full-text (3540 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
High-density lipoproteins (HDL) comprise a heterogeneous family of lipoprotein particles divided into subclasses that are determined by density, size and surface charge as well as protein composition. Epidemiological studies have suggested an inverse correlation between High-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and the risk of
[...] Read more.
High-density lipoproteins (HDL) comprise a heterogeneous family of lipoprotein particles divided into subclasses that are determined by density, size and surface charge as well as protein composition. Epidemiological studies have suggested an inverse correlation between High-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and the risk of cardiovascular diseases and atherosclerosis. HDLs promote reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and have several atheroprotective functions such as anti-inflammation, anti-thrombosis, and anti-oxidation. HDLs are considered to be atheroprotective because they are associated in serum with paraoxonases (PONs) which protect HDL from oxidation. Polyphenol consumption reduces the risk of chronic diseases in humans. Polyphenols increase the binding of HDL to PON1, increasing the catalytic activity of PON1. This review summarizes the evidence currently available regarding pharmacological and alternative treatments aimed at improving the functionality of HDL-C. Information on the effectiveness of the treatments has contributed to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate plasma levels of HDL-C, thereby promoting the development of more effective treatment of cardiovascular diseases. For that purpose, Scopus and Medline databases were searched to identify the publications investigating the impact of current therapies focused on high-density lipoproteins. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Bioactives in Anti-Obesity Therapy)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Tentative title: Bioactive components and biological properties of Allium cepa L.: Focus on potential benefits in the treatment of obesity and related comorbidities
Authors: Mariangela Marrelli *, Valentina Amodeo, Giancarlo Statti and Filomena Conforti
Affiliation: Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Calabria, I-87036 Rende (CS), Italy
Abstract: Common onion (Allium cepa L.) is one of the oldest cultivated plant, utilized worldwide as both vegetable and flavoring. This species is known to contain sulfur amino acids together with many vitamins and minerals. A variety of secondary metabolites, including flavonoids, phytosterols and saponins, have also been identified. Despite the predominant use of this plant as food, a wide range of beneficial effects have also been proved. Different biological properties, such as antioxidant, antimicrobial, antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet and antiosteoporotic, have been reported. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of chemical composition and biological activities of this species. Both in vitro and in vivo effects of Allium cepa L. are presented and discussed. The most interesting isolated active principles and their biological properties are reported, with a focus on recent beneficial effects in the treatment of obesity and related comorbidities, such as hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia.
 
Author: Huei-Jane Lee  
Affiliation: Chung Shan Medical University, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Taichung, Taiwan
 
Author: Maria Perticone  
Affiliation: Universita degli studi Magna Graecia di Catanzaro, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Catanzaro, Italy 
 
Author: Ju-Ock Nam 
Affiliation: Kyungpook Natl Univ, South Korea
 
Back to Top