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Special Issue "Novel Metal Carbide/Carbonitride Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Carbon Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2019) | Viewed by 9732

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Günter Motz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Ceramic Materials Engineering, University of Bayreuth, D-95447 Bayreuth, Germany
Interests: precursor synthesis and modification; hybrid-polymers; [email protected]; ceramic fibers; polymer and ceramic coatings; porous ceramics; catalytic active ceramics; ceramic/ceramic compounds; ceramic/metal compounds; new ceramization techniques
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Gabriela Mera
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Materials and Earth Science Department, TU Darmstadt, D-64287 Darmstadt, Germany
Interests: ceramics and ceramic nanocomposites; multifunctional nanomaterials; low-dimensional nanocarbon-based materials; polymer-derived ceramics, sol-gel science; polymer and organometallic chemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Increasing economic and ecological demands, as well as stricter governmental regulations, require the development of novel multifunctional materials for applications in different fields of life and technology. In this context, metal carbide and carbonitrides are exceptional materials that show outstanding properties, such as high hardness, ultra-high temperature stability, creep resistance, high electrical and thermal conductivity, paramagnetic properties and photoluminescence. In addition to structural applications, metal carbides and carbonitride are very interesting materials for energy conversion and storage, electromagnetic shielding, and catalysts. Thus, they have attracted considerable attention in the last few years and several technical applications have been reported. A wide variety of synthetic tools can be applied for the synthesis of metal carbide and carbonitrides as 2D materials (MXenes), monoliths, powder or thin films. For this purpose, solid-state reactions, sol-gel synthesis, polymer-derived ceramics route, sintering and deposition techniques can be applied.

The scopes of this Special Issue include, without being limited to, the following topics:

  • Synthesis Methods: Gas-phase techniques (e.g., CVD, ALD[DM1] , etc.); liquid-phase methods (sol-gel, solvothermal, etc.); and solid-state procedures (different sintering techniques, polymer-derived ceramics; mechanical alloying, etc.).
  • Properties: High temperature; mechanical; charge carriers transport; thermal transport; electronic; optical; magnetic; catalytic, etc.
  • Micro-/nanostructure
  • Applications: High-temperature structural applications; electronic applications; catalysis; energy conversion and storage, lightning, coatings, etc.

It is our pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews that cover all aspects (i.e., synthesis–structure–property relationships, applications and future directions) of metal carbide, metal carbonitride, metal carbodiimide and their composite materials are all welcome.

Dr. Günter Motz
Dr. Gabriela Mera
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Main group metal carbide and carbonitride
  • Transition metal carbide and carbonitride
  • Main group metal and transition metal carbodiimide and/or cyanamides
  • 2D Metal carbide and carbonitride (MXenes)
  • Carbide and carbonitride based composites
  • Structural metal carbide and carbonitride
  • Functional metal carbide and carbonitride
  • Synthesis strategies for metal carbide and carbonitride
  • Solid state reactions
  • Sintering techniques
  • Phase formation and characterization
  • Applications of metal carbide and carbonitride

