Special Issue "Advances in Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. DSc Eng. Sylwester Samborski
Website
Guest Editor
Lublin University of Technology, Department of Applied Mechanics, 36 Nadbystrzycka St., 20-618 Lublin, Poland
Interests: mechanics of materials; damage identification; fracture; delamination; acoustic emission; finite element method

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am honored to announce a Special Issue of the “Materials” journal (IF 2.972) on Advances in Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites. The issue is thought to cover all the newest outcomes and trends in modeling, fabrication, testing and damage detection of the contemporary FRP materials. The encouragement to publish valuable papers is addressed to a wide group of scientists and practitioners, working in the field of composites. Below you will find a short characteristics of the Special Issue, followed by a set of keywords, as it is seen by the Guest Editor.

The Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (FRP) composites have reached today a significant level of applications in many branches of industry, in fabrication of spaceships, airplanes, bridges, high-performance cars, boats, sports equipment etc. Their properties can be tailored towards the prospective applications - designers can chose among various matrix and fiber materials, as well as ply sequences, including those elastically coupled, to gain a desired behavior of the resultant composite structures. An important subject of the contemporary research are techniques, devices and production technologies for actuation, monitoring and data transmission in the FRP structures. On the other hand, the risk of damage is relatively high which brings a need to detect and to identify various types of defects, in order to provide a sufficient level of safety and to study damage tolerance of highly responsible composite structures. This demands both an arrangement and an assessment of electrical, thermal, mechanical and other properties of the FRPs, both in static and dynamic regime. Any of the techniques for damage detection or identification, such as acoustic emission or thermography, as well as the methods for the internal structure exploration-fractography or X-ray tomography cannot be overestimated in the process of the composites’ development. Moreover, proper design of the FRP structures, as well as planning of the experiments is nowadays impossible without appropriate modeling techniques, such as the Finite Element Method (FEM) and the respective strength, stability, damage and fracture criteria to be implemented in the software.

In the light of the above, any progress in design, manufacturing and testing methods is of great importance for further expansion of the field of application of the advantageous materials which are fiber-reinforced composites.

Hereby I would like to encourage any of the researchers working in the field to submit their valuable papers and in this way strengthen the scientific impact of the prospective Special Issue of the “Materials” journal.

Assoc. Prof. DSc Eng. Sylwester Samborski
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Fiber-reinforced composite
  • Delamination
  • Fracture toughness
  • Damage tolerance
  • Buckling and warping
  • Crashworthiness
  • Vibrations
  • Impact
  • Nondestructive testing
  • Elastic couplings
  • Finite element modeling
  • Elastic waves propagation
  • Acoustic emission
  • Prepreg

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Progressive Failure Analysis of Thin-Walled Composite Structures Verified Experimentally
Materials 2020, 13(5), 1138; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13051138 - 04 Mar 2020
Abstract
The subject of the presented research was a thin-walled composite column made of CFRP (carbon-epoxy laminate). The test sample had a top-hat cross-section with a symmetrical arrangement of laminate layers [90/−45/45/0]s. The composite structure was subjected to the process of axial [...] Read more.
The subject of the presented research was a thin-walled composite column made of CFRP (carbon-epoxy laminate). The test sample had a top-hat cross-section with a symmetrical arrangement of laminate layers [90/−45/45/0]s. The composite structure was subjected to the process of axial compression. Experimental and numerical tests for the loss of stability and load-carrying capacity of the composite construction were carried out. The numerical buckling analysis was carried out based on the minimum potential energy criterion (based on the solution of an eigenvalue problem). The study of loss of load-carrying capacity was performed on the basis of a progressive failure analysis, solving the problem of non-linear stability based on Newton-Raphson’s incremental iterative method. Numerical results of critical and post-critical state were confronted with experimental research in order to estimate the vulnerable areas of the structure, showing areas prone to damage of the material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
Material Characterization of PMC/TBC Composite Under High Strain Rates and Elevated Temperatures
Materials 2020, 13(1), 167; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13010167 - 01 Jan 2020
Abstract
Polymer matrix composites (PMC), despite their many advantages, have limited use at elevated temperatures. To expand the scope of their uses, it becomes necessary to use thermal barrier coatings (TBC). In addition to elevated temperatures, composite structures, and thus TBC barriers, can be [...] Read more.
Polymer matrix composites (PMC), despite their many advantages, have limited use at elevated temperatures. To expand the scope of their uses, it becomes necessary to use thermal barrier coatings (TBC). In addition to elevated temperatures, composite structures, and thus TBC barriers, can be exposed to damage from impacts of foreign objects. Therefore, before using the thermal barrier in practice, knowledge about its behavior under high-speed loads is necessary. The paper presents results for samples with the PMC/TBC system subjected to dynamic compression using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). The substrate was made of CFRP (carbon reinforced polymer) with epoxy matrix and twill fabric. TBC was made of ceramic mat saturated by commercial hardener from Vitcas company. The tests were carried out at ambient temperature and elevated temperature—55 °C and 90 °C. Tests at ambient temperature were carried out for three pressure levels: 1, 1.5, and 2 bar. Only the pressure of 1 bar was used for the elevated temperature. Studies have shown that the limit load is 1 bar for ambient temperature. At 1.5 bar, cracks occurred in the TBC structure. Increased temperature also adversely affects the TBC barrier strength and it is damaged at a pressure of 1 bar. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites)
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