Special Issue "Processing-Structure-Property Relationships in Metals"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 March 2019)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Roberto Montanari

Universy of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +39-06-72597182
Interests: surface treatments, coatings, mechanical properties, XPS, AES, LDH
Guest Editor
Dr. Alessandra Varone

Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico, 1-00133 Rome, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: liquid metals; welding; high temperature materials; steels; sintering; electron microscopy (TEM, SEM); surface analyses (XPS, AES); X-ray diffraction; mechanical spectroscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the industrial manufacturing of metals, the achievement of products featuring desired characteristics always requires the control of process parameters in order to get a suitable microstructure. The strict relationship among process parameters, microstructure, and mechanical properties is a matter of interest in different areas, such as foundry, plastic forming, sintering, welding, etc., and regards both well-established and innovative processes.

Nowadays, circular economy and sustainable technological development are dominant paradigms and impose an optimized use of resources, a lower energetic impact of industrial processes and new tasks for materials and products. In this frame, this Special Issue covers a broad range of research works and will contain research and review papers. Particular attention is paid to novel processes and recent advancements in testing methods and computational simulations able to characterize and describe microstructural features and mechanical properties.

We do hope the Special Issue of Metals will gather manuscripts from academic and industrial researchers, will lead to fruitful international networking and cooperation, as well as stimulating new ideas and investigations.

Prof. Dr. Roberto Montanari
Dr. Alessandra Varone
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Industrial processes
  • Process parameters
  • Microstructure
  • Mechanical properties
  • Testing methods
  • Simulation

Published Papers (15 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Anelastic Behavior of Small Dimensioned Aluminum
Metals 2019, 9(5), 549; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9050549
Received: 18 March 2019 / Revised: 6 May 2019 / Accepted: 9 May 2019 / Published: 11 May 2019
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Abstract
In the present research, results are presented regarding the anelasticity of 99.999% pure aluminum thin films, either deposited on silica substrates or as free-standing sheets obtained by cold rolling. Mechanical Spectroscopy (MS) tests, namely measurements of dynamic modulus and damping vs. temperature, were [...] Read more.
In the present research, results are presented regarding the anelasticity of 99.999% pure aluminum thin films, either deposited on silica substrates or as free-standing sheets obtained by cold rolling. Mechanical Spectroscopy (MS) tests, namely measurements of dynamic modulus and damping vs. temperature, were performed using a vibrating reed analyzer under vacuum. The damping vs. temperature curves of deposited films exhibit two peaks which tend to merge into a single peak as the specimen thickness increases above 0.2 µm. The thermally activated anelastic relaxation processes observed on free-standing films are strongly dependent on film thickness, and below a critical value of about 20 µm two anelastic relaxation peaks can be observed; both their activation energy and relaxation strength are affected by film thickness. These results, together with those observed on bulk specimens, are indicative of specific dislocation and grain boundary dynamics, constrained by the critical values of the ratio of film thickness to grain size. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing-Structure-Property Relationships in Metals)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Rolling Speed on Microstructural and Microtextural Evolution of Nb Tubes during Caliber-Rolling Process
Metals 2019, 9(5), 500; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9050500
Received: 9 April 2019 / Revised: 26 April 2019 / Accepted: 27 April 2019 / Published: 29 April 2019
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Abstract
This study investigated the fabrication of Nb tubes via the caliber-rolling process at various rolling speeds from 1.4 m/min to 9.9 m/min at ambient temperature, and the effect of the caliber-rolling speed on the microstructural and microtextural evolution of the Nb tubes. The [...] Read more.
