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Trends in Analysis of Inorganic Pollutants

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Inorganic Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021) | Viewed by 10531

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Ruđer Bošković Institute, Division for Marine and Environmental Research, Bijenička Cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: trace elements; toxic metals; environmental geochemistry; water quality; environmental pollution; mass spectrometry
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Guest Editor
Ruđer Bošković Institute, Division for Marine and Environmental Research, Bijenička cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: geochemistry; environmental chemistry; environmental pollution; analytical chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Unprecedented economic growth results in the continuous release of various organic and inorganic pollutants, both existing and new, into the environment. Although many inorganic pollutants have been the subject of numerous studies for decades, the emergence of new substances requires further intensive work on this topic. Namely, emerging pollutants include various synthetic or natural chemicals or microorganisms that are suspected to have a detrimental effect on ecosystems and human health, but their occurrence in the environment is currently not monitored nor regulated. Their widespread presence in pharmaceuticals or personal care products, pesticides, industrial and household products, metals, industrial additives, solvents, etc. presupposes their continuous discharge and accumulation in different parts of the environment. Many of them are believed to cause chronic toxicity, endocrine disorders in humans and aquatic wildlife, as well as the development of resistance to bacterial pathogens, even in very small amounts. 

We invite authors to contribute to this Special Issue by submitting original research or review articles related to inorganic pollutants, in particular, their analysis and the advantages and limitations of the current state-of-the-art.

Dr. Željka Fiket
Dr. Martina Furdek
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Inorganic pollutants
  • Analysis
  • Anthropogenic influence
  • Emerging pollutants
  • Metals and metalloids
  • Environmental pollution

