Special Issue "Static and Dynamic Recrystallization, and Phase Transformation in Metallic Materials"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Clodualdo Aranas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Mechanical Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB E3B 5A3, Canada
Interests: thermomechanical processing; development of novel alloys; mechanical properties and deformation behavior of materials; phase transformation in metal alloys; static and dynamic materials testing; high-strain rate deformation; static and dynamic recrystallization; materials characterization; texture and anisotropy of materials; thermodynamics of materials; additive manufacturing of metallic materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The occurrence of static and dynamic recrystallization and phase transformation has been the backbone of manufacturing and metallurgical engineering in the past decade to maximize the mechanical properties of alloys during processing. Having an in-depth understanding and modelling of these complex metallurgical phenomena generated huge successes both in optimizing the properties of commercial alloys and in developing novel materials. However, despite significant progress in this area, the rise of sophisticated materials testing methods and characterization techniques has presented opportunities to further push the mechanical properties of alloys to their limit by controlling the microstructure.

This Special Issue of Metals invites experts from around the world to submit papers related to static and dynamic recrystallization and phase transformation, including transformation-induced plasticity, of various alloys such as but not limited to steels, nickel-based alloys, titanium alloys, magnesium alloys, aluminum alloys, and high-entropy alloys. Although these phenomena are common during deformation and cyclic heat treatment, papers related to other materials processing such as additive manufacturing are also welcome. This Issue is particularly interested in the microstructural analysis of alloys as well as the modelling of their behavior at room and high temperatures.

Prof. Clodualdo Aranas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Static and dynamic recrystallization
  • Static and dynamic phase transformation
  • Thermomechanical processing
  • Hot deformation
  • Transformation-induced plasticity
  • Equilibrium and non-equilibrium phases
  • Alloy development
  • Microstructural evolution
  • Materials characterization

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Study of Static Recrystallization Kinetics and the Evolution of Austenite Grain Size by Dynamic Recrystallization Refinement of an Eutectoid Steel
Metals 2019, 9(12), 1289; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9121289 - 29 Nov 2019
Abstract
Interrupted and continuous hot compression tests were performed for eutectoid steel over the temperature range of 850 to 1050 °C and while using strain rates of 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, and 1 s−1.The interrupted tests were carried out to characterize the kinetics [...] Read more.
Interrupted and continuous hot compression tests were performed for eutectoid steel over the temperature range of 850 to 1050 °C and while using strain rates of 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, and 1 s−1.The interrupted tests were carried out to characterize the kinetics of static recrystallization(SRX) and determinate the interpass time conditions that are required for initiation and propagation of dynamic recrystallization (DRX), while considering that the material does not contain microalloying elements additions for the recrystallization delay. Continuous testing was used to investigate the evolution of the austenite grain size that results from DRX. The results indicate that carbon content accelerates the SRX rate. This effect was observed when the retardation of recrystallization due to a decrease in deformation temperature from 1050 to 850 °C was only about one order of magnitude. The expected decelerate effect on the SRX rate when the initial grain size increases from 86 to 387 µm was not significant for this material. Although the strain parameter has a strong influence on SRX rate, in contrast to a lesser degree of strain rate, both of the effects are nearly independent of the chemical composition. The calculated maximum interpass times that are compatible with DRCR (Dynamic Recrystallization Controlled Rolling), for relatively low strain rates, suggest that the onset and maintaining of the DRX is possible. However, while using the empirical equations that were developed in the present work to estimate the maximum times for high strain rates, such as those observed in the wire and rod mills, indicate that the DRX start is feasible, but maintaining this mechanism for 5% softening in each pass after peak strain is not possible. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Texture Evolution and Anisotropy of Plastic Flow in Hot Compression of Extruded ZK60-T5 Magnesium Alloy Plate
Metals 2019, 9(11), 1170; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9111170 - 30 Oct 2019
Abstract
The texture evolution during hot compression of extruded ZK60A-T5 magnesium alloy plate loaded along the extrusion direction (ED) and the normal direction (ND) has been examined with the help of pole figures obtained on specimens deformed in the ranges of 200 °C to [...] Read more.
The texture evolution during hot compression of extruded ZK60A-T5 magnesium alloy plate loaded along the extrusion direction (ED) and the normal direction (ND) has been examined with the help of pole figures obtained on specimens deformed in the ranges of 200 °C to 500 °C and 0.0003 s−1 to 10 s−1. The results are interpreted in terms of the operating slip systems and mechanisms identified based on processing maps developed for the above two initial specimen orientations. The processing map for the initial ED orientation exhibited three domains. In Domains 1 and 3, first-order pyramidal slip {10 1 ¯ l} <11 2 ¯ 0> occurs, while in Domain 2, second-order pyramidal slip {11 2 ¯ 2} <11 2 ¯ 3> occurs. The pole figures obtained on specimens deformed in Domains 1 and 3 are strikingly similar, indicating that the operating slip system controls the texture evolution. Compression in Domains 1 and 3 nearly randomizes the intense basal texture in the as-received specimens, while a new texture is generated in Domain 2 with basal poles at 45° to ND or transverse direction (TD). This new texture will promote basal slip when loaded in a transverse direction. When loaded in the normal direction (ND), the processing map exhibited four domains. In Domains 1 and 4, {10 1 ¯ l} <11 2 ¯ 3> slip occurs, while {11 2 ¯ 2} <11 2 ¯ 3> slip occurs in Domains 2 and 3. The pole figures obtained from specimens deformed in Domains 1 and 4 have similar features, while those deformed in Domains 2 and 3 exhibited similar features to one another, confirming that the operating slip systems control the texture development since they are the same in each pair. The compression along ND produces strong basal textures with the basal planes normal to the ED. The texture gets intensified with increased temperature of deformation and causes strong anisotropy in mechanical properties. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Strain-Induced Ferrite Formation During Steckel Mill Simulations with Varying Roughing Pass Schedules
Metals 2019, 9(8), 814; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9080814 - 24 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
It has been previously demonstrated that austenite may undergo partial dynamic transformation (DT) during the plate rolling process. Austenite dynamically transforms into unstable ferrite during hot deformation even at very high temperatures. In this work, the plate rolling simulations, with emphasis on Steckel [...] Read more.
It has been previously demonstrated that austenite may undergo partial dynamic transformation (DT) during the plate rolling process. Austenite dynamically transforms into unstable ferrite during hot deformation even at very high temperatures. In this work, the plate rolling simulations, with emphasis on Steckel mill operations, through torsion testing under isothermal conditions were performed on an X70 steel. Four different roughing schedules were tested followed by five finishing passes with pass strains of 0.3 applied at 900 °C. The roughing schedules had zero, one, two and three roughing passes at a temperature of 1100 °C, strain of 0.4 and strain rate of 1 s−1. The stress–strain curves as well as the mean flow stress (MFS) behaviors indicated that both dynamic transformation (DT) and dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurred during straining. The critical strains for the onset of DT and DRX were determined by means of the double differentiation method and the critical strain values decreased with the number of roughing and finishing strains from the first going to the last pass. It was observed that the volume fraction of the dynamically formed ferrite increased sharply during the finishing stage as the number of previous roughing passes increased, which can be attributed to higher strain accumulation. The results presented here indicate that improved models are needed to control the microstructure of the material during subsequent cooling. Full article
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