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Special Issue "Advanced Manufacturing Technologies"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Smart Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 October 2022) | Viewed by 4145

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ricardo Branco
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, CEMMPRE, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: structural integrity; fatigue and fracture; additive manufacturing; composite materials; aggressive environments
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Filippo Berto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Renowned Chair and Distinguished Professor of Mechanics of Materials, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy
Interests: mechanics of materials; fatigue; fracture; mechanics; structural integrity; materials science & engineering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In this high-tech world, materials undoubtedly play an important role in technological advancement. The future calls for new advanced materials with enhanced performance and novel functions, innovation in traditional materials, and reuse of materials. This can increase the demand for advanced manufacturing technologies.

The objective of this Special Issue is to publish outstanding papers that address cutting-edge advances, new ideas, and research results in the field of advanced manufacturing technologies. Examples of innovative and successful industrial applications, as well as nonconventional approaches, are also encouraged. The topics covered by this Special Issue include (but are not limited to): (i) materials science and engineering; (ii) materials manufacturing and processing; (iii) materials properties and evaluation; (iv) measuring techniques and alloy design; and (iv) new applications. Research based on analytical methods, experimental testing, or numerical modeling is acceptable. Literature reviews and communication articles are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Ricardo Branco
Prof. Dr. Filippo Berto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Metallic alloys
  • Superplastic materials
  • Ceramics and glasses
  • Composites
  • Amorphous materials
  • Nanomaterials
  • Biomaterials
  • Multifunctional materials
  • Smart materials
  • Engineering polymers
  • Functional materials
  • Magnetic materials
  • Superconducting materials
  • Casting
  • Powder metallurgy
  • Welding
  • Sintering
  • Thermochemical treatment
  • Coatings
  • Surface treatment
  • Machining
  • Plastic forming

