Special Issue "Frontiers in Ultra-Precision Machining"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "D:Materials and Processing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jiang Guo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Mechanical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China
Interests: precision/ultraprecision machining; grinding/polishing; neutron optics; surface integrity; precision measurement
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Chunjin Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Ultra-precision Machining Technology, Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISE), The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU), Hong Kong 999077, China
Interests: ultra-precision machining; polishing/finishing; abrasive machining technology
Dr. Chengwei Kang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center of Micro/Nano Manufacturing Technology, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland
Interests: micro/nano manufacturing; precision machining; bioimplants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ultra-precision machining is a multi-disciplinary research area that is an important branch of manufacturing technology. It targets achieving ultra-precision form or surface roughness accuracy, forming the backbone and support of today’s innovative technology industries in aerospace, semiconductors, optics, telecommunications, energy, etc. The increasing demand for components with ultra-precision accuracy has stimulated the development of ultra-precision machining technology in recent decades. Accordingly, this Special Issue seeks reviews and regular research papers on the frontiers of ultra-precision machining and will serve as a platform for the communication of the latest development and innovations of ultra-precision machining technologies.

Prof. Dr. Jiang Guo
Dr. Chunjin Wang
Dr. Chengwei Kang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polishing
  • grinding
  • diamond turning
  • micro-milling
  • abrasive jet machining
  • electrical discharge machining
  • ion beam machining
  • magnetic field-assisted machining
  • ultrasonic field-assisted machining
  • laser machining

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
High-Accuracy Surface Topography Manufacturing for Continuous Phase Plates Using an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet
Micromachines 2021, 12(6), 683; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12060683 - 10 Jun 2021
Viewed by 349
Abstract
The continuous phase plate (CPP) is the vital diffractive optical element involved in laser beam shaping and smoothing in high-power laser systems. The high gradients, small spatial periods, and complex features make it difficult to achieve high accuracy when manufacturing such systems. A [...] Read more.
The continuous phase plate (CPP) is the vital diffractive optical element involved in laser beam shaping and smoothing in high-power laser systems. The high gradients, small spatial periods, and complex features make it difficult to achieve high accuracy when manufacturing such systems. A high-accuracy and high-efficiency surface topography manufacturing method for CPP is presented in this paper. The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) system is presented and the removal characteristics are studied to obtain the optimal processing parameters. An optimized iterative algorithm based on the dwell point matrix and a fast Fourier transform (FFT) is proposed to improve the accuracy and efficiency in the dwell time calculation process. A 120 mm × 120 mm CPP surface topography with a 1326.2 nm peak-to-valley (PV) value is fabricated with four iteration steps after approximately 1.6 h of plasma processing. The residual figure error between the prescribed surface topography and plasma-processed surface topography is 28.08 nm root mean square (RMS). The far-field distribution characteristic of the plasma-fabricated surface is analyzed, for which the energy radius deviation is 11 μm at 90% encircled energy. The experimental results demonstrates the potential of the APPJ approach for the manufacturing of complex surface topographies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Ultra-Precision Machining)
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Article
An Elementary Approximation of Dwell Time Algorithm for Ultra-Precision Computer-Controlled Optical Surfacing
Micromachines 2021, 12(5), 471; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12050471 - 21 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 281
Abstract
The dwell time algorithm is one of the key technologies that determines the accuracy of a workpiece in the field of ultra-precision computer-controlled optical surfacing. Existing algorithms mainly consider meticulous mathematics theory and high convergence rates, making the computation process more uneven, and [...] Read more.
The dwell time algorithm is one of the key technologies that determines the accuracy of a workpiece in the field of ultra-precision computer-controlled optical surfacing. Existing algorithms mainly consider meticulous mathematics theory and high convergence rates, making the computation process more uneven, and the flatness cannot be further improved. In this paper, a reasonable elementary approximation algorithm of dwell time is proposed on the basis of the theoretical requirement of a removal function in the subaperture polishing and single-peak rotational symmetry character of its practical distribution. Then, the algorithm is well discussed with theoretical analysis and numerical simulation in cases of one-dimension and two-dimensions. In contrast to conventional dwell time algorithms, this proposed algorithm transforms superposition and coupling features of the deconvolution problem into an elementary approximation issue of function value. Compared with the conventional methods, it has obvious advantages for improving calculation efficiency and flatness, and is of great significance for the efficient computation of large-aperture optical polishing. The flatness of φ150 mm and φ100 mm workpieces have achieved PVr150 = 0.028 λ and PVcr100 = 0.014 λ respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Ultra-Precision Machining)
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Article
A New Method for Precision Measurement of Wall-Thickness of Thin-Walled Spherical Shell Parts
Micromachines 2021, 12(5), 467; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12050467 - 21 Apr 2021
Viewed by 293
Abstract
Thin-walled parts are widely used in shock wave and detonation physics experiments, which require high surface accuracy and equal thickness. In order to obtain the wall thickness of thin-walled spherical shell parts accurately, a new measurement method is proposed. The trajectories, including meridian [...] Read more.
Thin-walled parts are widely used in shock wave and detonation physics experiments, which require high surface accuracy and equal thickness. In order to obtain the wall thickness of thin-walled spherical shell parts accurately, a new measurement method is proposed. The trajectories, including meridian and concentric trajectories, are employed to measure the thickness of thin-walled spherical shell parts. The measurement data of the inner and outer surfaces are unified in the same coordinate system, and the thickness is obtained based on a reconstruction model. The meridian and concentric circles’ trajectories are used for measuring a spherical shell with an outer diameter of Φ210.6 mm and an inner diameter of Φ206.4 mm. Without the data in the top area, the surface errors of the outer and inner surfaces are about 5 μm and 6 μm, respectively, and the wall-thickness error is about 8 μm with the meridian trajectory. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Ultra-Precision Machining)
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Article
The Influence of Crystal Orientation on Subsurface Damage of Mono-Crystalline Silicon by Bound-Abrasive Grinding
Micromachines 2021, 12(4), 365; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12040365 - 28 Mar 2021
Viewed by 456
Abstract
Subsurface damage (SSD) produced in a grinding process will affect the performance and operational duration of single-crystal silicon. In order to reduce the subsurface damage depth generated during the grinding process by adjusting the process parameters (added), experiments were designed to investigate the [...] Read more.
Subsurface damage (SSD) produced in a grinding process will affect the performance and operational duration of single-crystal silicon. In order to reduce the subsurface damage depth generated during the grinding process by adjusting the process parameters (added), experiments were designed to investigate the influence of machining factors on SSD. This included crystal orientation, diamond grit size in the grinding wheel, peripheral speed of the grinding wheel, and feeding with the intention to optimize the parameters affecting SSD. Compared with isotropic materials such as glass, we considered the impact of grinding along different crystal directions <100> and <110> on subsurface damage depth (added). The Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) spot technique was used to detect the depth of SSD. The results showed that the depth of SSD in silicon increased with the size of diamond grit. SSD can be reduced by either increasing the peripheral speed of the grinding wheel or decreasing the feeding rate of the grinding wheel in the <100> crystal orientation, if the same size of diamond grit was employed. In addition, we proposed a modified model around surface roughness and subsurface crack depth, which considered plastic and brittle deformation mechanisms and material properties of different crystal orientations. When the surface roughness (RZ) exceeded the brittle-plastic transition’s critical value RZC (RZC<100> > 1.5 μm, RZC<110> > 0.8 μm), cracks appeared on the subsurface. The experimental results were consistent with the predicted model, which could be used to predict the subsurface cracks by measuring the surface roughness. However, the model only gives the approximate range of subsurface defects, such as dislocations. The morphology and precise depth of plastic deformation subsurface defects, such as dislocations generated in the fine grinding stage, needed to be inspected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which were further studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Ultra-Precision Machining)
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Article
Rapid and Non-Destructive Repair of Fused Silica with Cluster Damage by Magnetorheological Removing Method
Micromachines 2021, 12(3), 274; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12030274 - 06 Mar 2021
Viewed by 392
Abstract
The damage repair of fused silica based on the CO2 laser repair technique has been successfully applied in high-power laser systems in the controllable nuclear fusion field. However, this kind of repairing technique mainly focuses on large-scale laser damage with sizes larger [...] Read more.
The damage repair of fused silica based on the CO2 laser repair technique has been successfully applied in high-power laser systems in the controllable nuclear fusion field. However, this kind of repairing technique mainly focuses on large-scale laser damage with sizes larger than 200 μm, but ignores the influence of cluster small-scale damage with sizes smaller than 50 μm. In order to inhibit the growth of small-scale damage and further improve the effect of fused silica damage repair, this paper carried out a study on the repair of fused silica damage using the magnetorheological (MR) removing method. The feasibility of fused silica damage repairing was verified, and the evolution law of the number, morphology, and the surface roughness of small-scale damage were all analyzed. The results showed that the MR removing method was non-destructive compared to traditional repairing technologies. It not only effectively improved the whole damage repairing rate to more than 90%, but it also restored the optical properties and surface roughness of the damaged components in the repairing process. Based on the study of the MR removing repair law, a combined repairing process of 4 μm MR removal and 700 nm computer controlled optical surfacing (CCOS) removal is proposed. A typical fused silica element was experimentally repaired to verify the process parameters. The repairing rate of small-scale damage was up to 90.4%, and the surface roughness was restored to the level before repairing. The experimental results validate the effectiveness and feasibility of the combined repairing process. This work provides an effective method for the small-scale damage repairing of fused silica components. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Ultra-Precision Machining)
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