This study investigated the fabrication of Nb tubes via the caliber-rolling process at various rolling speeds from 1.4 m/min to 9.9 m/min at ambient temperature, and the effect of the caliber-rolling speed on the microstructural and microtextural evolution of the Nb tubes. The caliber-rolling process affected the grain refinement when the Nb tube had a higher fraction of low angle grain boundaries. However, the grain size was identical regardless of the rolling speed. The dislocation density of the Nb tubes increased with the caliber-rolling speed according to the Orowan equation. The reduction of intensity for the <111> fiber texture and the development of the <112> fiber texture with the increase of the strain rate are considered to have decreased the internal energy by increasing the fraction of the low-energy Σ3 boundaries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing-Structure-Property Relationships in Metals)
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Open AccessArticle
Investigation of the Temperature-Related Wear Performance of Hard Nanostructured Coatings Deposited on a S600 High Speed Steel
Metals 2019, 9(3), 332; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9030332
Received: 31 January 2019 / Revised: 5 March 2019 / Accepted: 9 March 2019 / Published: 15 March 2019
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Abstract
Thin hard coatings are widely known as key elements in many industrial fields, from equipment for metal machining to dental implants and orthopedic prosthesis. When it comes to machining and cutting tools, thin hard coatings are crucial for decreasing the coefficient of friction [...] Read more.
Thin hard coatings are widely known as key elements in many industrial fields, from equipment for metal machining to dental implants and orthopedic prosthesis. When it comes to machining and cutting tools, thin hard coatings are crucial for decreasing the coefficient of friction (COF) and for protecting tools against oxidation. The aim of this work was to evaluate the tribological performance of two commercially available thin hard coatings deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) on a high speed tool steel (S600) under extreme working conditions. For this purpose, pin-on-disc wear tests were carried out either at room temperature (293 K) or at high temperature (873 K) against alumina (Al2O3) balls. Two thin hard nitrogen-rich coatings were considered: a multilayer AlTiCrN and a superlattice (nanolayered) CrN/NbN. The surface and microstructure characterization were performed by optical profilometry, field-emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing-Structure-Property Relationships in Metals)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Wear and Cavitation Erosion Resistance of an AlMgSc Alloy Produced by DMLS
Metals 2019, 9(3), 308; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9030308
Received: 15 February 2019 / Revised: 2 March 2019 / Accepted: 4 March 2019 / Published: 8 March 2019
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Abstract
Pin-on-disk and cavitation tests were performed on an innovative Al-Mg alloy modified with Sc and Zr for additive manufacturing, which was tested in annealed condition. The damaging mechanisms were studied by observations of the morphology of the sample surface after progressive testing. These [...] Read more.
Pin-on-disk and cavitation tests were performed on an innovative Al-Mg alloy modified with Sc and Zr for additive manufacturing, which was tested in annealed condition. The damaging mechanisms were studied by observations of the morphology of the sample surface after progressive testing. These analyses allowed the identification of an adhesive wear mechanism in the first stages of pin-on-disk test, which evolved into a tribo-oxidative one due to the formation and fragmentation of an oxide layer with increasing testing distance. Regarding cavitation erosion, the AlMgSc alloy was characterized by an incubation period of approximately 1 h before mass loss was measured. Once material removal started, mass loss had a linear behavior as a function of exposure time. No preferential sites for erosion were identified, even though after some minutes of cavitation testing, the boundaries of melting pools can be seen. The comparison with literature data for AlSi10Mg alloy produced by additive manufacturing technology shows that AlMgSc alloy exhibits remarkable wear resistance, while the total mass loss after 8 h of cavitation testing is significantly higher than the value recorded for AlSi10Mg alloy in as-built condition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing-Structure-Property Relationships in Metals)
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Open AccessArticle
Metal Posts and the Effect of Material–Shape Combination on the Mechanical Behavior of Endodontically Treated Anterior Teeth
Metals 2019, 9(2), 125; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9020125
Received: 16 December 2018 / Revised: 14 January 2019 / Accepted: 22 January 2019 / Published: 24 January 2019
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Abstract
The control of the process–structure–property relationship of a material plays an important role in the design of biomedical metal devices featuring desired properties. In the field of endodontics, several post-core systems have been considered, which include a wide range of industrially developed posts. [...] Read more.
