molecules-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "The Future of the Cancer Treatment: The Immunotherapy Next Generation"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Amedeo Amedei
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Experimental and Clinical Internal Medicine. University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini, 06 – 50134 Firenze, Italy
Interests: immune response; T cells; cancer; microbiota; inflammation; infectious disease; autoimmune diseases
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Elena Niccolai

Guest Editor
Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy
Interests: immunology; T-lymphocytes; cancer; inflammation; microbiome

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cancer, one of the most widely spread forms of disease, is slowly taking over the world. Over time, a number of conventional cytotoxic approaches has been developed, but their limited effectiveness, in accordance with the heterogeneity of cancer cells, prompts to the constant search for new therapeutic approaches with improved outcomes, such as immunotherapy. Immunotherapy, which utilizes and enhances the normal capacity of the patient's immune system, was first used in the 19th century, but has developed to this day, and continues to do so. The main types of immunotherapeutic approaches include cancer vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, immune checkpoint inhibitors, and other non-specific therapies. After decades of intense effort, the therapeutics that leverage the immune system to contrast the cancer, have now conclusively demonstrated their effectiveness. However, the search for novel methods to improve immunotherapy continues without any reduction in intensity or strength. In this way, the use of small molecule immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of cancer are especially interesting. Small molecules can either reduce immune suppression in the tumor milieu or enhance the activation of cytotoxic lymphocyte responses to the tumor, and might be used as monotherapies or combined with other cancer therapies to increase and broaden their efficacy. Insight into the more promising immunotherapeutic approaches in the form of original research articles or reviews in all areas of cancer, experimental designs, and therapeutic approaches are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Amedeo Amedei
Dr. Elena Niccolai
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Immunotherapy
  • Immune checkpoint inhibitors
  • CAR-T cells
  • Small molecules
  • Cancer

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Open AccessReview
Role of the Neutrophil in the Pathogenesis of Advanced Cancer and Impaired Responsiveness to Therapy
Molecules 2020, 25(7), 1618; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25071618 - 01 Apr 2020
Abstract
Notwithstanding the well-recognized involvement of chronic neutrophilic inflammation in the initiation phase of many types of epithelial cancers, a growing body of evidence has also implicated these cells in the pathogenesis of the later phases of cancer development, specifically progression and spread. In [...] Read more.
Notwithstanding the well-recognized involvement of chronic neutrophilic inflammation in the initiation phase of many types of epithelial cancers, a growing body of evidence has also implicated these cells in the pathogenesis of the later phases of cancer development, specifically progression and spread. In this setting, established tumors have a propensity to induce myelopoiesis and to recruit neutrophils to the tumor microenvironment (TME), where these cells undergo reprogramming and transitioning to myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) with a pro-tumorigenic phenotype. In the TME, these MDSCs, via the production of a broad range of mediators, not only attenuate the anti-tumor activity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, but also exclude these cells from the TME. Realization of the pro-tumorigenic activities of MDSCs of neutrophilic origin has resulted in the development of a range of adjunctive strategies targeting the recruitment of these cells and/or the harmful activities of their mediators of immunosuppression. Most of these are in the pre-clinical or very early clinical stages of evaluation. Notable exceptions, however, are several pharmacologic, allosteric inhibitors of neutrophil/MDSC CXCR1/2 receptors. These agents have entered late-stage clinical assessment as adjuncts to either chemotherapy or inhibitory immune checkpoint-targeted therapy in patients with various types of advanced malignancy. The current review updates the origins and identities of MDSCs of neutrophilic origin and their spectrum of immunosuppressive mediators, as well as current and pipeline MDSC-targeted strategies as potential adjuncts to cancer therapies. These sections are preceded by a consideration of the carcinogenic potential of neutrophils. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Future of the Cancer Treatment: The Immunotherapy Next Generation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Emerging Role of the Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Family of Cytokines in Neuroblastoma. Pathogenic Effectors and Novel Therapeutic Targets?
Molecules 2020, 25(5), 1194; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25051194 - 06 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most frequent extracranial pediatric tumor. Despite the current available multiple therapeutic options, the prognosis for high-risk NB patients remains unsatisfactory and makes the disease a clear unmet medical need. Thus, more tailored therapeutic approaches are warranted to improve both [...] Read more.
Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most frequent extracranial pediatric tumor. Despite the current available multiple therapeutic options, the prognosis for high-risk NB patients remains unsatisfactory and makes the disease a clear unmet medical need. Thus, more tailored therapeutic approaches are warranted to improve both the quality of life and the survival of the patients. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays a key role in several diseases, including cancer. Preclinical and clinical studies in NB patients convergently indicate that MIF exerts pro-tumorigenic properties in NB. MIF is upregulated in NB tumor tissues and cell lines and it contributes to NB aggressiveness and immune-escape. To date, there are only a few data about the role of the second member of the MIF family, the MIF homolog d-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT), in NB. Here, we review the preclinical and clinical studies on the role of the MIF family of cytokines in NB and suggest that MIF and possibly DDT inhibitors may be promising novel prognostic and therapeutic targets in NB management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Future of the Cancer Treatment: The Immunotherapy Next Generation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Sex Differences in Cancer Immunotherapy Efficacy, Biomarkers, and Therapeutic Strategy
Molecules 2019, 24(18), 3214; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24183214 - 04 Sep 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
Sex differences in innate and adaptive immune responses are known, and women generally mount a stronger immune response than men. Cancer immunotherapy, represented by immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), has revolutionized the treatment of cancer, and sex differences in cancer immunotherapy are just starting [...] Read more.
Sex differences in innate and adaptive immune responses are known, and women generally mount a stronger immune response than men. Cancer immunotherapy, represented by immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), has revolutionized the treatment of cancer, and sex differences in cancer immunotherapy are just starting to be revealed. Here, we summarize recent research progress concerning sex differences in cancer immunotherapy efficacy. On their own, ICIs tend to be more effective in male cancer patients compared with female patients, while ICIs combined with chemotherapy tend to be more effective in female patients than male patients. Male tumors are usually more antigenic than female tumors, and this is reflected by their increased number of tumor mutations and cancer germline antigens. The biomarker tumor mutational burden (TMB), which reflects tumor antigenicity, is more effective at predicting immunotherapy response for female lung cancer patients than for male patients. In this review, we propose different therapeutic strategies for the different sexes: For male cancer patients, the immune environment should be enhanced, whereas for female cancer patients, tumor antigenicity should be enhanced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Future of the Cancer Treatment: The Immunotherapy Next Generation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop