Miniature Ultrasonic Devices and Their Applications

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "E:Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 March 2022) | Viewed by 22308

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Engineering and Technology, School of Engineering, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 3AF, UK
Interests: piezoelectric transducers & sensors; MEMS; microfluidic devices; piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers; acoustic tweezers; ultrasound imaging; micro-/nano-fabrication
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Guest Editor
James Watt School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK
Interests: materials for energy conversion and energy storage; smart sensor and actuator technology; ultrasonic transducer technology (miniature multi-modality catheters, transparent ultrasonic transducers, etc.); power ultrasonics; battery health monitoring; energy harvesting; non-destructive evaluation by ultrasound; ultrasound for biomedical applications
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Science and Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN, UK
Interests: vibration analysis; material forming; dynamic modelling and simulation and high power ultrasonics; incorporating tissue-mimicking phantom fabrication and characterization; 3D reconstruction of human anatomy and simulation; medical ultrasound and photonics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advances in microengineering and nanotechnology have allowed for the successful development of miniature ultrasonic devices with many advantages such as a low profile, high resolution, low power consumption, high element density, integrated circuits (ICs) integration compatibility, and batch production. This Special Issue aims to bring together recent research and developments concerning miniature ultrasonic devices and their applications, including underwater sonar, non-destructive testing (NDT), structure health monitoring, medical imaging and therapy, biological sensing and microscopy, targeted drug delivery, acoustic tweezing, wireless power transfer, energy harvesting, etc. Research and review articles addressing the current state of this research field are sought, including, but not limited to, research in novel device design, modelling, and simulation; fabrication techniques and process development; device implementation and integration; device characterization; and application demonstrations.

Dr. Yongqiang Qiu
Prof. Dr. Koko Kwok-Ho Lam
Prof. Zhihong Huang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ultrasonic transducers and sensors
  • MEMS and NEMS
  • CMUTs and pMUTs
  • micro/nano-fabrication
  • ultrasound imaging
  • ultrasound therapy
  • acoustic microscopy
  • acoustic tweezing
  • NDT and structure health monitoring
  • power ultrasonics
  • wireless power transfer
  • piezoelectric energy harvesting
  • ultrasound haptics

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 44518 KiB  
Article
Efficacy Estimation of Microbubble-Assisted Local Sonothrombolysis Using a Catheter with a Series of Miniature Transducers
by Peiyang Li, Wenchang Huang, Jie Xu, Weiwei Shao and Yaoyao Cui
Micromachines 2021, 12(6), 612; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12060612 - 26 May 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2114
Abstract
Intravascular ultrasound has good prospects for clinical applications in sonothrombolysis. The catheter-based side-looking intravascular ultrasound thrombolysis (e.g., Ekosonic catheters) used in clinical studies has a high frequency (2 MHz). The lower-frequency ultrasound requires a larger-diameter transducer. In our study, we designed and manufactured [...] Read more.
Intravascular ultrasound has good prospects for clinical applications in sonothrombolysis. The catheter-based side-looking intravascular ultrasound thrombolysis (e.g., Ekosonic catheters) used in clinical studies has a high frequency (2 MHz). The lower-frequency ultrasound requires a larger-diameter transducer. In our study, we designed and manufactured a small ultrasound-based prototype catheter that can emit a lower frequency ultrasound (1.1 MHz). In order to evaluate the safety and efficacy of local low-frequency ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis, a microbubble (MB) was introduced to augment thrombolysis effect of locally delivered low-intensity ultrasound. The results demonstrated that combination of ultrasound and MB realized higher clot lysis than urokinase-only treatment (17.0% ± 1.2% vs. 14.9% ± 2.7%) under optimal ultrasound settings of 1.1 MHz, 0.414 MPa, 4.89 W/cm2, 5% duty cycle and MB concentration of 60 μg/mL. When urokinase was added, the fibrinolysis accelerated by MB and ultrasound resulted in a further increased thrombolysis rate that was more than two times than that of urokinase alone (36.7% ± 5.5% vs. 14.9% ± 2.7%). However, a great quantity of ultrasound energy was required to achieve substantial clot lysis without MB, leading to the situation that temperature accumulated inside the clot became harmful. We suggest that MB-assisted local sonothrombolysis be considered as adjuvant therapy of thrombolytic agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Miniature Ultrasonic Devices and Their Applications)
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Review