The control of the process–structure–property relationship of a material plays an important role in the design of biomedical metal devices featuring desired properties. In the field of endodontics, several post-core systems have been considered, which include a wide range of industrially developed posts. Endodontists generally use posts characterized by different materials, sizes, and shapes. Computer-aided design (CAD) and finite element (FE) analysis were taken into account to provide further insight into the effect of the material–shape combination of metal posts on the mechanical behavior of endodontically treated anterior teeth. In particular, theoretical designs of metal posts with two different shapes (conical-tapered and conical-cylindrical) and consisting of materials with Young’s moduli of 110 GPa and 200 GPa were proposed. A load of 100 N was applied on the palatal surface of the crown at 45° to the longitudinal axis of the tooth. Linear static analyses were performed with a non-failure condition. The results suggested the possibility to tailor the stress distribution along the metal posts and at the interface between the post and the surrounding structures, benefiting from an appropriate combination of a CAD-based approach and material selection. The obtained results could help to design metal posts that minimize stress concentrations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing-Structure-Property Relationships in Metals)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
AA7050 Al Alloy Hot-Forging Process for Improved Fracture Toughness Properties
Metals 2019, 9(1), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9010064
Received: 21 December 2018 / Revised: 4 January 2019 / Accepted: 8 January 2019 / Published: 11 January 2019
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Abstract
The conventional heat-treatment standard for the industrial post hot-forging cycle of AA7050 is regulated by the AMS4333 and AMS2770N standards. An innovative method that aimed to improve toughness behavior in Al alloys has been developed and reported. The unconventional method introduces an intermediate [...] Read more.
The conventional heat-treatment standard for the industrial post hot-forging cycle of AA7050 is regulated by the AMS4333 and AMS2770N standards. An innovative method that aimed to improve toughness behavior in Al alloys has been developed and reported. The unconventional method introduces an intermediate warm working step between the solution treating and the final ageing treatment for the high resistance aluminum alloy AA7050. The results showed several benefits starting from the grain refinement to a more stable fracture toughness KIC behavior (with an appreciable higher value) without tensile property loss. A microstructural and precipitation state characterization provided elements for the initial understanding of these improvements in the macro-properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing-Structure-Property Relationships in Metals)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Al 6061 Alloy Compositions on Mechanical Properties of the Automotive Steering Knuckle Made by Novel Casting Process
Metals 2018, 8(10), 857; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8100857
Received: 1 October 2018 / Revised: 15 October 2018 / Accepted: 17 October 2018 / Published: 20 October 2018
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Abstract
This study demonstrates the feasibility of a novel casting process called tailored additive casting (TAC). The TAC process involves injecting the melt several times to fabricate a single component, with a few seconds of holding between successive injections. Using TAC, we can successfully [...] Read more.
This study demonstrates the feasibility of a novel casting process called tailored additive casting (TAC). The TAC process involves injecting the melt several times to fabricate a single component, with a few seconds of holding between successive injections. Using TAC, we can successfully produce commercial-grade automotive steering knuckles with a tensile strength of 383 ± 3 MPa and an elongation percentage of 10.7 ± 1.1%, from Al 6061 alloys. To produce steering knuckles with sufficient mechanical strength, the composition of an Al 6061 alloy is optimized with the addition of Zr, Zn, and Cu as minor elements. These minor elements influence the thermal properties of the melt and alloy, such as their thermal stress, strain rate, shrinkage volume, and porosity. Optimal conditions for heat treatment before and after forging further improve the mechanical strength of the steering knuckles produced by TAC followed by forging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing-Structure-Property Relationships in Metals)
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Open AccessArticle
A Tool for Predicting the Effect of the Plunger Motion Profile on the Static Properties of Aluminium High Pressure Die Cast Components
Metals 2018, 8(10), 798; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8100798
Received: 1 September 2018 / Revised: 29 September 2018 / Accepted: 30 September 2018 / Published: 5 October 2018
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Abstract
The availability of tools for predicting quality in high pressure die casting is a challenging issue since a large amount of defects is detected in components with a consequent worsening of the mechanical behavior. In this paper, a tool for predicting the effect [...] Read more.
