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Article

Predicting Composite Component Behavior Using Element Level Crashworthiness Tests, Finite Element Analysis and Automated Parametric Identification

1
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin, Italy
2
Polymers and Glass Department, Group Materials Labs, Centro Ricerche Fiat, Pomigliano d’Arco, 80038 Naples, Italy
3
Illinois Tool Works Inc. (ITW) Test and Measurement Italy, Instron Compagnia Europea Apparecchi Scientifici Torino (CEAST), Via Airauda 12, Pianezza, 10044 Turin, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2020, 13(20), 4501; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13204501
Received: 7 September 2020 / Revised: 1 October 2020 / Accepted: 6 October 2020 / Published: 11 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Composite Materials)
Fibre reinforced plastics have tailorable and superior mechanical characteristics compared to metals and can be used to construct relevant components such as primary crash structures for automobiles. However, the absence of standardized methodologies to predict component level damage has led to their underutilization as compared to their metallic counterparts, which are used extensively to manufacture primary crash structures. This paper presents a methodology that uses crashworthiness results from in-plane impact tests, conducted on carbon-fibre reinforced epoxy flat plates, to tune the related material card in Radioss using two different parametric identification techniques: global and adaptive response search methods. The resulting virtual material model was then successfully validated by comparing the crushing behavior with results obtained from experiments that were conducted by impacting a Formula SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) crash box. Use of automated identification techniques significantly reduces the development time of composite crash structures, whilst the predictive capability reduces the need for component level tests, thereby making the development process more efficient, automated and economical, thereby reducing the cost of development using composite materials. This in turn promotes the development of vehicles that meet safety standards with lower mass and noxious gas emissions. View Full-Text
Keywords: crashworthiness; impact behavior prediction; automated parametric identification; composite materials; finite element analysis crashworthiness; impact behavior prediction; automated parametric identification; composite materials; finite element analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Garg, R.; Babaei, I.; Paolino, D.S.; Vigna, L.; Cascone, L.; Calzolari, A.; Galizia, G.; Belingardi, G. Predicting Composite Component Behavior Using Element Level Crashworthiness Tests, Finite Element Analysis and Automated Parametric Identification. Materials 2020, 13, 4501. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13204501

AMA Style

Garg R, Babaei I, Paolino DS, Vigna L, Cascone L, Calzolari A, Galizia G, Belingardi G. Predicting Composite Component Behavior Using Element Level Crashworthiness Tests, Finite Element Analysis and Automated Parametric Identification. Materials. 2020; 13(20):4501. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13204501

Chicago/Turabian Style

Garg, Ravin, Iman Babaei, Davide Salvatore Paolino, Lorenzo Vigna, Lucio Cascone, Andrea Calzolari, Giuseppe Galizia, and Giovanni Belingardi. 2020. "Predicting Composite Component Behavior Using Element Level Crashworthiness Tests, Finite Element Analysis and Automated Parametric Identification" Materials 13, no. 20: 4501. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13204501

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