Special Issue "Advances in Metals and Alloys Used for Medical and Dental Applications"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Tae-Yub Kwon
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Dental Biomaterials, School of Dentistry, and Institute for Biomaterials Research & Development, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea
Interests: bonding; metallic biomaterials; biocompatibility
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Du-Hyeong Lee
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea
Interests: CAD/CAM; fixed dental prosthodontics; dental implant
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metals and alloys for medical and dental applications should satisfy the increasingly demanding manufacturing requirements and service conditions of the metal industry. In general, biomedical metals and alloys can be chosen on the basis of their corrosion resistance, yield strength, Young’s modulus, toughness, fatigue strength, and hardness or wear resistance. In some instances, the application of a metal or alloy may require a combination of two or more of these properties, with each reaching an acceptable level of clinical performance. We should first review the current status of biomedical metallic materials. With advancing technology and more challenging conditions, we also should be aware of the situation that the need has arisen for new advances in biomedical metals and alloys. Therefore, as guest editors, we cordially invite you to submit a manuscript to the upcoming Special Issue on “Advances in Metals and Alloys Used for Medical and Dental Applications”. The aim of this Special Issue is to advance the state of knowledge and expertise in the field of metallic biomaterials. This Special Issue will include original research articles, reviews, and communications. Suggested topics include but are not limited to:

  • Physical and mechanical properties;
  • Young’s modulus;
  • Fatigue failure;
  • Corrosion resistance;
  • Biocompatibility;
  • Clinical applications;
  • Titanium and dental implant;
  • Mechanical testing of metallic biomaterials;
  • Casting;
  • Subtractive and additive manufacturing;
  • Dimensional accuracy of metal frameworks;
  • Coating and surface modification;
  • Sterilization and cleaning of metallic biomaterials;
  • New generation metallic biomaterials.

Prof. Dr. Tae-Yub Kwon
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Du-Hyeong Lee
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Metallic biomaterials
  • Microstructure
  • Mechanical properties
  • Corrosion resistance
  • Biocompatibility
  • Dental implant
  • Titanium
  • Metallic manufacturing
  • Surface modification

