Special Issue "Latest Hydroforming Technology of Metallic Tubes and Sheets"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ken-ichi Manabe
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minamiosawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397, Japan
Interests: material processing; intelligent forming; process simulation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Yeong-Maw Hwang
Website
Guest Editor
National Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Mechanical and Electro-mechanical Engineering, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
Interests: material processing; theory of plasticity; mechanical design

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hydroforming processes of metal tubes and sheets are widely applied in manufacturing because of the increasing demand for lightweight parts in sectors such as the automobile, aerospace, and ship-building industries. This technology is relatively new compared with rolling, forging or stamping, so that there is no much knowledge available for the product or process designers. Comparing to conventional manufacturing via stamping and welding, In particular, tube hydroforming offers several advantages, such as (1) decrease in workpiece cost, tool cost and product weight, (2) improvement of structural stability and increase of the strength and stiffness of the formed parts, (3) more uniform thickness distribution, (4) fewer secondary operations, etc. However, this technology is suffering some disadvantages, such as slow cycle time, expensive equipment and lack of effective database for tooling and process design.

Compound forming, which involves hydroforming and other forming processes such as crushing or preforming, is implemented to achieve a lower clamping force and forming pressure, as well as to ensure a uniformly distributed thickness of the formed product. Other tube hydroforming related hydro-piercing, hydro-joining, hydro-flanging and hydro-inlaying are also important topics.

The aim of this Special Issue is to present the latest achievements in various tube and sheet hydroforming processes and other tube processing technology and Innovation. Through this Special Issue, comprehensive understanding of the present status and future trend of tube/sheet hydroforming technology are expected. Thus, all researchers in this field are invited to contribute.

If you need any further information about this Special Issue, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Prof. emer Ken-ichi Manabe
Prof. Dr. Yeong-Maw Hwang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Tube hydroforming
  • Sheet hydroforming
  • Light weight structure
  • Joining and piecing
  • Bending
  • Materials
  • Formability evaluation
  • Numerical methods
  • New processing technology and innovation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Circumferential Material Flow in the Hydroforming of Overlapping Blanks
Metals 2020, 10(7), 864; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10070864 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
The hydroforming of the overlapping blanks is a forming process where overlapping tubular blanks are used instead of tubes to enhance the forming limit and improve the thickness distribution. A distinguishing characteristic of the hydroforming of overlapping blanks is that the material can [...] Read more.
The hydroforming of the overlapping blanks is a forming process where overlapping tubular blanks are used instead of tubes to enhance the forming limit and improve the thickness distribution. A distinguishing characteristic of the hydroforming of overlapping blanks is that the material can flow along the circumferential direction easily. In this research, the circumferential material flow was investigated using overlapping blanks with axial constraints to study the circumferential material flow in the hydroforming of a variable-diameter part. AISI 304 stainless steel blanks were selected for numerical simulation and experimental research. The circumferential material flow distribution was obtained from the profile at the edge of the overlap. The peak value located at the middle cross-section. In addition, the circumferential material flow could be also reflected in the variation of the overlap angle. The variation of the overlap angle kept increasing as the initial overlap angle increased but the improvement of the thickness distribution did not. There was an optimal initial overlap angle to minimize the thinning ratio. An optimal thickness distribution was obtained when the initial angle was 120° for the hydroforming of the variable-diameter part with an expansion of 31.6%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Hydroforming Technology of Metallic Tubes and Sheets)
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Open AccessArticle
Oblique/Curved Tube Necking Formed by Synchronous Multipass Spinning
Metals 2020, 10(6), 733; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10060733 - 02 Jun 2020
Abstract
In this paper, we propose a method of forming a tube into an oblique/curved shape by synchronous multipass spinning, in which the forming roller reciprocates in the radial direction in synchrony with the rotation angle of the spindle while the roller moves back [...] Read more.
In this paper, we propose a method of forming a tube into an oblique/curved shape by synchronous multipass spinning, in which the forming roller reciprocates in the radial direction in synchrony with the rotation angle of the spindle while the roller moves back and forth along the workpiece in the axial direction to gradually deform a blank tube into a target shape. The target oblique/curved shape is expressed as a series of inclined circular cross sections. The contact position of the roller and the workpiece is calculated from the inclination angle, center coordinates, and diameter of the cross sections, considering the geometrical shape of the roller. The blank shape and the target shape are interpolated along normalized tool paths to generate the numerical control command of the roller. By this method, we experimentally formed aluminum tubes into curved shapes with various radii of curvature, and the forming accuracy, thickness distribution, and strain distribution are examined. We verified that the curved shapes with the target radii of curvature can be accurately realized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Hydroforming Technology of Metallic Tubes and Sheets)
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Open AccessArticle
A Vision-Based Fuzzy Control to Adjust Compression Speed for a Semi-Dieless Bellows-Forming
Metals 2020, 10(6), 720; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10060720 - 28 May 2020
Abstract
A novel semi-dieless bellows forming process with a local heating technique and axial compression has been initiated for the past years. However, this technique requires a high difficulty in maintaining the output quality due to its sensitivity to the processing conditions. The product [...] Read more.
A novel semi-dieless bellows forming process with a local heating technique and axial compression has been initiated for the past years. However, this technique requires a high difficulty in maintaining the output quality due to its sensitivity to the processing conditions. The product quality mainly depends on not only the temperature distribution in the radial and axial direction but also the compression ratio during the semi-dieless bellows process. A finite element model has clarified that a variety of temperature produced by unstable heating or cooling will promote an unstable bellows formation. An adjustment to the compression speed is adequate to compensate for the effect of the variety of temperatures in the bellows formation. Therefore, it is necessary to apply a real-time process for this process to obtain accurate and precise bellows. In this paper, we are proposing a vision-based fuzzy control to control bellows formation. Since semi-dieless bellows forming is an unsteady and complex deformation process, the application of image processing technology is suitable for sensing the process because of the possible wide analysis area afforded by applying the multi-sectional measuring. A vision sensing algorithm is developed to monitor the bellows height from the captured images. An adaptive fuzzy has been verified to control bellows formation from 5 mm stainless steel tube in to bellows profile up to 7 mm bellows height, processing speed up to 0.66 mm/s. The adaptive fuzzy control system is capable of appropriately adjusting the compression speed by evaluating the bellows formation progress. Appropriate compression speed paths guide bellows formation following deformation references. The results show that the bellows shape accuracy between target and experiment increase become 99.5% under given processing ranges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Hydroforming Technology of Metallic Tubes and Sheets)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Internal Pressure and Axial Compressive Displacement on the Formability of Small-Diameter ZM21 Magnesium Alloy Tubes in Warm Tube Hydroforming
Metals 2020, 10(5), 674; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10050674 - 21 May 2020
Abstract
In this study, the influence of internal pressure and axial compressive displacement on the formability of small-diameter ZM21 magnesium alloy tubes in warm tube hydroforming (THF) was examined experimentally and numerically. The deformation behavior of ZM21 tubes, with a 2.0 mm outer diameter [...] Read more.
In this study, the influence of internal pressure and axial compressive displacement on the formability of small-diameter ZM21 magnesium alloy tubes in warm tube hydroforming (THF) was examined experimentally and numerically. The deformation behavior of ZM21 tubes, with a 2.0 mm outer diameter and 0.2 mm wall thickness, was evaluated in taper-cavity and cylinder-cavity dies. The simulation code used was the dynamic explicit finite element (FE) method (FEM) code, LS-DYNA 3D. The experiments were conducted at 250 °C. This paper elucidated the deformation characteristics, forming defects and forming limit of ZM21 tubes. Their deformation behavior in the taper-cavity die was affected by the axial compressive direction. Additionally, the occurrence of tube buckling could be inferred by changes of the axial compression force, which were measured by the load cell during the processing. In addition, grain with twin boundaries and refined grain were observed at the bended areas of tapered tubes. The hydroformed samples could have a high strength. Moreover, wrinkles, which are caused under a lower internal pressure condition, were employed to avoid tube fractures during the axial feeding. The tube with wrinkles was expanded by a straightening process after the axial feed. It was found that the process of warm THF of the tubes in the cylinder-cavity die was successful. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Hydroforming Technology of Metallic Tubes and Sheets)
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