Special Issue "Research and Development of Modified Building Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Construction and Building Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Maria Stefanidou
Website
Guest Editor
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: cement, lime, bricks, stones, additives, coatings

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Materials scientists study traditional materials and building technology with the aim to learn, transfer knowledge, and advance it. Additionally, newly developed cement-based materials are evolving in order to fulfil the requirements needed for construction. Composites and modified materials are using nanotechnology and alkali-activated mechanisms as well as reactive additives in order to improve their durability and address their inherent weaknesess. Cheap, easy-to-find, environmentally friendly, and effective additives can improve the insulation and consistency of composite materials, influencing fresh and hardened properties. Modified coatings can improve properties such as hydrophobicity, roughness, self-cleanliness, or even adhesion. Material modification can be achieved by different ways either within the structure or by elaborating their surface. Nevertheless, the aim is to produce durable materials with innovative properties able to solve complex structural problems.

Assoc. Prof. Maria Stefanidou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cement
  • lime
  • bio-fibres
  • additives
  • coatings
  • nano-modified
  • alkali-activated

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of the Combination of Superabsorbent Polymers for Autogenous Shrinkage Control with Steel Fibers of High-Performance Concrete under Uniaxial Tension Using DIC
Materials 2020, 13(20), 4638; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13204638 - 17 Oct 2020
Abstract
This paper presents a study of the effect of a superabsorbent polymer (SAP) for autogenous shrinkage control on the uniaxial tensile behavior of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC). The use of fibers and SAP potentially increases the durability of the concrete, preventing cracking [...] Read more.
This paper presents a study of the effect of a superabsorbent polymer (SAP) for autogenous shrinkage control on the uniaxial tensile behavior of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC). The use of fibers and SAP potentially increases the durability of the concrete, preventing cracking by autogenous shrinkage and enhancing post-cracking behavior. Furthermore, SAP can provide further hydration for self-healing purposes and improve the ductility of the SFRC. In order to evaluate the effect of the addition of SAP in SFRC, dog-bone SFRC specimens with different dosages of superabsorbent polymers were cast and tested under uniaxial tension. The digital image correlation (DIC) technique was used to understand the effect of SAP on the steel fibers’ crack-bridging mechanisms. Surface strains and crack openings were inferred using the DIC technique. The effect of SAP and fibers on fresh and hardened concrete was individually investigated by flow tests and compressive strength tests. Autogenous shrinkage was measured in plain concrete to investigate the minimum SAP content required to mitigate autogenous shrinkage of 0.3%. The use of 0.3% SAP was also sufficient to reach multiple cracking behavior. This content of SAP completely suppressed the autogenous shrinkage with minimal side effects on compressive strength. An analytical formulation for the tensile behavior of SFRC was developed using the variable engagement model, presenting a mean correlation of R2 of 0.97 with the experimental results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research and Development of Modified Building Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Long-Term Behavior and Durability of Alkali-Activated Clay Mortars
Materials 2020, 13(17), 3790; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13173790 - 27 Aug 2020
Abstract
The need to increase the durability of clay-based materials, due to their inherent low strength and vulnerability in contact with water, led researchers to examine different options. In this paper, clay mortars were produced using four different activating solutions. Alkali hydroxides, alkali carbonates, [...] Read more.
The need to increase the durability of clay-based materials, due to their inherent low strength and vulnerability in contact with water, led researchers to examine different options. In this paper, clay mortars were produced using four different activating solutions. Alkali hydroxides, alkali carbonates, and alkali silicates activating solutions were used. Interest is given to long term properties while their behavior to wetting–drying and freeze–thaw cycles is recorded. In total, the results of the experiments indicated the positive effect of the potassium metasilicate on mechanical characteristics presenting, however, low performance at wetting–drying. The combination of sodium metasilicate with sodium hydroxide solution has also presented a positive effect on both mechanical and physical properties. In contrast, sodium carbonate acted better in enhancing physical properties and granting water-resistant abilities. Moreover, the performance of the specimens mixed with water–glass addition presented excellent volume stability and low mass loss in durability tests. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research and Development of Modified Building Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Ultralight Filler on the Properties of Hydrated Lime Injection Grout for the Consolidation of Detached Historic Decorative Plasters
Materials 2020, 13(15), 3360; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13153360 - 29 Jul 2020
Abstract
Injection-grout density is an important parameter when its additional weight leads to consolidated decorative plasters becoming damaged. This is especially evident in larger detached areas. In this study, thin-walled soda–lime–borosilicate glass microspheres were used as a density-reducing constituent in hydrated lime grout mixtures. [...] Read more.
Injection-grout density is an important parameter when its additional weight leads to consolidated decorative plasters becoming damaged. This is especially evident in larger detached areas. In this study, thin-walled soda–lime–borosilicate glass microspheres were used as a density-reducing constituent in hydrated lime grout mixtures. The normal density grout composition—one volume part hydrated lime and three volume parts inert limestone filler with 0.5% of the polycarboxylate ether-based superplasticiser—was modified with partial substitution of the limestone filler with lightweight glass microspheres. The following volumetric proportions between limestone filler and glass microspheres were used: 100%:0%, 67%:33%, 50%:50%, 33%:67%, and 0%:100%. With the increase of the glass microspheres’ volume, the density of the grout is gradually reduced. Furthermore, there is a decrease in the stability and injectability of fresh grout. In its hardened state, the grout’s strength again reduces gradually, but there is no significant change in the grout’s water absorption and water-vapour resistance. The resistance of the grout to freezing–thawing and heating–cooling cycles using distilled water or salt solution is highly improved when the microspheres are present. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research and Development of Modified Building Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Properties of Concrete Made with Low-Emission Cements CEM II/C-M and CEM VI
Materials 2020, 13(10), 2257; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13102257 - 14 May 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
The paper presents the composition and properties of low-emission ternary cements: Portland multicomponent cement CEM II/C-M and multicomponent cement CEM VI. In the ternary cements, Portland clinker was replaced at the levels of 40% and 55% with a mixture of the main components [...] Read more.
The paper presents the composition and properties of low-emission ternary cements: Portland multicomponent cement CEM II/C-M and multicomponent cement CEM VI. In the ternary cements, Portland clinker was replaced at the levels of 40% and 55% with a mixture of the main components such as limestone (LL), granulated blast furnace slag (S) and siliceous fly ash (V). Portland multicomponent cements CEM II/C-M and CEM VI are low-emission binders with CO2 emissions ranging from 340 (CEM VI) kg to 453 (CEM II/C-M) kg per Mg of cement. The results obtained indicate the possibility of a wider use of ground limestone (LL) in cement composition. This is important in the case of limited market availability of fly ash and granulated blast furnace slag. The tests conducted on concrete have shown that the necessary condition for obtaining a high strength class and durability of concrete from CEM II/C-M and CEM VI ternary cements is low water–cement ratio. Durability characteristics of concrete (carbonation susceptibility, chloride ion permeation, frost resistance) made of CEM II/C-M and CEM VI cements were determined after 90 days of hardening. This period of curing reflects the performance properties of the concrete in a more effective way. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research and Development of Modified Building Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Strength Properties of Cement Composites
Materials 2020, 13(6), 1305; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13061305 - 13 Mar 2020
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on strength the properties of cement composites when surfactant (SAA) was applied as the dispersion method. TritonX-100 (TX10) was used as the SAA to pretreat SWCNTs, which has been proved to [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate the effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on strength the properties of cement composites when surfactant (SAA) was applied as the dispersion method. TritonX-100 (TX10) was used as the SAA to pretreat SWCNTs, which has been proved to perform well in dispersing the agglomerates of SWCNTs. In this study, four different concentration of SWCNTs, namely 0.00 wt%, 0.02 wt%, 0.04 wt%, and 0.06 wt% by the mass of cement, were used to prepare cement composite specimens. The compressive strength and flexural strength of specimens were tested and recorded. The results show that the compressive and flexural strengths of cement composites decreased with the increase in the concentration of SWCNTs without the addition of TX10. However, when SWCNT suspensions were pretreated with TX10, the strength variation pattern changed; the compressive and flexural strengths of cement composites increased as a function of the concentration of SWCNTs, although there were reductions compared to non-TX10-treated specimens at all concentrations of SWCNTs. Furthermore, the relationship between the strength of cement composites and bulk density of specimens was considered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research and Development of Modified Building Materials)
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