Special Issue "NANO KOREA 2019"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (9 August 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Junhong Min
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, South Korea
Interests: sample preparation; nanobiosensor; molecular diagnostic system; bioanalytical engineering
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Dae Joon Kang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Sungkyunkwan University, Republic of Korea
Interests: synthesis of 2D atomic crystals and their device applications; synthesis of metal oxides and their device physics; electrohydrodynamic lithography; atomic layer deposition
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Prof. Dr. Won Seok Chang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Principal Researcher, Department of Nanoprocess, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM)Professor, Department of Nanomechatronics, Korea University of Science and Technology (UST)
Interests: laser material processing; scanning photocurrent microscopy; 2D material; photodetector
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Wan Soo Yun
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University
Interests: nanobiosensor; nano-analysis; nanomaterials; nanomanufacturing
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Prof. Dr. Jong-Ryul Jeong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chungnam National University
Interests: nanomagnetic materials; spin caloritronics; plasmonic nanostructures; magnetoplasmonics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will publish selected papers from the 17th International Nanotech Symposium & Nano-Convergence Exhibition (NANO KOREA 2019), 2–5 July, 2019, KINTEX, Ilsan, Korea.

In particular, the symposium, which is the largest sympoisum on nanoscale science and technology in Korea, will be a meaningful occasion to confirm major research results and up-to-date research trends, increase the exchange among researchers in relevant fields, and materialize the results of research. The NANO KOREA symposium will cover the following main topics:

  • Nanoelectronics and photonics;
  • Advanced nanomaterials;
  • Nanofabrication and measurement;
  • Nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine;
  • Nanotechnology for energy;
  • Safety, standardization, and regulation in nanotechlogy;
  • Sensors and actuators;
  • Computational nanoscience and technology.

Papers attracting the most interest at the conference, or that provide novel contributions, will be selected for publication in Micromachines. These papers will be peer-reviewed for validation of research results, developments, and applications.

Prof. Dr. Junhong Min
Prof. Dr. Dae Joon Kang
Prof. Dr. Won Seok Chang
Prof. Dr. Wan Soo Yun
Prof. Dr. Jong-Ryul Jeong
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Micro/Nanofabrication
  • Nanoelectronics
  • Bionanotechnology
  • Nanomaterials
  • Computational Materials Design

