Special Issue "Material Analysis of Additively Manufactured Metals"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Manufacturing Processes and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ludmila Kučerová
Website
Guest Editor
Regional Technological Institute, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 30614 Plzen, Czech Republic
Interests: relationship between processing parameters microstructure and mechanical properties of metals, microstructure analysis of metals by light and scanning electron microscopy, additively manufactured metals, advanced high strength steels, in-situ testing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Additive manufacturing (AM) allows for the design of innovative and lightweight products with complex geometries and improved functional and mechanical properties. However, AM is still facing some material issues, for example, high residual stresses, pores, and impurities, and lower impact toughens and creep resistance, than corresponding conventional material. Intensive material research is still necessary to obtain reliable and high-quality products.

This Special Issue will cover the latest advances in the field of the additive manufacturing of metals. Contributions focused on the material aspects of metal additive manufacturing on any of the following topics will be of a particular interest: the effect of AM parameters and subsequent post-treatment parameters on microstructures and the mechanical properties of metals; creep and fatigue; failure mechanisms and crack formation; in-situ testing; the study of phase transformations during AM and/or subsequent heat treatment; the determination and reduction of residual stresses and porosity; the production and characterization of welds and joints of AM metals, including hybrid joins; the thermal and deformation stability of AM metals; the monitoring, description, and simulations of material behavior during the AM process.

It is my pleasure to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue. Original, high-quality research articles and reviews are encouraged for submission.

Dr. Ludmila Kučerová
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Effect of processing parameters on microstructures and mechanical properties
  • Improvement of mechanical properties of AM metals
  • Porosity of AM products
  • Characterization of material behavior during AM process
  • Welds and joints of AM metals
  • Failure mechanisms and crack formation.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Selective Laser Melting Technological Parameters on the Mechanical Properties of Additively Manufactured Elements Using 316L Austenitic Steel
Materials 2020, 13(6), 1449; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13061449 - 22 Mar 2020
Abstract
The main aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different energy density values used for the additively manufactured elements using selective laser melting (SLM).The group of process parameters considered was selected from the first-stage parameters identified in preliminary research. Samples [...] Read more.
The main aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different energy density values used for the additively manufactured elements using selective laser melting (SLM).The group of process parameters considered was selected from the first-stage parameters identified in preliminary research. Samples manufactured using three different sets of parameter values were subjected to static tensile and compression tests. The samples were also subjected to dynamic Split–Hopkinson tests. To verify the microstructural changes after the dynamic tests, microstructural analyses were conducted. Additionally, the element deformation during the tensile tests was analyzed using digital image correlation (DIC). To analyze the influence of the selected parameters and verify the layered structure of the manufactured elements, sclerometer scratch hardness tests were carried out on each sample. Based on the research results, it was possible to observe the porosity growth mechanism and its influence on the material strength (including static and dynamic tests). Parameters modifications that caused 20% lower energy density, as well as elongation of the elements during tensile testing, decreased twice, which was strictly connected with porosity growth. An increase of energy density, by almost three times, caused a significant reduction of force fluctuations differences between both tested surfaces (parallel and perpendicular to the building platform) during sclerometer hardness testing. That kind of phenomenon had been taken into account in the microstructure investigations before and after dynamic testing, where it had been spotted as a positive impact on material deformations based on fused material formation after SLM processing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Material Analysis of Additively Manufactured Metals)
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Open AccessArticle
Laser Welding of SLM-Manufactured Tubes Made of IN625 and IN718
Materials 2019, 12(18), 2967; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12182967 - 12 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The advantage of selective laser melting (SLM) is its high accuracy and geometrical flexibility. Because the maximum size of the components is limited by the process chamber, possibilities must be found to combine several parts manufactured by SLM. An application where this is [...] Read more.
The advantage of selective laser melting (SLM) is its high accuracy and geometrical flexibility. Because the maximum size of the components is limited by the process chamber, possibilities must be found to combine several parts manufactured by SLM. An application where this is necessary, is, for example, the components of gas turbines, such as burners or oil return pipes, and inserts, which can be joined by circumferential welds. However, only a few investigations to date have been carried out for the welding of components produced by SLM. The object of this paper is, therefore, to investigate the feasibility of laser beam welding for joining SLM tube connections made of nickel-based alloys. For this purpose, SLM-manufactured Inconel 625 and Inconel 718 tubes were welded with a Yb:YAG disk laser and subsequently examined for residual stresses and defects. The results showed that the welds had no significant influence on the residual stresses. A good weld quality could be achieved in the seam circumference. However, pores and pore nests were found in the final overlap area, which meant that no continuous good welding quality could be accomplished. Pore formation was presumably caused by capillary instabilities when the laser power was ramped out. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Material Analysis of Additively Manufactured Metals)
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