Special Issue "Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Composite Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Simulation and Design".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ana Pavlovic
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Interests: Finite Element Analysis, Materials Science, CAD e FEM Modeling, Experiments, Mechanics of Composite Materials, Impact, Fatigue, Ansys WB, FEMAP, Nastran.
Prof. Miroslav Zivkovic
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Applied Mechanics and Automatic control, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Serbia
Interests: Applied mechanics, applied informatics and computer engineering, constitutive models, numerical methods, dynamic and impact problems.
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Dr. Carlos Pérez Bergmann
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Post-Graduation Program in Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
Interests: Development of raw materials, products and processes; Advanced ceramics; Nanostructured materials; Wear and erosion; Biomaterials; Porcelain; Refractory materials; Glass and vitro ceramics; Synthesis of materials (Thermal Spray, Sol-Gel, Combustion, CVD); Recycling.
Prof. Dr. Dragan Marinkovic
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Structural Analysis, Technical University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany
Interests: finite element analysis; nano materials; nano technology; materials science; modeling; mathematical modeling; experimentation; ansys; labview
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last decades, the fast-paced evolution of industry has intimately relied on the technology of new materials, which contribute to productive supply chains due to their features such as lower price, enhanced sustainability and improved mechanical performance. With the aim of expanding materials technology development beyond methods based exclusively on processing and heat treatments, much of the attention of researchers and technologists has been focused on investigating the usage of composite materials in innovative applications, as they offer unique features that cannot be found in a single material. The broad spectrum of properties that can be tailored by designing composite materials include the high toughness-to-weight ratio of fiber-reinforced polymers, and the elevated wear resistance of cermets, both of which are arousing the interest of industry in many sectors. Recently, the use of composite materials has significantly increased worldwide, gradually replacing more traditional materials in various fields such as automotive, naval, water sports and renewable energies, which now rely on more light-weight composites to provide energy efficiency in their structures. Weight reduction, high strength and rigidity, corrosion and abrasion resistance, enhanced thermal conductivity and elevated endurance to fatigue are just some of the characteristics that have been investigated to date. Contributions to this Special Issue will consider innovation and originality in the world of composite materials, including experimental characterization, numerical simulation techniques, novel industrial applications and sustainability.

Dr. Ana Pavlovic
Dr. Miroslav Zivkovic
Dr. Carlos Pérez Bergmann
Dr. Dragan Marinkovic
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Composite structures
  • Numerical simulations
  • Fiber-reinforced composites
  • Polymeric composites
  • Ceramic composites
  • Experimental mechanical assessment
  • Bending testing
  • Impact testing
  • Fatigue testing
  • Damage modeling
  • Cermets
  • Sustainability
  • Lifecycle assessment

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
A New Approach of Mathematical Analysis of Structure of Graphene as a Potential Material for Composites
Materials 2019, 12(23), 3918; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12233918 - 27 Nov 2019
Abstract
The new analysis of a simplified plane model of single-layered graphene is presented in this work as a potential material for reinforcement in ultralight and durable composites. However, owing to the clear literature discrepancies regarding the mechanical properties of graphene, it is extremely [...] Read more.
The new analysis of a simplified plane model of single-layered graphene is presented in this work as a potential material for reinforcement in ultralight and durable composites. However, owing to the clear literature discrepancies regarding the mechanical properties of graphene, it is extremely difficult to conduct any numerical analysis to design parts of machines and devices made of composites. Therefore, it is necessary to first systemize the analytical and finite element method (FEM) calculations, which will synergize mathematical models, used in the analysis of mechanical properties of graphene sheets, with the very nature of the chemical bond. For this reason, the considered model is a hexagonal mesh simulating the bonds between carbon atoms in graphene. The determination of mechanical properties of graphene was solved using the superposition method and finite element method. The calculation of the graphene tension was performed for two main directions of the graphene arrangement: armchair and zigzag. The computed results were verified and referred to articles and papers in the accessible literature. It was stated that in unloaded flake of graphene, the equilibrium of forces exists; however, owing to changes of inter-atom distance, the inner forces occur, which are responsible for the appearance of strains. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Composite Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Behavior of Cross Arms Inserted in Concrete-Filled Circular GFRP Tubular Columns
Materials 2019, 12(14), 2280; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12142280 - 16 Jul 2019
Abstract
Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) materials nowadays have attracted much attention in both retrofitting of aged infrastructure and developing of new structural systems attributed to the outstanding mechanical properties. Extensive studies have been performed on concrete-filled glass FRP (GFRP) tubes for the potential application in [...] Read more.
Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) materials nowadays have attracted much attention in both retrofitting of aged infrastructure and developing of new structural systems attributed to the outstanding mechanical properties. Extensive studies have been performed on concrete-filled glass FRP (GFRP) tubes for the potential application in piling, poles, highways overhead sign structures and bridge components. The new hybrid member also provides an alternative solution for traditional transmission structures. However, the connection between concrete-filled GFRP tubes and cross arms has not been fully understood. In this paper, an experimental study and theoretical analysis were conducted on the behavior of cross arms inserted in concrete-filled circular GFRP tubular columns. Steel bars with a larger stiffness in comparison with GFRP tubes were selected here for the cross arm to simulate a more severe scenario. The structural responses of the system when the cross arms were subjected to concentrated loads were carefully recorded. Experimental results showed that the concrete-filled GFRP tubes could offer a sufficient restraint to the deformation of the cross arm. No visible cracks were found on the GFRP tube at the corner of the cross arm where the stress and strain concentrated. Theoretical solutions based on available theories and equations were adopted to predict the displacement of the cross arms and a good agreement was achieved between the prediction results and experimental findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Composite Materials)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Dealing with the Effect of Air in Fluid Structure Interaction by Coupled SPH-FEM Methods
Materials 2019, 12(7), 1162; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071162 - 10 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and the finite element method (FEM) are often combined with the scope to model the interaction between structures and the surrounding fluids (FSI). There is the case, for instance, of aircrafts crashing on water or speedboats slamming into waves. [...] Read more.
Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and the finite element method (FEM) are often combined with the scope to model the interaction between structures and the surrounding fluids (FSI). There is the case, for instance, of aircrafts crashing on water or speedboats slamming into waves. Due to the high computational complexity, the influence of air is often neglected, limiting the analysis to the interaction between structure and water. On the contrary, this work aims to specifically investigate the effect of air when merged inside the fluid–structure interaction (FSI) computational models. Measures from experiments were used as a basis to validate estimations comparing results from models that include or exclude the presence of air. Outcomes generally showed a great correlation between simulation and experiments, with marginal differences in terms of accelerations, especially during the first phase of impact and considering the presence of air in the model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Composite Materials)
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