The availability of tools for predicting quality in high pressure die casting is a challenging issue since a large amount of defects is detected in components with a consequent worsening of the mechanical behavior. In this paper, a tool for predicting the effect of the plunger motion on the properties of high pressure die cast aluminum alloys is explained and applied, by demonstrating its effectiveness. A comparison between two experiments executed through different cold chamber machines and the same geometry of the die and slightly different chemical compositions of the alloy is described. The effectiveness of the model is proved by showing the agreement between the prediction bounds and the measured data. The prediction model proposed is a general methodology independent of the machine and accounts for the effects of geometry and alloy through its coefficients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing-Structure-Property Relationships in Metals)
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Open AccessArticle
Multimodal Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AZ91 Mg Alloy Prepared by Equal Channel Angular Pressing plus Aging
Metals 2018, 8(10), 763; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8100763
Received: 7 September 2018 / Revised: 22 September 2018 / Accepted: 25 September 2018 / Published: 26 September 2018
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Abstract
Developing cost-effective magnesium alloys with high strength and good ductility is a long-standing challenge for lightweight metals. Here we present a multimodal grain structured AZ91 Mg alloy with both high strength and good ductility, prepared through a combined processing route of low-pass ECAP [...] Read more.
Developing cost-effective magnesium alloys with high strength and good ductility is a long-standing challenge for lightweight metals. Here we present a multimodal grain structured AZ91 Mg alloy with both high strength and good ductility, prepared through a combined processing route of low-pass ECAP with short-time aging. This multimodal grain structure consisted of coarse grains and fine grains modified by heterogeneous precipitates, which resulted from incomplete dynamic recrystallization. This novel microstructure manifested in both superior high strength (tensile strength of 360 MPa) and good ductility (elongation of 21.2%). The high strength was mainly attributed to the synergistic effect of grain refinement, back-stress strengthening, and precipitation strengthening. The favorable ductility, meanwhile, was ascribed to the grain refinement and multimodal grain structure. We believe that our microstructure control strategy could be applicable to magnesium alloys which exhibit obvious precipitation strengthening potential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing-Structure-Property Relationships in Metals)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparative Study of Two Aging Treatments on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of an Ultra-Fine Grained Mg-10Y-6Gd-1.5Zn-0.5Zr Alloy
Metals 2018, 8(9), 658; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8090658
Received: 29 July 2018 / Revised: 21 August 2018 / Accepted: 21 August 2018 / Published: 23 August 2018
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Abstract
Developing high strength and high ductility magnesium alloys is an important issue for weight-reduction applications. In this work, we explored the feasibility of manipulating nanosized precipitates on LPSO-contained (long period stacking ordered phase) ultra-fine grained (UFG) magnesium alloy to obtain simultaneously improved strength [...] Read more.
Developing high strength and high ductility magnesium alloys is an important issue for weight-reduction applications. In this work, we explored the feasibility of manipulating nanosized precipitates on LPSO-contained (long period stacking ordered phase) ultra-fine grained (UFG) magnesium alloy to obtain simultaneously improved strength and ductility. The effect of two aging treatments on microstructures and mechanical properties of an UFG Mg-10Y-6Gd-1.5Zn-0.5Zr alloy was systematically investigated and compared by a series of microstructure characterization techniques and tensile test. The results showed that nano γ’’ precipitates were successfully introduced in T5 peak aged alloy with no obvious increase in grain size. While T6 peak aging treatment stimulated the growth of α-Mg grains to 4.3 μm (fine grained, FG), together with the precipitation of γ’’ precipitates. Tensile tests revealed that both aging treatments remarkably improved the strengths but impaired the ductility slightly. The T5 peak aged alloy exhibited the optimum mechanical properties with ultimate strength of 431 MPa and elongation of 13.5%. This work provided a novel strategy to simultaneously improve the strength and ductility of magnesium alloys by integrating the intense precipitation strengthening with ductile LPSO-contained UFG/FG microstructure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing-Structure-Property Relationships in Metals)
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Open AccessArticle
Microstructure and Texture Inhomogeneity after Large Non-Monotonic Simple Shear Strains: Achievements of Tensile Properties
Metals 2018, 8(8), 583; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8080583
Received: 19 June 2018 / Revised: 3 July 2018 / Accepted: 6 July 2018 / Published: 26 July 2018
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Abstract
In this study, for the first time, the effect of large non-monotonic simple shear strains on the uniformity of the tensile properties of pure Cu specimens was studied and justified by means of microstructural and textural investigations. A process called simple shear extrusion, [...] Read more.
