Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystalline Metals and Alloys".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 1440

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Straße 1, 40237 Düsseldorf, Germany
2. BCAM- Basque Centre for Applied Mathematics, 48009 Bilbao, Spain
Interests: grain boundary segregation; hydrogen embrittlement; materials design; MXene
1. Department Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, 40237 Dusseldorf, Germany
2. School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China
Interests: advanced high-strength steels; phase transformation; deformation micromechanisms; damage and hydrogen embrittlement
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hydrogen embrittlement is a phenomenon where, when dissolved in metals, specifically metallic alloys reduce the mechanical strength of the material. Due to its small atomic size, hydrogen diffuses very rapidly even at normal temperatures. The absorbed hydrogen interacts with various material defects, such as vacancies; dislocations; and other microstructural features, such as grain boundaries, which leads to macroscopic failure. The formation of metallic hydrides can also lead to hydrogen-related failure in metallic alloys. Research in this direction is fundamentally important to increase resistance to hydrogen embrittlement in metals due to its applicability in engineering alloys.
This Special Issue will focus on the following topics:

  • Hydrogen embrittlement (HE).
  • Hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity mechanism (HELP).
  • Hydrogen-enhanced decohesion mechanism (HEDE).
  • Hydrogen-assisted fracture (HAF) and hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC).
  • Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE).
  • Hydrogen interaction with solutes and material defects. 
  • APT for the atomic-scale characterization of hydrogen in structural materials.
  • Causes and effects of hydride formation on crack tips.
  • Overview on the challenges and advancements in experimental techniques over the years.
  • Hydrogen interaction with microstructural features such as grain boundaries and precipitates.
  • The formation of metallic hydrides and their role in hydrogen-related failure.

Other than the mentioned topics, any articles related to hydrogen failure in metals are welcome. These research articles can be based on experimental results, simulation and statistical modeling. Submissions may include either review articles or original research work.

Dr. Poulami Chakraborty
Dr. Binhan Sun
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • hydrogen embrittlement
  • hydrogen diffusion
  • hydrogen degradation
  • metallic alloys
  • hydrogen-assisted cracking

Published Papers (3 papers)

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17 pages, 1345 KiB  
Article
Evaluating the Effect of Hydrogen on the Tensile Properties of Cold-Finished Mild Steel
by Emmanuel Sey and Zoheir N. Farhat
Crystals 2024, 14(6), 529; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst14060529 - 31 May 2024
Viewed by 282
Abstract
One of the major sources of catastrophic failures and deterioration of the mechanical properties of metals, such as ductility, toughness, and strength, in various engineering components during application is hydrogen embrittlement (HE). It occurs as a result of the adsorption, diffusion, and interaction [...] Read more.
One of the major sources of catastrophic failures and deterioration of the mechanical properties of metals, such as ductility, toughness, and strength, in various engineering components during application is hydrogen embrittlement (HE). It occurs as a result of the adsorption, diffusion, and interaction of hydrogen with various metal defects like dislocations, voids, grain boundaries, and oxide/matrix interfaces due to its small atomic size. Over the years, extensive effort has been dedicated to understanding hydrogen embrittlement sources, effects, and mechanisms. This study aimed at assessing the tensile properties, toughness, ductility, and susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of cold-finished mild steel. Steel coupons were subjected to electrochemical hydrogen charging in a carefully chosen alkaline solution over a particular time and at various charging current densities. Tensile property tests were conducted immediately after the charging process, and the results were compared with those of uncharged steel. The findings revealed a clear drop in toughness and ductility with increasing hydrogen content. Fracture surfaces were examined to determine the failure mechanisms. This evaluation has enabled the prediction of steel’s ability to withstand environments with elevated hydrogen concentrations during practical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals)
0 pages, 7195 KiB  
Article
Aging Effects in Zr(Fe0.5V0.5)2 Tritides
by Francesco Ghezzi and Walter Theodore Shmayda
Crystals 2024, 14(2), 159; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst14020159 - 1 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 709 | Correction
Abstract
We report an experimental study on the tritiding capabilities over a long period of the intermetallic compound Zr(Fe0.5V0.5)2. The study was carried out with the prospect of using the alloy as a chemical converter to reduce HTO. [...] Read more.
We report an experimental study on the tritiding capabilities over a long period of the intermetallic compound Zr(Fe0.5V0.5)2. The study was carried out with the prospect of using the alloy as a chemical converter to reduce HTO. Two identical getter beds, containing 1 gram of alloy in powder form each, were used in the experiments. While one of them was exploited to determine the tritium isotherms of the virgin alloy, the other bed was loaded at 75% of stoichiometry with 354 Ci of tritium and left to age for 1500 days. The bed was then unloaded and the isotherms of the aged alloy were determined twice to check the repeatability. The main results of the work are that, while enthalpy and entropy changes for tritium dissolution at infinite dilution are practically the same for the fresh alloy and the aged alloy, they vary significantly when the isotherms are determined on the aged alloy at a large enough distance of time (one week). This behavior is ascribed to the He3 present in the interstitial sites. However, the fact that the solubility of the alloy decreases with aging suggests that the He3 present either in the interstitial sites or in bubbles subtracts sites for dissolution. Also to be stressed is that in the tritide-forming region, these thermodynamic values decrease with aging in a monotonic way. This different behavior is tentatively explained by invoking the nature of the tritium bond. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals)
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1 pages, 162 KiB  
Correction
Correction: Ghezzi, F.; Shmayda, W.T. Aging Effects in Zr(Fe0.5V0.5)2 Tritides. Crystals 2024, 14, 159
by Francesco Ghezzi and Walter Theodore Shmayda
Crystals 2024, 14(6), 542; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst14060542 - 11 Jun 2024
Viewed by 174
Abstract
There was an error in the original publication [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals)
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