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Fabrication of TiO2-Nanotube-Array-Based Supercapacitors
Micromachines 2019, 10(11), 742; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10110742 - 31 Oct 2019
Abstract
In this work, a simple and cost-effective electrochemical anodization technique was adopted to rapidly grow TiO2 nanotube arrays on a Ti current collector and to utilize the synthesized materials as potential electrodes for supercapacitors. To accelerate the growth of the TiO2 [...] Read more.
In this work, a simple and cost-effective electrochemical anodization technique was adopted to rapidly grow TiO2 nanotube arrays on a Ti current collector and to utilize the synthesized materials as potential electrodes for supercapacitors. To accelerate the growth of the TiO2 nanotube arrays, lactic acid was used as an electrolyte additive. The as-prepared TiO2 nanotube arrays with a high aspect ratio were strongly adhered to the Ti substrate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results confirmed that the TiO2 nanotube arrays were crystallized in the anatase phase. TEM images confirmed the nanotublar-like morphology of the TiO2 nanotubes, which had a tube length and a diameter of ~16 and ~80 nm, respectively. The electrochemical performance of the TiO2 nanotube array electrodes was evaluated using the cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and galvanostatic charge/discharge (GCD) measurements. Excellent electrochemical response was observed for the electrodes based on the TiO2 nanotube arrays, as the cells delivered a high specific capacitance of 5.12 mF/cm2 at a scan rate of 100 mV/s and a current density of 100 µA/cm2. The initial capacity was maintained for more than 250 cycles. Further, a remarkable rate capability response was observed, as the cell retained 88% of the initial areal capacitance when the scan rate was increased from 10 to 500 mV/s. The results suggest the suitability of TiO2 nanotube arrays as electrode materials for commercial supercapacitor applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NANO KOREA 2019)
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Open AccessArticle
Selective Growth and Contact Gap-Fill of Low Resistivity Si via Microwave Plasma-Enhanced CVD
Micromachines 2019, 10(10), 689; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10100689 - 12 Oct 2019
Abstract
Low resistivity polycrystalline Si could be selectively grown in the deep (~200 nm) and narrow patterns (~20 nm) of 20 nm pitch design rule DRAM (Dynamic Random Access Memory) by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW-CVD). We were able to achieve the high [...] Read more.
Low resistivity polycrystalline Si could be selectively grown in the deep (~200 nm) and narrow patterns (~20 nm) of 20 nm pitch design rule DRAM (Dynamic Random Access Memory) by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW-CVD). We were able to achieve the high phosphorus (CVD gap-fill in a large electrical contact area which does is affected by line pitch size) doping concentration (>2.5 × 1021 cm−3) and, thus, a low resistivity by adjusting source gas (SiH4, H2, PH3) decomposition through MW-CVD with a showerhead controlling the decomposition of source gases by using two different gas injection paths. In this study, a selective growth mechanism was applied by using the deposition/etch cyclic process to achieve the bottom–up process in the L-shaped contact, using H2 plasma that simultaneously promoted the deposition and the etch processes. Additionally, the cyclic selective growth technique was set up by controlling the SiH4 flow rate. The bottom-up process resulted in a uniform doping distribution, as well as an excellent filling capacity without seam and center void formation. Thus, low contact resistivity and higher transistor on-current could be achieved at a high and uniform phosphorus (P)-concentration. Compared to the conventional thermal, this method is expected to be a strong candidate for the complicated deep and narrow contact process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NANO KOREA 2019)
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Open AccessArticle
Electrical Coupling and Simulation of Monolithic 3D Logic Circuits and Static Random Access Memory
Micromachines 2019, 10(10), 637; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10100637 - 23 Sep 2019
Abstract
In order to simulate a circuit by applying various logic circuits and full chip using the HSPICE model, which can consider electrical coupling proposed in the previous research, it is investigated whether additional electrical coupling other than electrical coupling by top and bottom [...] Read more.
In order to simulate a circuit by applying various logic circuits and full chip using the HSPICE model, which can consider electrical coupling proposed in the previous research, it is investigated whether additional electrical coupling other than electrical coupling by top and bottom layer exists. Additional electrical coupling were verified through device simulation and confirmed to be blocked by heavily doped source/drain. Comparing the HSPICE circuit simulation results using the newly proposed monolithic 3D NAND (M3DNAND) structure in the technology computer-aided design (TCAD) mixed-mode and monolithic 3D inverter (M3DINV) unit cell model was once more verified. It is possible to simulate various logic circuits using the previously proposed M3DINV unit cell model. We simulated the operation and performances of M3DNAND, M3DNOR, 2 × 1 multiplexer (MUX), D flip-flop (D-FF), and static random access memry (SRAM). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NANO KOREA 2019)
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Open AccessArticle
Thermomagnetic Convection of Ferrofluid in an Enclosure Channel with an Internal Magnetic Field
Micromachines 2019, 10(9), 553; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10090553 - 21 Aug 2019
Abstract
Ferrofluid is a colloidal liquid in which magnetic nanoparticles such as Fe3O4 are dispersed in a nonconductive solution, and the average diameter of the nanoparticles is 10 nm. When a magnetic field is applied, the ferrofluid generates magnetization, which changes [...] Read more.
Ferrofluid is a colloidal liquid in which magnetic nanoparticles such as Fe3O4 are dispersed in a nonconductive solution, and the average diameter of the nanoparticles is 10 nm. When a magnetic field is applied, the ferrofluid generates magnetization, which changes the physical properties of the fluid itself. In this study, characteristics of the thermomagnetic convection of ferrofluid (Fe3O4) by the permanent magnet in the enclosure channel were studied. To effectively mix the ferrofluid (Fe3O4) and disturb the boundary layer, the heat dissipation of the heat source depending on the strength of the magnetic field and the shape of the enclosure channel was numerically studied. In particular, four different enclosure channels were considered: Square, separated square, circle, and separated circle. The hot temperature was set at the center of the enclosure channel. The ferrofluid was affected by the permanent magnet in the center of the channel. The magnetic field strength in the region close to the permanent magnet was enhanced. The magnetophoretic (MAP) force increased with increasing magnetic field strength. The MAP force generated a vortex in the enclosure channel, disturbing the thermal boundary. The vortex occurs differently, depending on the shape of the enclosure channel and affects the thermomagnetic convection. The temperature and velocity fields for thermomagnetic convection were described and the convective heat flux was calculated and compared. Results show that when the magnetic field strength was 4000 kA/m and the shape of the enclosure channel was a circle, the maximum convective heat flux of 4.86 × 105 W/m2 was obtained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NANO KOREA 2019)
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