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Capsicum: Traditional Uses, Biactive Compounds and Biological Activities

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020) | Viewed by 17496

Special Issue Editors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bioactive compounds extracted from medicinal plants and their usage as therapeutical agents have evolved with human history. Presently, this area has become an important research domain in biomedical and natural product research. Capsicum-related compounds have a myriad of efeccts, antioxidant and anti‑inflammatory properties, analgesic and anti-nociceptive efects, with potential use in the management of different painful and inflammatory conditions. Moreover, its possible chemopreventive roles may open new research avenues in various areas of biomedical sciences.

This Special Issue will host papers related to recent developments in the biomedical domain related to capsicum components and it will include but not be limited to capsaicin effects on cellular functions in physiology and in diseases; proteomic, metabolomic, and genomic studies on the mechanistic of capsaicin regulation; and nanoformulation of capsaicin compounds used in therapy

Dr. Teodora Monica Neagu
Dr. Constantin Caruntu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • capsicum
  • capsaicin
  • antioxidant
  • antitumoral

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

17 pages, 715 KiB  
Review
The Effects of Capsaicin on Gastrointestinal Cancers
by George Denis Alexandru Popescu, Cristian Scheau, Ioana Anca Badarau, Mihai-Daniel Dumitrache, Ana Caruntu, Andreea-Elena Scheau, Daniel Octavian Costache, Raluca Simona Costache, Carolina Constantin, Monica Neagu and Constantin Caruntu
Molecules 2021, 26(1), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26010094 - 28 Dec 2020
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 6432
Abstract
Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are a group of diseases with very high positions in the ranking of cancer incidence and mortality. While they show common features regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in cancer development, organ-specific pathophysiological processes may trigger distinct signaling pathways and intricate [...] Read more.
Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are a group of diseases with very high positions in the ranking of cancer incidence and mortality. While they show common features regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in cancer development, organ-specific pathophysiological processes may trigger distinct signaling pathways and intricate interactions with inflammatory cells from the tumoral milieu and mediators involved in tumorigenesis. The treatment of GI cancers is a topic of increasing interest due to the severity of these diseases, their impact on the patients’ survivability and quality of life, and the burden they set on the healthcare system. As the efficiency of existing drugs is hindered by chemoresistance and adverse reactions when administered in high doses, new therapies are sought, and emerging drugs, formulations, and substance synergies are the focus of a growing number of studies. A class of chemicals with great potential through anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and anti-tumoral effects is phytochemicals, and capsaicin in particular is the subject of intensive research looking to validate its position in complementing cancer treatment. Our paper thoroughly reviews the available scientific evidence concerning the effects of capsaicin on major GI cancers and its interactions with the molecular pathways involved in the course of these diseases. Full article
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23 pages, 1125 KiB  
Review
Capsaicin and Gut Microbiota in Health and Disease
by Adrian Eugen Rosca, Mara Ioana Iesanu, Carmen Denise Mihaela Zahiu, Suzana Elena Voiculescu, Alexandru Catalin Paslaru and Ana-Maria Zagrean
Molecules 2020, 25(23), 5681; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25235681 - 2 Dec 2020
Cited by 47 | Viewed by 10179
Abstract
Capsaicin is a widespread spice known for its analgesic qualities. Although a comprehensive body of evidence suggests pleiotropic benefits of capsaicin, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-proliferative, metabolic, or cardioprotective effects, it is frequently avoided due to reported digestive side-effects. As the gut bacterial profile [...] Read more.
Capsaicin is a widespread spice known for its analgesic qualities. Although a comprehensive body of evidence suggests pleiotropic benefits of capsaicin, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-proliferative, metabolic, or cardioprotective effects, it is frequently avoided due to reported digestive side-effects. As the gut bacterial profile is strongly linked to diet and capsaicin displays modulatory effects on gut microbiota, a new hypothesis has recently emerged about its possible applicability against widespread pathologies, such as metabolic and inflammatory diseases. The present review explores the capsaicin–microbiota crosstalk and capsaicin effect on dysbiosis, and illustrates the intimate mechanisms that underlie its action in preventing the onset or development of pathologies like obesity, diabetes, or inflammatory bowel diseases. A possible antimicrobial property of capsaicin, mediated by the beneficial alteration of microbiota, is also discussed. However, as data are coming mostly from experimental models, caution is needed in translating these findings to humans. Full article
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