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Microstructure, Fractography, and Mechanical Properties of Hardox 500 Steel TIG-Welded Joints by Using Different Filler Weld Wires
Materials 2022, 15(22), 8196; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15228196 - 18 Nov 2022
Viewed by 469
Abstract
This paper deals with the effects of three low-carbon steel filler metals consisting of ferritic and austenitic phases on the weld joints of the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of Hardox 500 steel. The correlation between the microstructure and mechanical properties of the [...] Read more.
This paper deals with the effects of three low-carbon steel filler metals consisting of ferritic and austenitic phases on the weld joints of the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of Hardox 500 steel. The correlation between the microstructure and mechanical properties of the weld joints was investigated. For this purpose, macro and microstructure were examined, and then microhardness, tensile, impact, and fracture toughness tests were carried out to analyze the mechanical properties of joints. The results of optical microscopy (OM) images showed that the weld zones (WZ) of all three welds were composed of different ferritic morphologies, including allotriomorphic ferrite, Widmanstätten ferrite, and acicular ferrite, whereas the morphology of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) showed the various microstructures containing mostly ferrite and pearlite phases. Further, based on mechanical tests, the second filler with ferritic microstructure represented better elongation, yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, impact toughness, and fracture toughness due to having a higher amount of acicular ferrite phase compared to the weld joints concerning the other fillers consisting of austenitic and ferritic-austenitic. However, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images on the fracture surfaces of the tensile test showed a ductile-type fracture with a large number of deep and shallow voids while on the fracture surfaces resulting from the Charpy impact tests and both ductile and cleavage modes of fracture took place, indicating the initiation and propagation of cracks, respectively. The presence of acicular ferrite as a soft phase that impedes the dislocation pile-up brings about the ductile mode of fracture while inclusions may cause stress concentration, thus producing cleavage surfaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Manufacturing Technologies)
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Article
Mouldability of Additively Manufactured Attachments on Multipoint Tools
Materials 2022, 15(22), 8137; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15228137 - 16 Nov 2022
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Abstract
Enhanced multipoint moulding with additive attachments (EMMA) is a process combining vacuum-assisted multipoint moulding (VAMM) and additively manufactured moulding attachments for carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) component production. The aim of this initial study is to investigate the mouldability of the additively manufactured [...] Read more.
Enhanced multipoint moulding with additive attachments (EMMA) is a process combining vacuum-assisted multipoint moulding (VAMM) and additively manufactured moulding attachments for carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) component production. The aim of this initial study is to investigate the mouldability of the additively manufactured attachments on the multipoint tool. For this purpose, two different test specimens were defined, the VAMM machine was adjusted, the attachments were additively built with the robot on the curved silicone interpolation layer and lastly, the CFRP specimens were moulded. The fabrication results were analysed with surface comparisons to check that there was no displacement of the attachments during moulding. A visual evaluation of the manufactured components was carried out, and the overall dimensional accuracy was assessed by comparing the surface with the target geometry. The results showed a very good agreement between the shapes before and after the moulding and thus prove that the attachments were not postponed in the moulding process. The optical evaluation confirms good moulding results for the parts manufactured with the enhanced multipoint moulding with additive attachments. Moreover, the evaluation shows that the major parts of the specimens comply with the permissible tolerance of t = 6 mm defined in ISO 20457. To the authors’ best knowledge, this is the first study that has investigated the entire EMMA process and systematically proved the mouldability of the additively manufactured attachments on multipoint tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Manufacturing Technologies)
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Article
Exploiting Partial Solubility in Partially Fluorinated Thermoplastic Blends to Improve Adhesion during Fused Deposition Modeling
Materials 2022, 15(22), 8062; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15228062 - 15 Nov 2022
Viewed by 404
Abstract
This work studies the effect of interlayer adhesion on mechanical performance of fluorinated thermoplastics produced by fused deposition modeling (FDM). Here, we study the anisotropic mechanical response of 3D-printed binary blends of poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) with the [...] Read more.
This work studies the effect of interlayer adhesion on mechanical performance of fluorinated thermoplastics produced by fused deposition modeling (FDM). Here, we study the anisotropic mechanical response of 3D-printed binary blends of poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) with the isotropic mechanical response of these blends fabricated via injection molding. Various PVDF/PMMA filament compositions were produced by twin-screw extrusion and, subsequently, injection-molded or 3D printed into dog-bone shapes. Specimen mechanical and thermal properties were evaluated by mode I tensile testing and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. Results show that higher PMMA concentration not only improved the tensile strength and decreased ductility but reduced PVDF crystallization. As expected, injection-molded samples revealed better mechanical properties compared to 3D printed specimens. Interestingly, 3D printed blends with lower PMMA content demonstrated better diffusion (adhesion) across interfaces than those with a higher amount of PMMA. The present study provides new findings that may be used to tune mechanical response in 3D printed fluorinated thermoplastics, particularly for energy applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Manufacturing Technologies)
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Article
Fatigue Modeling and Numerical Analysis of Re-Filling Probe Hole of Friction Stir Spot Welded Joints in Aluminum Alloys
Materials 2021, 14(9), 2171; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14092171 - 23 Apr 2021
Viewed by 1406
Abstract
In the present study, the fatigue behavior and tensile strength of A6061-T4 aluminum alloy, joined by friction stir spot welding (FSSW), are numerically investigated. The 3D finite element model (FEM) is used to analyze the FSSW joint by means of Abaqus software. The [...] Read more.
In the present study, the fatigue behavior and tensile strength of A6061-T4 aluminum alloy, joined by friction stir spot welding (FSSW), are numerically investigated. The 3D finite element model (FEM) is used to analyze the FSSW joint by means of Abaqus software. The tensile strength is determined for FSSW joints with both a probe hole and a refilled probe hole. In order to calculate the fatigue life of FSSW joints, the hysteresis loop is first determined, and then the plastic strain amplitude is calculated. Finally, by using the Coffin-Manson equation, fatigue life is predicted. The results were verified against available experimental data from other literature, and a good agreement was observed between the FEM results and experimental data. The results showed that the joint’s tensile strength without a probe hole (refilled hole) is higher than the joint with a probe hole. Therefore, re-filling the probe hole is an effective method for structures jointed by FSSW subjected to a static load. The fatigue strength of the joint with a re-filled probe hole was nearly the same as the structure with a probe hole at low applied loads. Additionally, at a high applied load, the fatigue strength of joints with a refilled probe hole was slightly lower than the joint with a probe hole. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Manufacturing Technologies)
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