Special Issue "Multifunctional Materials & Composites "

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Micaela Castellino
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Applied Science and Technology Department (DISAT), Polytechnic of Turin, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Torino, Italy
Interests: carbon nanotubes; chemical vapor deposition; material characteristics; materials; nanocomposites experimental physics; nanomaterials; physical chemistry; solid state physics; thin films and nanotechnology; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Multifunctional materials and composites are designed to achieve higher functionality, if compared to their own components, since the best attributes of the single materials can be coupled together to create a brand-new materials that has a broader spectrum of desired properties.

This kind of materials have great potential to cause new, improved performance by reducing dimension, weight, expense, and energy consumption, while enhancing output, safety, and versatility.

Nowadays we can find this kind of multiple function material in nature if we consider, for instance, biological materials, since they are able to perform sensing, and aid recovery, movement, energy conversion, and so on, all in one simple organism. These complex systems have evolved in nature over centuries to reach their level of perfection to fulfil their tasks through self-evolution.

Therefore, scientists are now trying to mimic these materials by designing artificial multifunctional materials by combining materials sciences and engineering know-how in order to recreate these high-performing systems in labs.

Research interests are mainly focused on the electro/thermo-mechanical and physico-chemical behaviour of advanced engineering materials, including but not restricted to metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) and carbon-based nanocomposites, to custom-made membranes, smart multifunctional coatings and 3D fiber networks, amongst others.

Research groups are thus encouraged to create their next-generation materials by designing, developing and engineering them, aiming at a wider range of functional and structural applications, endorsing the present and future challenges in energy conversion, environmental sustainability and healthcare promotion.

To reach this goal, synergistic work has to be carried out by coupling experimental and theorethical approaches. Cutting-edge experimental techniques, such as in-situ electron microscopies and spectroscopies, morphological analysis, and mechanical tests, in combination with theoretical modelling (quantum mechanical and finite-element calculations) are needed.

This short introduction to this Special Issue only scratches the surface of all the concepts developed to date, on which we welcome papers.

Dr. Micaela Castellino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Multifunctional materials
  • Multiscale composites
  • Synthesis
  • Properties
  • Characterisation
  • Application
  • Smart materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Electrophysical Properties of PMN-PT-Ferrite Ceramic Composites
Materials 2019, 12(20), 3281; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12203281 - 09 Oct 2019
Abstract
Ferroelectromagnetic composites based on (1−x)PMN-(x)PT (PMN-PT) powder and Ni-Zn ferrite powder were obtained and are described in this work. As a ferroelectric component, we used (1−x)PMN-(x)PT solid solution (with x = 0.25, 0.28, 0.31, 0.34, [...] Read more.
Ferroelectromagnetic composites based on (1−x)PMN-(x)PT (PMN-PT) powder and Ni-Zn ferrite powder were obtained and are described in this work. As a ferroelectric component, we used (1−x)PMN-(x)PT solid solution (with x = 0.25, 0.28, 0.31, 0.34, 0.37, 0.40), synthesized using the sol-gel method. As a magnetic component, we used nickel-zinc ferrite, obtained using classic ceramic technology. The six compositions of PMN-PT used have rhombohedral symmetry, tetragonal one and mixture of these phases (morphotropic phase area), depending on x. The final ceramic composite samples were obtained using the classic methods involving the calcination route and pressureless final sintering (densification). The properties of the obtained ceramic composite samples were investigated, including microstructure SEM (scanning electron microscope), dielectric properties, electromechanical properties, and DC (Direct Current) electrical conductivity. Results showed that the microstructures of the PP-F composite samples characterized by larger grains were better crystallized, compared with the microstructures of the PMN-PT ceramic samples. The magnetic properties do not depend on the ferroelectric component of the composite samples, while the insertion of ferrite into the PMN-PT compound reduces the values of remnant and spontaneous polarization, as well as the coercive field. The dielectric measurements also indicated that the magnetic subsystem influences the dielectric properties. The present results show that the PP-F ceramic composite has good dielectric, magnetic, and piezoelectric properties, which predisposes this type of material to specific applications in microelectronics and micromechatronics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multifunctional Materials & Composites )
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Open AccessArticle
Thermal Properties of Composite Polymer Electrolytes Poly(Ethylene Oxide)/Sodium Trifluoroacetate/Aluminum Oxide (PEO)10CF3COONa + x wt.% Al2O3
Materials 2019, 12(9), 1464; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12091464 - 07 May 2019
Abstract
Polymeric membranes of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and sodium trifluoroacetate (PEO:CF3COONa) combined with different concentrations of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) particles were analyzed by impedance spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TGA). DSC results show changes in the [...] Read more.
Polymeric membranes of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and sodium trifluoroacetate (PEO:CF3COONa) combined with different concentrations of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) particles were analyzed by impedance spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TGA). DSC results show changes in the crystalline fraction of PEO when the concentration of Al2O3 is increased. TGA analysis showed thermal stability up to 430 K showing small changes with the addition of alumina particles. The decrease in crystalline fraction for membranes with low Al2O3 concentration is associated with the increase in conductivity of (PEO)10CF3COONa + x wt.% Al2O3 composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multifunctional Materials & Composites )
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