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Formation and Thermal Behaviors of Ternary Silicon Oxycarbides derived from Silsesquioxane Derivatives
Materials 2019, 12(10), 1721; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12101721 - 27 May 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1482
Abstract
Silsesquioxane (SQ) derivatives possessing intramolecular H2C = CH- groups and Si-H groups were designed as precursors for ternary silicon oxycarbide (SiOC). By using R-Si(OMe)3, H-Si(OEt)3 and (H-Si(Me)2)2O as starting compounds, SQ derivatives of VH-SQ [...] Read more.
Silsesquioxane (SQ) derivatives possessing intramolecular H2C = CH- groups and Si-H groups were designed as precursors for ternary silicon oxycarbide (SiOC). By using R-Si(OMe)3, H-Si(OEt)3 and (H-Si(Me)2)2O as starting compounds, SQ derivatives of VH-SQ (R = vinyl) and St-H-SQ (R = stylyl) were successfully synthesized through the conventional sol-gel route. Simultaneous thermogravimetric and mass spectroscopic analyses up to 1000 °C revealed that in situ cross-linking via hydrosilylation and demethanation of VH-SQ suppressed the evolution of gaseous hydrocarbon species to afford amorphous SiOC having a composition close to the desired stoichiometric SiO2(1−x)Cx (x = ca. 0.3) with a high yield. The effect of carbon content on the phase separation and crystallization of the SQ-derived amorphous SiOC was studied by several spectroscopic analyses and TEM observation. The results were discussed aiming to develop a novel polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs) route for in situ formation of binary β-SiC-amorphous SiO2 nanocomposites with enhanced thermal and mechanical stability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Metal Carbide/Carbonitride Materials)
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Article
Oxidation Resistance and Microstructure Evaluation of a Polymer Derived Ceramic (PDC) Composite Coating Applied onto Sintered Steel
Materials 2019, 12(6), 914; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12060914 - 19 Mar 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1530
Abstract
Powder metallurgy is a competitive technology to produce ferrous near net shape parts for diverse engineering applications. However, their inherent porosity increases the susceptibility to oxidation and sealing their surface is mandatory to avoid premature degradation. Alongside, polymer derived ceramics (PDCs), such as [...] Read more.
Powder metallurgy is a competitive technology to produce ferrous near net shape parts for diverse engineering applications. However, their inherent porosity increases the susceptibility to oxidation and sealing their surface is mandatory to avoid premature degradation. Alongside, polymer derived ceramics (PDCs), such as silicon-carbonitride, have drawn attention concerning their high temperature and chemical stability. However, PDCs undergo volume shrinkage during ceramization that leads to defect formation. The shrinkage can be compensated by the addition of fillers, which are also capable of tailoring the ceramic resulting properties. This work evaluates the processing of PDC-based coatings loaded with ZrO2 and glass fillers to compensate for the shrinkage, densify the coating and seal the sintered steel surface. Therefore, polymeric slurries were sprayed onto sintered steel substrates, which were pyrolyzed at different temperatures for microstructural and oxidation resistance evaluation. Microstructural modifications caused by the enhanced glass viscous flow during pyrolysis at 800 °C resulted in more homogeneous, dense and protective coatings, which reduced the mass gain up to 40 wt% after 100 h of oxidation at 450 °C in air in comparison to the uncoated substrate. Moreover, no macrocracks or spallation were detected, confirming the feasibility of PDC composite barrier coatings for sintered steels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Metal Carbide/Carbonitride Materials)
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Article
Iron [email protected] Nanocomposites: A Tool Box of Functional Materials
Materials 2019, 12(2), 323; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12020323 - 21 Jan 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2070
Abstract
Iron carbide (Fe3C) is a ceramic magnetic material with high potential for applications in different fields, including catalysis, medicine imaging, coatings, and sensors. Despite its interesting properties, it is still somehow largely unexplored, probably due to challenging synthetic conditions. In this [...] Read more.
Iron carbide (Fe3C) is a ceramic magnetic material with high potential for applications in different fields, including catalysis, medicine imaging, coatings, and sensors. Despite its interesting properties, it is still somehow largely unexplored, probably due to challenging synthetic conditions. In this contribution, we present a sol-gel-based method that allows preparing different Fe3[email protected] nanocomposites with tailored properties for specific applications, in particular, we have focused on and discussed potential uses for adsorption of noxious gas and waste removal. Nanocomposites were prepared using readily available and “green” sources, such as urea, simple and complex sugars, and chitosan. The nanocomposite prepared from chitosan was found to be more efficient for CO2 uptake, while the sample synthetized from cellulose had optimal capability for dye absorption and waste oil removal from water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Metal Carbide/Carbonitride Materials)
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Article
Towards Porous Silicon Oxycarbide Materials: Effects of Solvents on Microstructural Features of Poly(methylhydrosiloxane)/Divynilbenzene Aerogels
Materials 2018, 11(12), 2589; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11122589 - 19 Dec 2018
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1651
Abstract
We investigate the impact of solvents on the microstructure of poly(methylhydrosiloxane)/divinylbenzene (PMHS/DVB) aerogels. The gels are obtained in highly diluted conditions via hydrosilylation reaction of PMHS bearing Si-H groups and cross-linking it with C=C groups of DVB. Polymer aerogels are obtained after solvent [...] Read more.
We investigate the impact of solvents on the microstructure of poly(methylhydrosiloxane)/divinylbenzene (PMHS/DVB) aerogels. The gels are obtained in highly diluted conditions via hydrosilylation reaction of PMHS bearing Si-H groups and cross-linking it with C=C groups of DVB. Polymer aerogels are obtained after solvent exchange with liquid CO2 and subsequent supercritical drying. Samples are characterized using microscopy and porosimetry. Common pore-formation concepts do not provide a solid rationale for the observed data. We postulate that solubility and swelling of the cross-linked polymer in various solvents are major factors governing pore formation of these PMHS/DVB polymer aerogels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Metal Carbide/Carbonitride Materials)
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Review

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Review
Carbides and Nitrides of Zirconium and Hafnium
Materials 2019, 12(17), 2728; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12172728 - 26 Aug 2019
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 2643
Abstract
Among transition metal carbides and nitrides, zirconium, and hafnium compounds are the most stable and have the highest melting temperatures. Here we review published data on phases and phase equilibria in Hf-Zr-C-N-O system, from experiment and ab initio computations with focus on rocksalt [...] Read more.
Among transition metal carbides and nitrides, zirconium, and hafnium compounds are the most stable and have the highest melting temperatures. Here we review published data on phases and phase equilibria in Hf-Zr-C-N-O system, from experiment and ab initio computations with focus on rocksalt Zr and Hf carbides and nitrides, their solid solutions and oxygen solubility limits. The systematic experimental studies on phase equilibria and thermodynamics were performed mainly 40–60 years ago, mostly for binary systems of Zr and Hf with C and N. Since then, synthesis of several oxynitrides was reported in the fluorite-derivative type of structures, of orthorhombic and cubic higher nitrides Zr3N4 and Hf3N4. An ever-increasing stream of data is provided by ab initio computations, and one of the testable predictions is that the rocksalt HfC0.75N0.22 phase would have the highest known melting temperature. Experimental data on melting temperatures of hafnium carbonitrides are absent, but minimum in heat capacity and maximum in hardness were reported for Hf(C,N) solid solutions. New methods, such as electrical pulse heating and laser melting, can fill the gaps in experimental data and validate ab initio predictions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Metal Carbide/Carbonitride Materials)
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