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28 pages, 8840 KiB  
Review
Ultrasound-Mediated Ocular Drug Delivery: From Physics and Instrumentation to Future Directions
by Blair Duncan, Raida Al-Kassas, Guangming Zhang, Dave Hughes and Yongqiang Qiu
Micromachines 2023, 14(8), 1575; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi14081575 - 9 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1283
Abstract
Drug delivery to the anterior and posterior segments of the eye is impeded by anatomical and physiological barriers. Increasingly, the bioeffects produced by ultrasound are being proven effective for mitigating the impact of these barriers on ocular drug delivery, though there does not [...] Read more.
Drug delivery to the anterior and posterior segments of the eye is impeded by anatomical and physiological barriers. Increasingly, the bioeffects produced by ultrasound are being proven effective for mitigating the impact of these barriers on ocular drug delivery, though there does not appear to be a consensus on the most appropriate system configuration and operating parameters for this application. In this review, the fundamental aspects of ultrasound physics most pertinent to drug delivery are presented; the primary phenomena responsible for increased drug delivery efficacy under ultrasound sonication are discussed; an overview of common ocular drug administration routes and the associated ocular barriers is also given before reviewing the current state of the art of ultrasound-mediated ocular drug delivery and its potential future directions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Miniature Ultrasonic Devices and Their Applications)
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33 pages, 5938 KiB  
Review
Review of Ultrasonic Ranging Methods and Their Current Challenges
by Zurong Qiu, Yaohuan Lu and Zhen Qiu
Micromachines 2022, 13(4), 520; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi13040520 - 26 Mar 2022
Cited by 32 | Viewed by 6596
Abstract
Ultrasonic ranging has been widely used in automobiles, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), robots and other fields. With the appearance of micromachined ultrasonic transducers (MUTs), the application of ultrasonic ranging technology presents a more extensive trend. This review focuses on ultrasonic ranging technology and [...] Read more.
Ultrasonic ranging has been widely used in automobiles, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), robots and other fields. With the appearance of micromachined ultrasonic transducers (MUTs), the application of ultrasonic ranging technology presents a more extensive trend. This review focuses on ultrasonic ranging technology and its development history and future trend. Going through the state-of-the-art ultrasonic ranging methods, this paper covers the principles of each method, the signal processing methodologies, the overall system performance as well as key ultrasonic transducer parameters. Moreover, the error sources and compensation methods of ultrasonic ranging systems are discussed. This review aims to give an overview of the ultrasonic ranging technology including its current development and challenges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Miniature Ultrasonic Devices and Their Applications)
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23 pages, 10444 KiB  
Review
Ultrasonic Particle Manipulation in Glass Capillaries: A Concise Review
by Guotian Liu, Junjun Lei, Feng Cheng, Kemin Li, Xuanrong Ji, Zhigang Huang and Zhongning Guo
Micromachines 2021, 12(8), 876; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12080876 - 26 Jul 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 10843
Abstract
Ultrasonic particle manipulation (UPM), a non-contact and label-free method that uses ultrasonic waves to manipulate micro- or nano-scale particles, has recently gained significant attention in the microfluidics community. Moreover, glass is optically transparent and has dimensional stability, distinct acoustic impedance to water and [...] Read more.
Ultrasonic particle manipulation (UPM), a non-contact and label-free method that uses ultrasonic waves to manipulate micro- or nano-scale particles, has recently gained significant attention in the microfluidics community. Moreover, glass is optically transparent and has dimensional stability, distinct acoustic impedance to water and a high acoustic quality factor, making it an excellent material for constructing chambers for ultrasonic resonators. Over the past several decades, glass capillaries are increasingly designed for a variety of UPMs, e.g., patterning, focusing, trapping and transporting of micron or submicron particles. Herein, we review established and emerging glass capillary-transducer devices, describing their underlying mechanisms of operation, with special emphasis on the application of glass capillaries with fluid channels of various cross-sections (i.e., rectangular, square and circular) on UPM. We believe that this review will provide a superior guidance for the design of glass capillary-based UPM devices for acoustic tweezers-based research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Miniature Ultrasonic Devices and Their Applications)
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