In this study, for the first time, the effect of large non-monotonic simple shear strains on the uniformity of the tensile properties of pure Cu specimens was studied and justified by means of microstructural and textural investigations. A process called simple shear extrusion, which consists of two forward and two reversed simple shear straining stages on two different slip planes, was designed in order to impose non-monotonic simple shear strains. Although the mechanism of grain refinement is continuous dynamic recrystallization, an exceptional microstructural behavior and texture were observed due to the complicated straining path results from two different slip planes and two pairs of shear directions on two different axes in a cycle of the process. The geometry of the process imposes a distribution of strain results in the inhomogeneous microstructure and texture throughout the plane perpendicular to the slip plane. Although it is expected that the yield strength in the periphery reaches that of the center by retardation, it never reaches that value, which results in the different deformation modes of the center and the periphery. The occurrence of shear reversal in each quarter of a cycle results in the elimination of some of the boundaries, an increase in the cell wall thickness, and a decrease in the Taylor factor. Change in the shear plane in each half of a cycle leads to the formation of cell boundaries in a different alignment. Since the direction of the shear and/or the shear plane change frequently in a cycle, the texture of a sample after multi-cycles of the process more closely resembles a random orientation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing-Structure-Property Relationships in Metals)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Rolling Reduction on Microstructure and Property of Ultrafine Grained Low-Carbon Steel Processed by Cryorolling Martensite
Metals 2018, 8(7), 518; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8070518
Received: 19 June 2018 / Revised: 3 July 2018 / Accepted: 3 July 2018 / Published: 5 July 2018
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Abstract
A novel method of cryorolling martensite for fabricating ultrafine grained low-carbon steel with attractive strength was proposed. The results indicate that ultrafine-grain structured steel could be manufactured by cryorolling and the subsequent annealing of martensite. The mean ferrite size of 132.0 nm and [...] Read more.
A novel method of cryorolling martensite for fabricating ultrafine grained low-carbon steel with attractive strength was proposed. The results indicate that ultrafine-grain structured steel could be manufactured by cryorolling and the subsequent annealing of martensite. The mean ferrite size of 132.0 nm and the tensile strength of 978.1 MPa were obtained in a specimen with a reduction of 70% in thickness. There were peak value and valley value in the strength and grain size of ferrite with the increase of reduction from 50% to 80%, respectively. The further growth of ferrite grain at 80% reduction is attributed to the heavier distortion energy at large reduction, which activates the secondary recrystallization of ferrite. Furthermore, the distribution of ferrite grains became more uniform with increasing of reduction from 50% to 70%. Additionally, the amount of lamellar dislocation cell substructure increased with the reduction at liquid nitrogen temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing-Structure-Property Relationships in Metals)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Tempering on the Microstructure and Properties of a High-Strength Bainite Rail Steel with Good Toughness
Metals 2018, 8(7), 484; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8070484
Received: 5 June 2018 / Revised: 21 June 2018 / Accepted: 22 June 2018 / Published: 25 June 2018
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Abstract
An advanced bainite rail with high strength–toughness combination was produced in a steel mill and the effects of tempering on the microstructure and properties of the bainite rail steel were investigated by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron back-scattering diffraction and X-ray diffraction. [...] Read more.
