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Special Issue "Lignans II"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. David Barker
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Chemical Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand
Interests: natural product total synthesis; medicinal chemistry; asymmetric synthesis; lignans; polymeric materials; anti-cancer treatments; synthesis from biowaste-derived materials; isotopically labelled materials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are planning a second volume of the Special Issue on lignans to highlight current research on this important class of natural products. Lignans are are a class of secondary metabolites that are derived from the dimersation of two or more phenylpropanoid units. They are found with vast structural diversity, and it is well-established that this class of compounds exhibit a range of potent biological activities. Lignans have proven to be challenging and desirable synthetic targets and have instigated the development of a number of different synthetic methods, advancing our collective knowledge towards the synthesis of complex and unique structures.

This second volume of the Special Issue will focus on current research involving lignans, ranging in scope from recent isolation and structural elucidation of new compounds, biosynthetic studies to explore their origins, synthetic work towards lignan natural products and the use of lignans as synthetic precursors for other complex molecules. Further, the assessment of their biological activities and potential for further therapeutic development can also be reported.

Assoc. Prof. David Barker
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Lignans
  • Polyphenols
  • Total synthesis
  • Bioactive compounds
  • Biosynthesis
  • Antioxidants
  • Natural products
  • Phenyl propanoids

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Distribution Patterns for Bioactive Constituents in Pericarp, Stalk and Seed of Forsythiae Fructus
Molecules 2020, 25(2), 340; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25020340 (registering DOI) - 14 Jan 2020
Abstract
Forsythiae Fructus (FF) is a widely used folk medicine in China, Japan, and Korea. The distribution of bioactive constituents throughout the fruit segments has rarely been addressed, although mounting evidence suggests that plant secondary metabolites are synthesized and distributed regularly. The phytochemical profiles [...] Read more.
Forsythiae Fructus (FF) is a widely used folk medicine in China, Japan, and Korea. The distribution of bioactive constituents throughout the fruit segments has rarely been addressed, although mounting evidence suggests that plant secondary metabolites are synthesized and distributed regularly. The phytochemical profiles of three segments of FF (pericarp, stalk and seed) were firstly revealed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based quantitative analysis of twenty-one bioactive constituents, including three phenylethanoid glycosides, five lignans, eight flavonoids, and five phenolic acids to explore the spatial distribution of bioactive constituents. Furthermore, the hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) and one-way analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA) were conducted to visualize and verify the distribution regularity of twenty-one analytes among three segments. The results showed that phytochemical profiles of the three segments were similar, i.e., phenylethanoid glycosides covering the most part were the predominant compounds, followed by lignans, flavonoids and phenolic acids. Nevertheless, the abundance of twenty-one bioactive constituents among three segments was different. Specifically, phenylethanoid glycosides were highly expressed in the seed; lignans were primarily enriched in the stalk; flavonoids were largely concentrated in the pericarp, while the contents of phenolic acids showed no much difference among various segments. The research improves our understanding of distribution patterns for bioactive constituents in FF, and also complements some scientific data for further exploring the quality formation mechanism of FF. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lignans II)
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Open AccessArticle
Assaying Chlamydia pneumoniae Persistence in Monocyte-Derived Macrophages Identifies Dibenzocyclooctadiene Lignans as Phenotypic Switchers
Molecules 2020, 25(2), 294; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25020294 - 11 Jan 2020
Abstract
Antibiotic-tolerant persister bacteria involve frequent treatment failures, relapsing infections and the need for extended antibiotic treatment. The virulence of an intracellular human pathogen C. pneumoniae is tightly linked to its propensity for persistence and means for its chemosensitization are urgently needed. In the [...] Read more.
Antibiotic-tolerant persister bacteria involve frequent treatment failures, relapsing infections and the need for extended antibiotic treatment. The virulence of an intracellular human pathogen C. pneumoniae is tightly linked to its propensity for persistence and means for its chemosensitization are urgently needed. In the current work, persistence of C. pneumoniae clinical isolate CV6 was studied in THP-1 macrophages using quantitative PCR and quantitative culture. A dibenzocyclooctadiene lignan schisandrin reverted C. pneumoniae persistence and promoted productive infection. The concomitant administration of schisandrin and azithromycin resulted in significantly improved bacterial eradication compared to sole azithromycin treatment. In addition, the closely related lignan schisandrin C was superior to azithromycin in eradicating the C. pneumoniae infection from the macrophages. The observed chemosensitization of C. pneumoniae was associated with the suppression of cellular glutathione pools by the lignans, implying to a previously unknown aspect of chlamydia–host interactions. These data indicate that schisandrin lignans induce a phenotypic switch in C. pneumoniae, promoting the productive and antibiotic-susceptible phenotype instead of persistence. By this means, these medicinal plant -derived compounds show potential as adjuvant therapies for intracellular bacteria resuscitation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lignans II)
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Open AccessArticle
Insights into Lignan Composition and Biosynthesis in Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica L.)
Molecules 2019, 24(21), 3863; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24213863 - 26 Oct 2019
Abstract
Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L.) has been used as herbal medicine to treat various ailments since ancient times. The biological activity of nettle is chiefly attributed to a large group of phenylpropanoid dimers, namely lignans. Despite the pharmacological importance of nettle lignans, [...] Read more.
Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L.) has been used as herbal medicine to treat various ailments since ancient times. The biological activity of nettle is chiefly attributed to a large group of phenylpropanoid dimers, namely lignans. Despite the pharmacological importance of nettle lignans, there are no studies addressing lignan biosynthesis in this plant. We herein identified 14 genes encoding dirigent proteins (UdDIRs) and 3 pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase genes (UdPLRs) in nettle, which are two gene families known to be associated with lignan biosynthesis. Expression profiling of these genes on different organs/tissues revealed a specific expression pattern. Particularly, UdDIR7, 12 and 13 displayed a remarkable high expression in the top internode, fibre tissues of bottom internodes and roots, respectively. The relatively high expression of UdPLR1 and UdPLR2 in the young internodes, core tissue of bottom internode and roots is consistent with the high accumulation of lariciresinol and secoisolariciresinol in these tissues. Lignan quantification showed a high abundance of pinoresinol in roots and pinoresinol diglucosides in young internodes and leaves. This study sheds light on lignan composition and biosynthesis in nettle, providing a good basis for further functional analysis of DIRs and PLRs and, ultimately, engineering lignan metabolism in planta and in cell cultures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lignans II)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Lignans and Their Derivatives from Plants as Antivirals
Molecules 2020, 25(1), 183; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25010183 - 01 Jan 2020
Abstract
Lignans are widely produced by various plant species; they are a class of natural products that share structural similarity. They usually contain a core scaffold that is formed by two or more phenylpropanoid units. Lignans possess diverse pharmacological properties, including their antiviral activities [...] Read more.
Lignans are widely produced by various plant species; they are a class of natural products that share structural similarity. They usually contain a core scaffold that is formed by two or more phenylpropanoid units. Lignans possess diverse pharmacological properties, including their antiviral activities that have been reported in recent years. This review discusses the distribution of lignans in nature according to their structural classification, and it provides a comprehensive summary of their antiviral activities. Among them, two types of antiviral lignans—podophyllotoxin and bicyclol, which are used to treat venereal warts and chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in clinical, serve as examples of using lignans for antivirals—are discussed in some detail. Prospects of lignans in antiviral drug discovery are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lignans II)
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