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Applications of Nanoparticles in Catalysis, Sensing, and Biomedicine

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 2170

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Material Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan
Interests: synthesis and applications of nanomaterials; green-energy materials; biomedical sensing; material analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanoparticles refer to tiny particles with dimensions ranging from 1 to 100 nm. Their small size and unique physical, chemical, or biological properties make them attractive for various applications, including in catalysis, sensing, and biomedicine. For example, they can be used as catalysts to accelerate chemical reactions, as probes to detect and quantify analytes in complex samples, and in drug delivery and imaging for biomedical applications. Their small size and unique properties make them attractive for various applications, and they have shown great potential in advancing these fields.

This Special Issue aims to publish recent original research articles, communications, and review articles relevant to the rational design of various nanoparticles in the catalytic, sensing, and biomedicine fields, including the construction of metal, semiconductor, or insulator nanoparticles influencing their photocatalytic, electrochemical, optical, electric, or biomedicine properties.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Design and construction of nanostructures;
  • Nanoparticles for catalytic applications;
  • Nanoparticles for photocatalytic applications;
  • Nanoparticles for electrochemical applications;
  • Nanoparticles for energy applications;
  • Nanoparticles for optical sensing applications;
  • Nanoparticles for surface-enhanced Raman scatting applications;
  • Nanoparticles for chemical sensing applications;
  • Nanoparticles for biomedicine applications.

Prof. Dr. Yu-Cheng Chang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanoparticles
  • nanocomposites
  • photocatalysis
  • electrochemical catalysis
  • chemical sensing
  • optical sensing
  • surface-ehanced Raman scatting
  • biomedicine

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 9150 KiB  
Article
Catalytic Hydroconversion of Model Compounds over Ni/NiO@NC Nanoparticles
by Ting Liu, Yanxi Ma, Yakun Tang, Yue Zhang, Jingmei Liu, Xiaodong Zhou, Xiaohui Li and Lang Liu
Molecules 2024, 29(4), 755; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules29040755 - 6 Feb 2024
Viewed by 735
Abstract
The conversion of lignite into aromatic compounds by highly active catalysts is a key strategy for lignite valorization. In this study, Ni/NiO@NC nanocomposites with a high specific surface area and a vesicular structure were successfully prepared via a facile sol–gel method. The Ni/NiO@NC [...] Read more.
The conversion of lignite into aromatic compounds by highly active catalysts is a key strategy for lignite valorization. In this study, Ni/NiO@NC nanocomposites with a high specific surface area and a vesicular structure were successfully prepared via a facile sol–gel method. The Ni/NiO@NC catalysts exhibited excellent catalytic activity for the catalytic hydroconversion (CHC) of benzyloxybenzene (as lignite-related modeling compounds) under mild conditions (120 °C, 1.5 MPa H2, 60 min). The possible mechanism of the catalytic reaction was investigated by analyzing the type and content of CHC reaction products at different temperatures, pressures, and times. More importantly, the magnetic catalyst could be conveniently separated by a magnet after the reaction, and it maintained high catalytic efficiency after six reuses. This study provides an efficient and recyclable catalyst for the cleavage of >CH–O bonds in lignite, thereby offering another way for improved utilization of lignite. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Nanoparticles in Catalysis, Sensing, and Biomedicine)
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16 pages, 5808 KiB  
Article
Na2Ti3O7@RF@Ag Heterostructures as Efficient Substrates for SERS and Photocatalytic Applications
by Yu-Cheng Chang, I-Chun Lin, Ning-Chien Chin, Sin-Ei Juang and Chia-Man Chou
Molecules 2024, 29(1), 218; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules29010218 - 30 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1029
Abstract
A multi-step procedure was effectively employed to synthesize innovative three-dimensional (3D) heterostructures encompassing sodium titanate (Na2Ti3O7) nanowire cores, an intermediate resorcinol–formaldehyde (RF) layer, and outer silver (Ag) nanoparticle sheaths, referred to as Na2Ti3O [...] Read more.
A multi-step procedure was effectively employed to synthesize innovative three-dimensional (3D) heterostructures encompassing sodium titanate (Na2Ti3O7) nanowire cores, an intermediate resorcinol–formaldehyde (RF) layer, and outer silver (Ag) nanoparticle sheaths, referred to as Na2Ti3O7@RF@Ag heterostructures. Initially, a one-step hydrothermal technique facilitated the direct growth of single-crystal Na2Ti3O7 nanowires onto a flexible Ti foil. Subsequently, a two-step wet chemical process facilitated the sequential deposition of an RF layer and Ag nanoparticles onto the Na2Ti3O7 nanowires at a low reaction temperature. Optimal concentrations of silver nitrate and L-ascorbic acid can lead to the cultivation of Na2Ti3O7@RF@Ag heterostructures exhibiting heightened surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), which is particularly beneficial for the detection of rhodamine B (RhB) molecules. This phenomenon can be ascribed to the distinctive geometry of the Na2Ti3O7@RF@Ag heterostructures, which offer an increased number of hot spots and surface-active sites, thereby showcasing notable SERS enhancement, commendable reproducibility, and enduring stability over the long term. Furthermore, the Na2Ti3O7@RF@Ag heterostructures demonstrate remarkable follow-up as first-order chemical kinetic and recyclable photocatalysts for the photodecomposition of an RhB solution under UV light irradiation. This result can be attributed to the enhanced inhibition of electron–hole pair recombination and increased surface-active sites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Nanoparticles in Catalysis, Sensing, and Biomedicine)
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