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Exclusive Contributions by the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of the Organic Chemistry Section of Molecules

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Organic Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 753

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Department of Chemistry, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA
Interests: organic synthesis; heterocyclic chemistry; fluorescent probes; NIR contrast agents; metal sensors; microwave synthesis; biomedical applications; bioanalytical applications
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Molecules is dedicated to recent advances in organic chemistry and mainly comprises a selection of exclusive papers by the Editorial Board Members (EBMs) of the Organic Chemistry Section.

While contributions from other authors will also be considered, this Special Issue focuses primarily on highlighting recent, interesting investigations conducted by our Section’s EBMs, providing an attractive open access publishing platform for organic chemistry research data.

Dr. Maged Henary
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • organic compounds
  • organic synthesis
  • organic reaction
  • click chemistry
  • organocatalysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 6715 KiB  
Article
A [3+3] Aldol-SNAr-Dehydration Approach to 2-Naphthol and 7-Hydroxyquinoline Derivatives
by Kwabena Fobi, Ebenezer Ametsetor and Richard A. Bunce
Molecules 2024, 29(14), 3406; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules29143406 - 20 Jul 2024
Viewed by 239
Abstract
A one-pot [3+3] aldol-SNAr-dehydration annulation sequence was utilized to fuse hindered phenols onto aromatic substrates. The transformation joins doubly activated 1,3-disubstituted acetone derivatives (dinucleophiles) with C5-activated 2-fluorobenzaldehyde SNAr acceptors (dielectrophiles) in the presence of K2CO3 in [...] Read more.
A one-pot [3+3] aldol-SNAr-dehydration annulation sequence was utilized to fuse hindered phenols onto aromatic substrates. The transformation joins doubly activated 1,3-disubstituted acetone derivatives (dinucleophiles) with C5-activated 2-fluorobenzaldehyde SNAr acceptors (dielectrophiles) in the presence of K2CO3 in DMF at 65–70 °C to form polysubstituted 2-naphthols and 7-hydroxyquinolines. The reaction is regioselective in adding the most stable anionic center to the aldehyde followed by SNAr closure of the less stabilized anion to the electron-deficient aromatic ring. Twenty-seven examples are reported, and a probable mechanism is presented. In two cases where SNAr activation on the acceptor ring was lower (a C5 trifluoromethyl group on the aromatic ring or a 2-fluoropyridine), diethyl 1,3-acetonedicarboxylate initiated an interesting Grob-type fragmentation to give cinnamate esters as the products. Full article
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14 pages, 1436 KiB  
Article
Enzymatic Desymmetrisation of Prochiral meso-1,2-Disubstituted-1,2-Diaminoethane for the Synthesis of Key Enantioenriched (−)-Nutlin-3 Precursor
by Virginia Cristofori, Davide Illuminati, Chiara Bisquoli, Martina Catani, Greta Compagnin, Giulia Turrin, Claudio Trapella and Anna Fantinati
Molecules 2024, 29(14), 3267; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules29143267 - 10 Jul 2024
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Abstract
Herein we present the biocatalysed preparation of a mono-N-carbamate-protected precursor of antitumoral Nutlin-3a through enantioselective alkoxycarbonylation of meso-1,2-disubstituted-1,2-diaminoethane using enzyme lipases and dialkyl carbonates as acylating agents. A series of supported or free lipase enzymes were screened in combination with [...] Read more.
Herein we present the biocatalysed preparation of a mono-N-carbamate-protected precursor of antitumoral Nutlin-3a through enantioselective alkoxycarbonylation of meso-1,2-disubstituted-1,2-diaminoethane using enzyme lipases and dialkyl carbonates as acylating agents. A series of supported or free lipase enzymes were screened in combination with commercially available diallyl, diethyl and dimethyl carbonates. The reactions were conducted at different temperatures, for different reaction times and with variable co-solvent systems to evaluate the effects on the enzyme catalytic activity. The best results in terms of conversion, enantiomeric excess and yield were obtained when lipase from Candida antarctica B (CAL-B) was used with diallyl carbonate (DAC) when conducting the reaction solventless at 75 °C. Full article
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