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Cyclic Solution Heat Treatment on the Martensitic Phase Transformation and Grain Refinement of Co-Cr-Mo Dental Alloy
Metals 2020, 10(7), 861; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10070861 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of continuous and discontinuous (cyclic) solution heat treatment on the athermal and isothermal ε martensite phase transformation in Co-28Cr-6Mo-0.3C implant alloy. The results showed that the cyclic solution heat treatment induced more of the [...] Read more.
The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of continuous and discontinuous (cyclic) solution heat treatment on the athermal and isothermal ε martensite phase transformation in Co-28Cr-6Mo-0.3C implant alloy. The results showed that the cyclic solution heat treatment induced more of the athermal ε martensite phase in the alloy than that of the continues one. In addition, the cyclic heat treatment contributes to the development of more isothermal martensite phase during isothermal aging at 850 °C and, moreover, grain refinement in the area beneath the sample surface. The severity of grain refinement was highly significant adjacent to the surface and decreased by increasing the distance from the sample free surface. This novel grain refinement in high-carbon Co-Cr-Mo alloy was attributed to the generation of larger quenching thermal stresses introduced beneath the surface during cyclic solution treatment. The repetitive heating/cooling cycle modifies the surface properties, refines the grain size and leads to uniform dispersion of the secondary carbides. The corrosion resistance of the cyclically solution heat-treated samples was superior as compared to the as-cast one. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Corrosion Resistance and Ion Release of Dental Prosthesis of CoCr Obtained by CAD-CAM Milling, Casting and Laser Sintering
Metals 2020, 10(6), 827; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10060827 - 21 Jun 2020
Abstract
Corrosion resistance and ion release behavior have been evaluated for thirty dental restoration samples obtained by three different manufacturing systems: computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD-CAM), traditional casting and laser sintering. The alloy used was the CoCr alloy (same batch) generally used in clinical [...] Read more.
Corrosion resistance and ion release behavior have been evaluated for thirty dental restoration samples obtained by three different manufacturing systems: computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD-CAM), traditional casting and laser sintering. The alloy used was the CoCr alloy (same batch) generally used in clinical dentistry. Corrosion resistance has been evaluated by electrochemical testing in an artificial saliva medium at 37 °C. Corrosion parameters such as critical current density (icr), corrosion potential (Ecorr), and passive current density (ip), have been determined. Cobalt and Chromium ions released from the different samples have also been analyzed in an artificial saliva medium at 37 °C by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) at different immersion times. The casted samples showed higher corrosion rates and ion-release levels. The CAD-CAM milled samples presented lower ion-release levels and better corrosion resistance due to the total solubility of the chemical elements in only one phase with the same chemical composition. This homogeneity avoids the formation of electrochemical corrosion. Moreover, the absence of defects and residual stresses increases the corrosion resistance. Casted and laser sintered prostheses have shown the presence of Cr, W, and Nb rich-precipitates which are detrimental to the corrosion resistance. These precipitates produce a decrease in the Cr content on the surface. It is well known that the corrosion resistance increases with the Cr content by the formation of Chromium oxide on the surface that increases passivation. Consequently, the decrease in Cr induces an increase in corrosion and ion release. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Mechanical Properties of CoCr Dental-Prosthesis Restorations Made by Three Manufacturing Processes. Influence of the Microstructure and Topography
Metals 2020, 10(6), 788; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10060788 - 14 Jun 2020
Abstract
The aim of this study is to compare the mechanical properties of three different dental restorations’ manufacturing processes (CADCAM milling, casting and laser sintering) generated by only one laboratory scanner focusing on marginal fit analysis and their mechanical properties. A chrome-cobalt (Cr-Co) alloy [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to compare the mechanical properties of three different dental restorations’ manufacturing processes (CADCAM milling, casting and laser sintering) generated by only one laboratory scanner focusing on marginal fit analysis and their mechanical properties. A chrome-cobalt (Cr-Co) alloy from the same batch was used for three different methods to make an implant abutment. This simulates a maxillary right first molar that was fixed in a hemi-maxillary stone model. Five scans were performed by each tested framework. Nine frameworks were manufactured for each manufacture procedure. Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM) direct vision was used to marginal gap measurement in five critical points for each specimen. In order to fix the samples in the microscope chamber, the restorations were submitted at a compression load of 50 N. The samples always have the same orientation and conditions. The resolution of the microscope is 4 nm and it is equipped by J image software. The microstructure of the samples was also determined with the FE-SEM equipped with EDS-microanalysis. Roughness parameters were measured using White Light Interferometry (WLI). The arithmetical mean for the Ra and Rq of each sample was calculated. The samples were mechanically characterized by means of microhardness and flexural testing. Servo-hydraulic testing machine was used with cross-head rate of 1 mm/min. Two-way ANOVA statistical analysis was performed to determine whether the marginal discrepancies and mechanical properties were significantly different between each group (significance level p < 0.05). The overall mean marginal gap values were: from 50.53 ± 10.30 µm for the samples produced by CADCAM to 85.76 ± 22.56 µm for the samples produced by the casting method. Laser sintering presents a marginal gap of 60.95 ± 20.66 µm. The results revealed a statistically significant difference (p-value < 0.005) in the mean marginal gap between the CADCAM systems studied. The higher flexure load to fracture for these restorations were for CADCAM restoration and the lower was for the casting samples. For these restorations, CADCAM Restoration yielded a higher flexure load to fracture and Casting ones yielded the lower. Porosity and microstructure play a very important role in the mechanical properties. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Gallium Content and Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Corrosion Rate of Magnesium Binary Alloys
Metals 2019, 9(9), 990; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9090990 - 07 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The microstructure and corrosion rate of as-cast and heat-treated binary Mg-Ga alloys with gallium content ranging from 0.375 to 1.5 wt. % were investigated. The corrosion rate was determined by the weight loss method using a simulated body fluid (SBF). The microstructure of [...] Read more.
The microstructure and corrosion rate of as-cast and heat-treated binary Mg-Ga alloys with gallium content ranging from 0.375 to 1.5 wt. % were investigated. The corrosion rate was determined by the weight loss method using a simulated body fluid (SBF). The microstructure of the as-cast alloys showed an α-Mg matrix of dendritic morphology with intermetallic compounds Mg5Ga2 located mainly at the interdendritic regions. The fraction and size of the Mg5Ga2 particles increased with the amount of Ga in the alloy. The grain size decreased as the Ga content was increased. The products formed on the surface of the Mg-Ga alloys after immersion in SBF were MgO, Mg(OH)2, and calcium phosphates. The corrosion rate of the as-cast alloys was dependent on the Ga content. At concentrations lower than 1 wt. % the corrosion rate was similar to that of pure Mg (0.65 mm/year). However, Ga additions higher than 1 wt. % worsened the corrosion resistance. After heat treatment, the corrosion rate of Mg-Ga alloys decreased, and in the case of the alloys with Ga concentrations lower than 1 wt. %, corrosion rate was lower than that of pure Mg. Corrosion of these alloys after heat treatment was uniform. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
The Influence of Carbon Coatings on the Functional Properties of X39Cr13 and 316LVM Steels Intended for Biomedical Applications
Metals 2019, 9(8), 815; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9080815 - 24 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Carbon coatings are used in many different industrial areas, for example in cutting, electronics, or medical applications. On the one hand, carbon coatings have improved the functional properties of medical products because of their high biotolerance, which makes them an important material for [...] Read more.
Carbon coatings are used in many different industrial areas, for example in cutting, electronics, or medical applications. On the one hand, carbon coatings have improved the functional properties of medical products because of their high biotolerance, which makes them an important material for implant coatings. On the other hand, high rigidity and abrasion resistance are properties needed in case of surgical tools. Thus, the aim of this research was to study the influence of mechanical abrasion by tumbling and chemical passivation on carbon coatings deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering (RMS) and radio frequency plasma activated chemical vapor deposition (RF PACVD) of X39Cr13 (mainly used for surgical tools) and 316LVM (mainly used for implants). Functional properties, such as roughness, coatings adhesion (scratch test), and wettability were investigated. As a result, DLC coatings applied by magnetron sputtering were found to be the optimum surface treatment in terms of adhesion and wettability properties, being more appropriate for the use of X39Cr13 base than 316LVM for carbon layer deposition. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop