Special Issue "Application of Atom Probe Tomography in Metallic Materials"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Anna Ceguerra
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The University of Sydney. Australian Centre for Microscopy & Microanalysis, and School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
Interests: atom probe microscopy; atom probe tomography; scientific computing; materials science and engineering; nanoscale characterization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Atom probe tomography (APT) belongs to a family of techniques under the umbrella term “atom probe microscopy”. APT has been traditionally used to study metals and metal alloys, although its applications now include geological and biological materials. It is a technique that is unique in its ability to experimentally resolve the real-space, 3D position, and chemical identity of each individual atom within a 100 × 100 × 500 nm3 volume (or 100 million atoms). Usually this is the “go-to” technique when other characterization methods (such as light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy) have failed to determine the structural origin of a particular property, because the size scale of the phenomenon is too small. Important insights into the nanoscale structure of metal alloys, such as precipitates, grain boundaries, grain misorientation, solute clustering, and ordering, are all made possible with the information from APT.

In this Special Issue, we welcome contributions (original research articles or review articles) relating to the use of APT data in the study of metallic materials. The contribution could include new instrumentation or specimen preparation procedures enabling the study of metallic materials previously inaccessible by APT; a new analysis technique to interpret APT data; a new metallurgical or structure–property relationship insight gained from APT; or a study of previous literature to provide future directions for APT.

Dr. Anna Ceguerra
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • atom probe tomography
  • metallurgy
  • microscopy
  • nanoscale characterization

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Multiple Influences of Molybdenum on the Precipitation Process in a Martensitic PH Stainless Steel
Metals 2019, 9(10), 1118; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9101118 - 19 Oct 2019
Abstract
Molybdenum has been found to influence the complex precipitation process in a martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steel during aging at 475 °C in several different ways. Three steels with different Mo content (0, 1.2 and 2.3 at.%) were investigated. Studies of the microstructure [...] Read more.
Molybdenum has been found to influence the complex precipitation process in a martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steel during aging at 475 °C in several different ways. Three steels with different Mo content (0, 1.2 and 2.3 at.%) were investigated. Studies of the microstructure were performed with atom probe tomography and energy filtered transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that, at the initial stage of aging, a faster nucleation of Cu-rich clusters takes place with increasing Mo content. The Cu-clusters act as precipitation sites for other solute elements and promote the nucleation of Ni-rich phases. During further aging, a higher Mo content in the material instead slows down the growth and coarsening of the Ni-rich phases, because Mo segregates to the interface between precipitate and matrix. Additionally, Mo promotes decomposition of the matrix into α and α′ regions. After longer aging times (>40 h) quasicrystalline Mo-rich R′ phase forms (to a greater extent in the material having the highest Mo content). The observations serve to understand the hardness evolution during aging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Atom Probe Tomography in Metallic Materials)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Atom Probe Tomography of Aluminium Alloys: A Systematic Meta-Analysis Review of 2018
Metals 2019, 9(10), 1071; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9101071 - 01 Oct 2019
Abstract
Atom probe tomography (APT) is a microscopy technique that provides a unique combination of information, specifically the position and elemental identity of each atom in three dimensions. Although the mass and spatial resolution is not perfect, we are still able to gain insights [...] Read more.
Atom probe tomography (APT) is a microscopy technique that provides a unique combination of information, specifically the position and elemental identity of each atom in three dimensions. Although the mass and spatial resolution is not perfect, we are still able to gain insights into materials science questions that we cannot access using other techniques. This systematic meta-analysis review summarises research in 2018 that used APT to study materials science questions in aluminium alloys. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Atom Probe Tomography in Metallic Materials)
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