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Special Issue "Aggregation-Induced Emission: Materials and Applications"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Photochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Dr. F. Christopher Pigge
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA
Interests: supramolecular chemistry; bioorganic chemistry; bioimaging; organometallic chemistry; organic synthesis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aggregation-induced emission (AIE) is a term introduced by B. Z. Tang in 2001 to describe situations in which non-emissive or weakly emissive organic molecules exhibit enhanced luminescence when forced into molecular aggregation in the presence of poor solvents or in the solid state. In the intervening years the definition has been expanded to include organic luminophores that display enhanced or “turn on” emission when placed in an environment that impedes intramolecular motion—especially arene bond rotation. While traditional AIE scaffolds include hexaphenylsiloles and tetraphenylethylenes, a number of additional molecular frameworks have been identified that also demonstrate AIE properties. The luminescent features of AIE active systems differ from those observed in conventional organic fluorophores (which often experience aggregation-caused quenching), and AIE-active luminophores have been utilized in an impressive range of applications spanning materials chemistry to chemical biology operating in the solution phase and the solid state. The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight recent developments in the design and construction of AIE-active systems in the broadly defined area of functional materials.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. F. Christopher Pigge
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Aggregation-induced emission
  • Fluorescence
  • Luminescence
  • Turn-on emission
  • Luminescent sensing
  • Bioimaging
  • OLED

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Dual Monitoring of Cracking and Healing in Self-healing Coatings Using Microcapsules Loaded with Two Fluorescent Dyes
Molecules 2019, 24(9), 1679; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24091679 - 30 Apr 2019
Abstract
We report the development of an extrinsic, self-healing coating system that shows no fluorescence from intact coating, yellowish fluorescence in cracked regions, and greenish fluorescence in healed regions, thus allowing separate monitoring of cracking and healing of coatings. This fluorescence-monitoring self-healing system consisted [...] Read more.
We report the development of an extrinsic, self-healing coating system that shows no fluorescence from intact coating, yellowish fluorescence in cracked regions, and greenish fluorescence in healed regions, thus allowing separate monitoring of cracking and healing of coatings. This fluorescence-monitoring self-healing system consisted of a top coating and an epoxy matrix resin containing mixed dye loaded in a single microcapsule. The dye-loaded microcapsules consisted of a poly(urea-formaldehyde) shell encapsulating a healing agent containing methacryloxypropyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (MAT-PDMS), styrene, a photo-initiator, and a mixture of two dyes: one that fluoresced only in the solid state (DCM) and a second that fluoresced dramatically in the solid than in the solution state (4-TPAE). A mixture of the healing agent, photo-initiator, and the two dyes was yellow due to fluorescence from DCM. On UV curing of this mixture, however, the color changed from yellow to green, and the fluorescence intensity increased due to fluorescence from 4-TPAE in the solid state. When a self-healing coating embedded with microcapsules containing the DCM/4-TPAE dye mixture was scratched, the damaged region exhibited a yellowish color that changed to green after healing. Thus, the self-healing system reported here allows separate monitoring of cracking and healing based on changes in fluorescence color. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aggregation-Induced Emission: Materials and Applications)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Recent Advances in Aggregation-Induced Emission Chemosensors for Anion Sensing
Molecules 2019, 24(15), 2711; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24152711 - 25 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The discovery of the aggregation-induced emission (AIE) phenomenon in the early 2000s not only has overcome persistent challenges caused by traditional aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ), but also has brought about new opportunities for the development of useful functional molecules. Through the years, AIE luminogens [...] Read more.
The discovery of the aggregation-induced emission (AIE) phenomenon in the early 2000s not only has overcome persistent challenges caused by traditional aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ), but also has brought about new opportunities for the development of useful functional molecules. Through the years, AIE luminogens (AIEgens) have been widely studied for applications in the areas of biomedical and biological sensing, chemosensing, optoelectronics, and stimuli responsive materials. Particularly in the application of chemosensing, a myriad of novel AIE-based sensors has been developed to detect different neutral molecular, cationic and anionic species, with a rapid detection time, high sensitivity and high selectivity by monitoring fluorescence changes. This review thus summarises the recent development of AIE-based chemosensors for the detection of anionic species, including halides and halide-containing anions, cyanides, and sulphur-, phosphorus- and nitrogen-containing anions, as well as a few other anionic species, such as citrate, lactate and anionic surfactants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aggregation-Induced Emission: Materials and Applications)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

  1. Authors: Shah Kwok Wei, Jian Wei Xu

Affiliation: 4 Architecture Drive, Singapore 117566, National University of Singapore, School of Design and Environment, Department of Building

2. Author: Juozas Vidas Grazulevicius

Affiliation: Department of Polymer Chemistry and Technology, Kaunas University of Technology, Lithuania

3. Author: Yuning Hong

Affiliation: School of Molecular Sciences, College of Science, Health and Engineering, La Trobe, Victoria, Australia

4. Author: Rachel Crespo-Otero

Affiliation: Theoretical/Computational Organic Chemistry, School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, United Kingdom

5. Type of the paper: Focused review

Tentative title: Recent advances in AIEgens for metal ion biosensing and bioimaging
Authors: Yanyan Huang et al.
Affiliations: Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences Abstract: This review is going to summarize the progress in the development of AIE-based molecular probes and nanomaterials for metal ion sensing and imaging in living biosystems. Advances in recent 5 years (since 2015) will be focused.

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