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 742 KiB  
Article
Method Validation for Determination of Thallium by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and Monitoring of Various Foods in South Korea
by Yeon-hee Kim, Wook-jin Ra, Solyi Cho, Shinai Choi, Bokyung Soh, Yongsung Joo and Kwang-Won Lee
Molecules 2021, 26(21), 6729; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26216729 - 6 Nov 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2725
Abstract
Thallium (Tl) is a rare element and one of the most harmful metals. This study validated an analytical method for determining Tl in foods by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) based on food matrices and calories. For six representative foods, the method’s [...] Read more.
Thallium (Tl) is a rare element and one of the most harmful metals. This study validated an analytical method for determining Tl in foods by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) based on food matrices and calories. For six representative foods, the method’s correlation coefficient (R2) was above 0.999, and the method limit of detection (MLOD) was 0.0070–0.0498 μg kg−1, with accuracy ranging from 82.06% to 119.81% and precision within 10%. We investigated 304 various foods in the South Korean market, including agricultural, fishery, livestock, and processed foods. Tl above the MLOD level was detected in 148 samples and was less than 10 μg kg−1 in 98% of the samples. Comparing the Tl concentrations among food groups revealed that fisheries and animal products had higher Tl contents than cereals and vegetables. Tl exposure via food intake did not exceed the health guidance level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Analysis of Inorganic Pollutants)
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15 pages, 1840 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Potential Release Tendency of Metals and Metalloids from the Estuarine Sediments: Case Study of Raša Bay
by Željka Fiket, Marija Petrović, Gordana Medunić, Tatjana Ivošević, Tomislav Fiket, Lizzy Zhang Xu, Yan Wang and Shiming Ding
Molecules 2021, 26(21), 6656; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26216656 - 3 Nov 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2155
Abstract
Assessing the environmental quality of coastal systems is important not only for the management and protection of such areas, but also for improving the quality of water resources. Since sediment itself can often be a source of certain toxic elements, in addition to [...] Read more.
Assessing the environmental quality of coastal systems is important not only for the management and protection of such areas, but also for improving the quality of water resources. Since sediment itself can often be a source of certain toxic elements, in addition to information on the distribution of metals in the water column and in the sediment itself, it is useful to determine the bioavailable forms of individual elements, particularly toxic ones. In this study, water and sediment geochemical data were supplemented with oxyanion mobility in sediments estimated by diffusion gradients in thin film (DGTs). The data obtained indicate that the chemical composition of the water in the Raša River estuary primarily reflects the high input of suspended sediment from the catchment, the mixing of freshwater and seawater, and to a lesser extent the effects of anthropogenic activities. Although sediment composition is primarily determined by geological and hydrodynamic conditions in the catchment, it also indicates moderate enrichment in Co, Cr, Mo and Ni. In contrast, the distribution of oxyanions in sediment pore water indicates the influence of sediment as a source of some elements in the bottom water; e.g., sediment contributes to 40% of the arsenic bottom water budget. The obtained depth profiles of the oxyanion distribution in the sediment pore water indicate an early onset of suboxic to anoxic conditions in Raša Bay, which is prone to rapid sedimentation. All this demonstrates the need to consider the bioavailable forms of elements when assessing environmental quality, as the lack of such information can lead to an incomplete assessment, especially in dynamic coastal systems such as estuaries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Analysis of Inorganic Pollutants)
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13 pages, 1767 KiB  
Article
Accumulation of Major, Minor and Trace Elements in Pine Needles (Pinus nigra) in Vienna (Austria)
by Michaela Zeiner and Iva Juranović Cindrić
Molecules 2021, 26(11), 3318; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26113318 - 1 Jun 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2564
Abstract
Increasing heavy metal pollution in the environment and the fact that pine needles are good bio-monitors for air pollutants was the reason to investigate their accumulation in pine needles in Vienna (Austria). Pinus nigra is widespread over the city, thus allowing the study [...] Read more.
Increasing heavy metal pollution in the environment and the fact that pine needles are good bio-monitors for air pollutants was the reason to investigate their accumulation in pine needles in Vienna (Austria). Pinus nigra is widespread over the city, thus allowing the study of different parameters influencing metal accumulation. The sampling sites were chosen based on traffic volume (low, medium, high). Fresh shoots were collected alongside one-year-old needles once per week from May to August 2015. The needle samples were washed and dried prior to acidic microwave-assisted digestion followed by quantitative determination using spectrometric methods. The investigation was focused on the following elements: Ag, Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, U, V, and Zn. The one-year-old needles mainly contained higher contents of elements than fresh shoots; in many cases, the values differed statistically significantly. By correlating needle elemental contents with the sampling site, statistically significant differences were registered for the majority of the investigated elements. These differences originate from the local traffic situation, soil elemental levels, translocation processes, and not traffic-related sources. No general trend of metal accumulation from spring to summer was registered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Analysis of Inorganic Pollutants)
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15 pages, 3338 KiB  
Article
Redox Speciation of Vanadium in Estuarine Waters Using Improved Methodology Based on Anion Exchange Chromatography Coupled to HR ICP-MS System
by Lucija Knežević, Dario Omanović, Niko Bačić, Jelena Mandić and Elvira Bura-Nakić
Molecules 2021, 26(9), 2436; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26092436 - 22 Apr 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2345
Abstract
An improved methodology was developed for V redox speciation in estuarine waters using a hyphenated technique consisting of ion chromatograph (IC) with an anion exchange column and a high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (HR ICP-MS). This approach enables the direct determination of [...] Read more.
An improved methodology was developed for V redox speciation in estuarine waters using a hyphenated technique consisting of ion chromatograph (IC) with an anion exchange column and a high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (HR ICP-MS). This approach enables the direct determination of V(V), whereas reduced species (mainly V(IV)) are calculated by subtracting V(V) concentrations from the measured total V concentration. Based on the “on-column” V(V) chelation mechanism by EDTA, with the eluent composed of 40 mmol L−1 ammonium bicarbonate, 40 mmol L−1 ammonium sulphate, 8 mmol L−1 ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and 3% acetonitrile, the method was successfully used for analyses of V redox speciation in samples taken in the vertical salinity gradient of the highly stratified Krka River estuary. Due to the matrix effects causing different sensitivities, a standard addition method was used for V(V) quantification purposes. The limit of detection (LOD) was also found to be matrix related: 101.68 ng L−1 in the seawater and 30.56 µg L−1 in the freshwater. Performed stability tests showed that V redox speciation is preserved at least 7 days in un-treated samples, possibly due to the stabilization of V-reduced species with natural organic matter (NOM). The dominant V form in the analysed samples was V(V) with the reduced V(IV) accounting for up to 26% of the total dissolved pool. The concentration of V(IV) was found to correlate negatively with the oxygen concentration. Significant removal of dissolved V was detected in oxygen depleted zones possibly related to the particle scavenging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Analysis of Inorganic Pollutants)
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