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Special Issue "New Insights in Immune Cell Diversity: A Bridge Between the Patient Stratification and Personalized Therapies"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Immunology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Amedeo Amedei
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Experimental and Clinical Internal Medicine. University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini, 06 – 50134 Firenze, Italy
Interests: immune response; T cells; cancer; microbiota; inflammation; infectious disease; autoimmune diseases
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Gwendolyn Barceló-Coblijn
Website
Guest Editor
Lipids in Human Pathology, Fundació Institut d'Investigació Sanitària Illes Balears (IdISBa), Research Unit - Hospital Universitari Son Espases, Carretera de Valldemossa, 79, 07120 Palma, Balearic Islands, Spain
Interests: lipidome; intestinal epithelium; extracellular vesicles; immune cells; colon cancer; inflammatory bowel diseases
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the human immune system and of the impact it has on different diseases. Two factors account for this considerable progress. First, the new technological developments, such as mass cytometry, single-cell immunogenomics, and system biology approaches, allow analyses with unprecedented resolution at the cellular level of the immune compartment. This has led to a highly dynamic situation in which new immune populations are constantly identified and described.

Second, increasing evidence is unveiling the intricate networks involved in immune recognition and tissue homeostasis. As has long been known and then confirmed, the immune system comprises an extraordinary diversity of cell types acting together to accomplish their complex biological functions. Indeed, the immune response plays a critical role in pathological situations, such as cancer, chronic inflammation, autoimmunity, and diseases associated with metabolic imbalance (diabetes, obesity) and neurological (neurodegenerative or mood) disorders, where tissue homeostasis is highly compromised. Hence, no doubt, the characterization of the immune compartment will be of great relevance for patient stratification and prognosis. Therefore, all the information gathered in this context will be critical for leading novel immunotherapies closer to daily clinical practice and personalized therapies.

This Special Issue aims to highlight the research and strategies currently used to redefine the cellular diversity within the immune system. It also welcomes all those studies seeking not only to elucidate how the immune system participates in tissue homeostasis and disease but also to improve the current immune-based scores tools for prognosis and patient stratification, which will eventually help to outline novel strategies to address personalized treatments.

Prof. Dr. Amedeo Amedei
Dr. Gwendolyn Barceló-Coblijng
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Immunity
  • Immune cells
  • Immune Response
  • Immunotherapy
  • Immunoscore

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
A Strategy for Personalized Treatment of iPS-Retinal Immune Rejections Assessed in Cynomolgus Monkey Models
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(9), 3077; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21093077 - 27 Apr 2020
Abstract
Recently, we successfully transplanted an autograft, or major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-matched allografts, from induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (iPSC-RPE) cells in patients with age-related macular degeneration. However, there was an issue regarding immune rejection after transplantation. In this study, we established a preoperational in [...] Read more.
Recently, we successfully transplanted an autograft, or major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-matched allografts, from induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (iPSC-RPE) cells in patients with age-related macular degeneration. However, there was an issue regarding immune rejection after transplantation. In this study, we established a preoperational in vitro “drug–lymphocytes–grafts immune reaction (Drug-LGIR)” test to determine the medication for immune rejection using host immunocompetent cells (lymphocytes) and transplant cells (target iPSC-RPE cells) together with different medications. The adequacy of the test was assessed by in vivo transplantation in monkey models together with medication based on in vitro data. In the results of Drug-LGIR tests, some drugs exhibited significant suppression of RPE cell-related allogeneic reactions, while other drugs did not, and the efficacy of each drug differed among the recipient monkeys. Based on the results of Drug-LGIR, we applied cyclosporine A or local steroid (triamcinolone) therapy to two monkeys, and successfully suppressed RPE-related immune rejections with RPE grafts, which survived without any signs of rejection under drug administration. We propose that our new preoperational in vitro Drug-LGIR test, which specifies the most efficacious medication for each recipient, is useful for controlling immune attacks with personalized treatment for each patient after retinal transplantation. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Immune Landscape in Tumor Microenvironment: Implications for Biomarker Development and Immunotherapy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(15), 5521; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21155521 - 01 Aug 2020
Abstract
Integration of the tumor microenvironment as a fundamental part of the tumorigenic process has undoubtedly revolutionized our understanding of cancer biology. Increasing evidence indicates that neoplastic cells establish a dependency relationship with normal resident cells in the affected tissue and, furthermore, develop the [...] Read more.
Integration of the tumor microenvironment as a fundamental part of the tumorigenic process has undoubtedly revolutionized our understanding of cancer biology. Increasing evidence indicates that neoplastic cells establish a dependency relationship with normal resident cells in the affected tissue and, furthermore, develop the ability to recruit new accessory cells that aid tumor development. In addition to normal stromal and tumor cells, this tumor ecosystem includes an infiltrated immune component that establishes complex interactions that have a critical effect during the natural history of the tumor. The process by which immune cells modulate tumor progression is known as immunoediting, a dynamic process that creates a selective pressure that finally leads to the generation of immune-resistant cells and the inability of the immune system to eradicate the tumor. In this context, the cellular and functional characterization of the immune compartment within the tumor microenvironment will help to understand tumor progression and, ultimately, will serve to create novel prognostic tools and improve patient stratification for cancer treatment. Here we review the impact of the immune system on tumor development, focusing particularly on its clinical implications and the current technologies used to analyze immune cell diversity within the tumor. Full article
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