An advanced bainite rail with high strength–toughness combination was produced in a steel mill and the effects of tempering on the microstructure and properties of the bainite rail steel were investigated by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron back-scattering diffraction and X-ray diffraction. Results indicate that the tensile strength, elongation and impact toughness were about 1470 MPa, 14.5% and 83 J/cm2, respectively, after tempering at 400 °C for 200 min. Therefore, a high-strength bainite rail steel with good toughness was developed. In addition, the amount of retained austenite (RA) decreased due to bainite transformation after low-temperature tempering (300 °C) and RA almost disappeared after high-temperature tempering (500 °C). Moreover, as the tempering temperature increased, the tensile strength of the rail head first decreased due to the decreased dislocation density and carbon content in bainite ferrite and the coarseness of bainite ferrite, and then increased because of carbide precipitation at high-temperature tempering. Furthermore, RA played a significant role in the toughness of bainite rail. The elongation and toughness of the rail obviously decreased after tempering at 500 °C for 200 min because of the disappearance of RA and appearance of carbides. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing-Structure-Property Relationships in Metals)
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Open AccessArticle
Microstructural and XRD Analysis and Study of the Properties of the System Ti-TiAl-B4C Processed under Different Operational Conditions
Metals 2018, 8(5), 367; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8050367
Received: 24 April 2018 / Revised: 14 May 2018 / Accepted: 17 May 2018 / Published: 21 May 2018
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Abstract
High specific modulus materials are considered excellent for the aerospace industry. The system Ti-TiAl-B4C is presented herein as an alternative material. Secondary phases formed in situ during fabrication vary depending on the processing conditions and composition of the starting materials. The [...] Read more.
High specific modulus materials are considered excellent for the aerospace industry. The system Ti-TiAl-B4C is presented herein as an alternative material. Secondary phases formed in situ during fabrication vary depending on the processing conditions and composition of the starting materials. The final behaviors of these materials are therefore difficult to predict. This research focuses on the study of the system Ti-TiAl-B4C, whereby relations between microstructure and properties can be predicted in terms of the processing parameters of the titanium matrix composites (TMCs). The powder metallurgy technique employed to fabricate the TMCs was that of inductive hot pressing (iHP) since it offers versatility and flexibility. The short processing time employed (5 min) was set in order to test the temperature as a major factor of influence in the secondary reactions. The pressure was also varied. In order to perform this research, not only were X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analyses performed, but also microstructural characterization through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Significant results showed that there was an inflection temperature from which the trend to form secondary compounds depended on the starting material used. Hence, the addition of TiAl as an elementary blend or as prealloyed powder played a significant role in the final behavior of the TMCs fabricated, where the prealloyed TiAl provides a better precursor of the formation of the reinforcement phases from 1100 °C regardless of the pressure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing-Structure-Property Relationships in Metals)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Alloys for Aeronautic Applications: State of the Art and Perspectives
Metals 2019, 9(6), 662; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9060662
Received: 16 May 2019 / Revised: 3 June 2019 / Accepted: 4 June 2019 / Published: 6 June 2019
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Abstract
In recent years, a great effort has been devoted to developing a new generation of materials for aeronautic applications. The driving force behind this effort is the reduction of costs, by extending the service life of aircraft parts (structural and engine components) and [...] Read more.
In recent years, a great effort has been devoted to developing a new generation of materials for aeronautic applications. The driving force behind this effort is the reduction of costs, by extending the service life of aircraft parts (structural and engine components) and increasing fuel efficiency, load capacity and flight range. The present paper examines the most important classes of metallic materials including Al alloys, Ti alloys, Mg alloys, steels, Ni superalloys and metal matrix composites (MMC), with the scope to provide an overview of recent advancements and to highlight current problems and perspectives related to metals for aeronautics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing-Structure-Property Relationships in Metals)
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