Phase Transitions and Heat Treatment of Steels

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701). This special issue belongs to the section "Metal Casting, Forming and Heat Treatment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2022) | Viewed by 3507

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819, China
Interests: phase transformation in steels; strengthening and toughening mechanisms in metals; materials design of advanced steels for press-hardening steels, advanced high strength sheet steels, and bearing steels; welding metallurgy of sheet steels

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Steels are the most widely used metallic materials by human beings currently, the worldwide production was over 1.8 billion tons in 2020, far exceeding the sum of all the other metals. The amazing productivity, low production costs, and low life-cycle carbon emission of steels will ensure their continued extensive use far into the foreseeable future. The commercially available steels possess a very wide range of mechanical properties (e.g., the ultimate tensile strength ranges from 100 to 5500 MPa) arising from their microstructure complexity. The key reason why there are various microstructures in the steel is phase transformation can occur during heat or thermo-mechanical treatments, which is the only metal to play with carbon in diverse phases. The transformation can occur either by breaking all the bonds and rearranging the atoms into an alternative pattern (reconstructive transformation) or by homogeneously deforming the original pattern into a new crystal structure, i.e., displacive or shear transformation. Many essential properties of steels depend on the atomic mechanism of phase change.

Although the steel industry is sometimes seen as a “sunset industry”, the iron and steel science is advancing and there are new technologies for further improvements of the existing and the development of new steels coming. The Special Issue focuses on the phase transformation and novel heat treatment process design of steels, especially those related to the mechanical properties. I am honored to be invited to establish the Special Issue of Metals. Warmly welcome contributions from researchers all over the world. I hope this work will deepen our understanding and promote the progress of the subject.

Prof. Dr. Hongliang Yi
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Transformation in steels
  • Heat treatment of steels
  • Advanced high strength sheet steels
  • Thermo-mechanical treatment
  • Microstructure and process design
  • Microstructure characterization of steels
  • Mechanical properties of steels
  • Industrial application of steels

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

35 pages, 49616 KiB  
Review
Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Steels and Alloys Subjected to Large-Strain Cold-to-Warm Deformation
by Anastasiia Dolzhenko, Marina Tikhonova, Rustam Kaibyshev and Andrey Belyakov
Metals 2022, 12(3), 454; https://doi.org/10.3390/met12030454 - 08 Mar 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3009
Abstract
The effect of large-strain cold-to-warm deformation on the microstructures and mechanical properties of various steels and alloys is critically reviewed. The review is mainly focused on the microstructure evolution, whereas the deformation textures are cursorily considered without detailed examination. The deformation microstructures are [...] Read more.
The effect of large-strain cold-to-warm deformation on the microstructures and mechanical properties of various steels and alloys is critically reviewed. The review is mainly focused on the microstructure evolution, whereas the deformation textures are cursorily considered without detailed examination. The deformation microstructures are considered in a wide strain range, from early straining to severe deformations. Such an approach offers a clearer view of how the deformation mechanisms affect the structural changes leading to the final microstructures evolved in large strains. The general regularities of microstructure evolution are shown for different deformation methods, including conventional rolling/swaging and special techniques, such as equal channel angular pressing or torsion under high pressure. The microstructural changes during deformations under different processing conditions are considered as functions of total strain. Then, some important mutual relationships between the microstructural parameters, e.g., grain size vs. dislocation density, are revealed and discussed. Particular attention is paid to the mechanisms of microstructure evolution that are responsible for the grain refinement. The development of an ultrafine-grained microstructure during large strain deformation is considered in terms of continuous dynamic recrystallization. The regularities of the latter are discussed in comparison with conventional (discontinuous) dynamic recrystallization and grain subdivision (fragmentation) phenomenon. The structure–property relations are quantitatively represented for the structural strengthening, taking into account various mechanisms of dislocation retardation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Phase Transitions and Heat Treatment of Steels)
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